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1 - 10 of 30 results for: LINGUIST ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LINGUIST 54N: Social Bias and Earwitness Memory

As individuals, we would like to believe that we are free from biases and that we are somehow immune to acting on the social biases that we have been socialized to since birth. We would like to believe that we can report experiences accurately, recalling events as they truly happened. But, memory is faulty and stereotypes and social biases are pervasive. And, at a level beneath our own control, these biases slip in and influence our memory of events. Eyewitness memory, and the inaccuracy and unreliability of eyewitnesses, is a perfect example of this. But, what about the things we hear? Speech carries a great deal of information; packets of co-varying cues we have been raised to recognize categorically, informing us about a talker¿s race, accent, emotion, and gender. We have, through our ears, information about events that occur. And, we have in our minds, stereotyped expectations about how various groups of people behave and what various groups of people might say. In this course, we more »
As individuals, we would like to believe that we are free from biases and that we are somehow immune to acting on the social biases that we have been socialized to since birth. We would like to believe that we can report experiences accurately, recalling events as they truly happened. But, memory is faulty and stereotypes and social biases are pervasive. And, at a level beneath our own control, these biases slip in and influence our memory of events. Eyewitness memory, and the inaccuracy and unreliability of eyewitnesses, is a perfect example of this. But, what about the things we hear? Speech carries a great deal of information; packets of co-varying cues we have been raised to recognize categorically, informing us about a talker¿s race, accent, emotion, and gender. We have, through our ears, information about events that occur. And, we have in our minds, stereotyped expectations about how various groups of people behave and what various groups of people might say. In this course, we will explore how these two types of information (e.g., the percept of what is actually heard vs. our stereotypes about who is likely to have said what) clash together and influence ¿earwitness memory¿. We will read and critique journal articles, blogs, and popular science articles, think about the reliability of memory for auditory events, and we will work together to develop three well-designed thought experiments that address questions at the heart of this issue. Along the way, we will learn a bit about the acoustics of speech, social variation in speech, speech perception and spoken word recognition, memory, and experimental design and analysis. Students in this course should be committed to reading the assignments, sharing their ideas about the readings (without concern for ¿being right¿), and think creatively about ways we can explore the idea of earwitness memory together. While this is a one-quarter course, my goal is to pursue our thought experiments collaboratively, with any interested students in subsequent quarters.
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3
Instructors: Sumner, M. (PI)

LINGUIST 130B: Introduction to Lexical Semantics

Introduction to basic concepts and issues in the linguistic study of word meaning. We explore grammatical regularities in word meaning and the relation between word meaning and the conceptual realm. The questions we address include the following. How is the meaning of a word determined from its internal structure?  How can simple words have complex meanings?  What is a possible word?  How does a word's meaning determine the word's syntactic distribution and what kind of reasoning does it support? What kind of information belongs to the lexical entry of a word?  The course will show that the investigation of the linguistic and semantic structure of words draws on the full resources of linguistic theory and methodology. Prerequisites:  Symsys 1, Linguist 35, or equivalent or permission of the instructor.  Linguist 130A is not a prerequisite for this course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-FR

LINGUIST 150E: Who Speaks Good English

Many people have strong beliefs that there are right and wrong ways of speaking, good and bad versions of their language. These norms are reinforced explicitly in the education system, and implicitly in the ways that people talk about language or see it portrayed in media. Students will learn about the history, development, and linguistic structure of three language varieties that are sometimes characterized by non-linguists as "bad English": Singaporean English, Jamaican Creole, and African American Vernacular English. By critically examining public discourses about these language varieties and learning to identify their systematic patterns of grammatical structure, students will discover that popular ideas about "good" and "bad" English are rooted in the narratives that surround language, not linguistic fact.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

LINGUIST 157: Sociophonetics (LINGUIST 257)

The study of phonetic aspects of sociolinguistic variation and the social significance of phonetic variation. Acoustic analysis of vowels, consonants, prosody, and voice quality. Hands-on work on collaborative research project. Prerequisite: 105, 110 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-FR
Instructors: Podesva, R. (PI)

LINGUIST 168: Introduction to Linguistic Typology

This course covers the foundations of the linguistic subfield concerned with comparing and classifying world languages. The course provides an overview of the analytic tools which may be used to identify and classify a language based on its phonological, morphological, and syntactic properties, and explores the major ways in which languages may be similar or different in these domains. Students will acquire a useful toolkit for studying novel, unusual, and typologically diverse linguistic data, and for conducting fieldwork on understudied languages. Prerequisites: Linguist 110, 121A, 121B, 130A, 130B, or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Ershova, K. (PI)

LINGUIST 180: From Languages to Information (CS 124, LINGUIST 280)

Extracting meaning, information, and structure from human language text, speech, web pages, social networks. Introducing methods (regex, edit distance, naive Bayes, logistic regression, neural embeddings, inverted indices, collaborative filtering, PageRank), applications (chatbots, sentiment analysis, information retrieval, question answering, text classification, social networks, recommender systems), and ethical issues in both. Prerequisites: CS106B
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR
Instructors: Jurafsky, D. (PI)

LINGUIST 188: Natural Language Understanding (CS 224U, LINGUIST 288, SYMSYS 195U)

Project-oriented class focused on developing systems and algorithms for robust machine understanding of human language. Draws on theoretical concepts from linguistics, natural language processing, and machine learning. Topics include lexical semantics, distributed representations of meaning, relation extraction, semantic parsing, sentiment analysis, and dialogue agents, with special lectures on developing projects, presenting research results, and making connections with industry. Prerequisites: one of LINGUIST 180/280, CS 124, CS 224N, or CS 224S.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4

LINGUIST 192: Language Testing (LINGUIST 292A)

Performance with language (speaking, reading, writing, listening, translating or interpreting) is used to measure a person's proficiency or achievement level in the language. Language performance is also used to measure other human characteristics, including psycho-social states and traits. The course will review basic methods in language measurement and cover their use as applied in education, psychology, and commerce. Topics include both traditional and automatic methods for assessing speaking, reading, writing, affect, and language disorders. Students will develop, apply, and evaluate a language test.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

LINGUIST 195A: Undergraduate Research Workshop

Designed for undergraduates beginning or working on research projects in linguistics. Participants present and receive feedback on their projects and receive tips on the research and writing process.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Lake, E. (PI)

LINGUIST 197A: Undergraduate Research Seminar

Senior capstone seminar. Joint readings in an annually varying topic, exploring the implications and importance of linguistic research for other domains of knowledge or practice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3
Instructors: Jurafsky, D. (PI)
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