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1 - 10 of 135 results for: LAW ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 203: Constitutional Law

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. This course offers an introduction to American constitutional law. In addition to examining questions of interpretive method, the course focuses on the powers of the federal government and the allocation of decision making authority among government institutions, including both federalism and separation of powers. Class participation, attendance, written assignments, and final exam. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 207: Criminal Law

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It examines the traditional general issues in the substantive criminal law, including the purposes of punishment and the appropriate limits on the use of the criminal sanction. It focuses predominantly on how criminal statutes are organized around objective offense elements (conduct, causation, and attendant circumstances) and mental states, and to a lesser degree on inchoate crimes, complicity, justification and excuse.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

LAW 224A: Federal Litigation in a Global Context: Coursework

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated global torts case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and transnational lawyering. Elements used in grading: attendance, class participation, oral argument, assignments in preparation for written briefs (outlines, drafts, research and citation assignments), written briefs, and professionalism. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 4 units total)

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final pro more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track (See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations). With the approval of the instructor, successful completion of a directed research project of two units or more may satisfy the JD writing requirement to the extent of one research writing course (R course). See Directed Research under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 12 units total)

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 8 units total)

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 807A: Policy Practicum: Federal Indian Law: Yurok Legal Assistance

Client: Yurok Tribe. Students will assist the client, the Office of the Tribal Attorney of the Yurok Tribe (the largest federally recognized Native nation in California), by conducting legal research on a variety of possible topics, including tribal water rights, tribal police powers, tribal/county relationships, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. The exact scope and nature of the research will be determined in consultation with the client. Students will produce policy memos based on their research to share with the client. Coursework or background in federal Indian law is helpful but not required. The project may involve opportunity to present virtually to the tribal council. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

LAW 807R: Policy Practicum: Human Rights & International Justice

Atrocities continue to ravage our planet--in Syria, Iraq, Myanmar/Burma, North Korea, and Yemen, to name a few. And yet, the international community is increasingly divided when it comes to advancing the project of international justice. Whereas earlier armed conflicts have inspired the establishment of international or hybrid tribunals (such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone) or were referred to the International Criminal Court (such as the situations in Darfur and Libya), a pervasive tribunal fatigue and other geopolitical impasses have greeted today's armed conflicts and repressive regimes. The U.N. Security Council in particular has been hamstrung by the propensity of Russia, sometimes with China in tow, to veto (or threaten to veto) robust accountability proposals that have been put forward. States have been able to reach consensus only around the imperative of prosecuting terrorism and members of the so-called more »
Atrocities continue to ravage our planet--in Syria, Iraq, Myanmar/Burma, North Korea, and Yemen, to name a few. And yet, the international community is increasingly divided when it comes to advancing the project of international justice. Whereas earlier armed conflicts have inspired the establishment of international or hybrid tribunals (such as the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the Special Court for Sierra Leone) or were referred to the International Criminal Court (such as the situations in Darfur and Libya), a pervasive tribunal fatigue and other geopolitical impasses have greeted today's armed conflicts and repressive regimes. The U.N. Security Council in particular has been hamstrung by the propensity of Russia, sometimes with China in tow, to veto (or threaten to veto) robust accountability proposals that have been put forward. States have been able to reach consensus only around the imperative of prosecuting terrorism and members of the so-called Islamic State, including foreign fighters. As a result of these obstacles, advocates and their sovereign allies have looked to other organs and institutions within and without the United Nations to respond to the commission of international crimes. The General Assembly, the Human Rights Council, and even the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons have thus all become engines of accountability, in part because they are not subject to the pernicious veto. In addition, civil society actors (such as the Commission on International Justice & Accountability and the Afghanistan Human Rights and Democracy Organization) have stepped up to undertake investigative functions that would ordinarily be performed by sovereign states or international prosecutors. A number of human rights law firms--such as the Center for Justice & Accountability and Accountability Counsel--are continuing to seek justice in U.S. courts and other fora under a suite of statutes that allow for civil redress for international law violations. And, a new breed of CS-for-Good organizations--such as Benetech and Hala Systems--are developing new technology tools to undergird accountability efforts, but need assistance with understanding the operative legal framework and evidentiary standards. This proposed lab will support several of these institutions in their effort to move justice processes forward. On the multilateral plane, confirmed partners/clients include the International Impartial Independent Mechanism for Syria (IIIM), established by the U.N. General Assembly; the United Nations Investigative Team to Promote Accountability for Crimes Committed by Da'esh/ISIL (UNITAD), established by the Security Council; and the Independent Investigative Mechanism for Myanmar (IIMM), established by the U.N. Human Rights Council. Domestically, the U.S. State Department's Office of Global Criminal Justice has the lead on the United States' transitional justice policy around the globe. It is increasingly beleaguered within the Department and the interagency as it attempts to advance U.S. support for human rights and accountability in the face of significant resistance. In addition, a number of civil society and non-governmental organizations are conducting thorough criminal investigations and forming detailed dossiers on potential perpetrators in an effort to jumpstart national proceedings, including those proceeding under extraordinary bases of jurisdiction; lay the groundwork for international prosecutions when--and if--an opening appears; and support multilateral and unilateral sanctions regimes, such as the United States' Global Magnitsky Act. Closer to home, organizations such as the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) are working with Black Lives Matter and other organizations to utilize United Nations and human rights treaty institutions to raise awareness about police violence and structural racism in the United States. This policy lab will be open to law students in the Fall and Winter quarters during academic year 2020-21. The application process will coincide with the Mills Legal Clinic registration process. Students can enroll in 3-6 units and receive Pathway B Experiential Learning credit towards graduation. Students enrolled in the lab will conduct both factual and legal research on behalf of partner organizations, participate in advocacy efforts aimed at advancing the imperative of accountability for grave international crimes, and generate concrete policy proposals for building a more robust international justice architecture. Work in the lab will expose students to a range of experiential learning opportunities to build and hone the following human rights lawyering and advocacy skills: 1. Interfacing (orally and in writing) with a range of influential civil society, governmental, and multilateral actors; 2. Assisting these organizations with strategic planning, problem solving, diplomatic outreach, and advocacy; 3. Conducting open source investigations on emergent atrocity situations around the world as well as historical events subject to contemporary accountability processes; 4. Conducting trauma-informed interviews with survivors; 5. Recognizing and helping to resolve ethical dilemmas that arise in a human rights practice (such as the tension between fealty to a client and advancing the movement); 6. Refining the information gathered for a range of transitional justice purposes; 7. Conducting traditional legal research and writing projects, including for briefs, human rights reports, proto-indictments, expert reports, and petitions to international human rights bodies; and 8. Practicing project and peer management and other professional skills. Along the way, students will be closely supervised and will receive constant, and stereoscopic, feedback from the instructor as well as from peers and mentors recruited from partner organizations. In addition to this client-facing work, the weekly seminar component of the lab will involve doctrinal instruction in the global human rights ecosystem, including human rights treaties (such as the International Convention on Civil & Political Rights), human rights institutions (such as the Committee Against Torture), international courts (such as the International Criminal Court), and U.N. mandate holders (such as the Working Group on Arbitrary Detention). Students will also have the opportunity to engage in a number of simulations and role plays to practice their human rights reasoning and lawyering skills. In addition to producing work product for clients and partner organizations, students will compose a series of reflection papers over the course of the quarter to capture their experience of developing their professional identity as a human rights lawyer/advocate. This integrated learning environment--which touches upon cognitive, practical, and ethical-social competencies--will enable student lawyers to wed their concrete experience with more abstract theory. Students will be graded on their participation and performance, their written work product, and their commitment to developing their professional skills (with partner organizations, clients, other stakeholders, and each other). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-6 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 12 units total)

LAW 807S: Policy Practicum: Innovating Privacy Protection: Tools and Strategies for California Cities

Client: Office of the Vice-Mayor of the City of Berkeley, CA. Ensuring the privacy rights of residents and technology users in California remains a core responsibility of legislators and regulators in the state. Recent state legislation such as the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), coupled with the state Attorney General's Office implementing regulations, have aimed to provide an expanded range of privacy and consumer protections, and an upcoming, follow-on ballot initiative may further alter the state regulatory landscape. But these efforts are imperfect and incomplete and have been subject to vigorous debate and criticism over both the details of their approach and their ultimate efficacy. Privacy risks can arise from the collection, aggregation, sharing, and use of data by both governments and private businesses and other private actors, and from lack of transparency of and accountability for such actions. This policy lab will explore the role that cities such as Berkeley can more »
Client: Office of the Vice-Mayor of the City of Berkeley, CA. Ensuring the privacy rights of residents and technology users in California remains a core responsibility of legislators and regulators in the state. Recent state legislation such as the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), coupled with the state Attorney General's Office implementing regulations, have aimed to provide an expanded range of privacy and consumer protections, and an upcoming, follow-on ballot initiative may further alter the state regulatory landscape. But these efforts are imperfect and incomplete and have been subject to vigorous debate and criticism over both the details of their approach and their ultimate efficacy. Privacy risks can arise from the collection, aggregation, sharing, and use of data by both governments and private businesses and other private actors, and from lack of transparency of and accountability for such actions. This policy lab will explore the role that cities such as Berkeley can play in furthering efforts to protect privacy against government and private actions, including government acquisition and use of data that is initially collected and aggregated by private entities. We will work with the Office of the Vice-Mayor of Berkeley to engage questions surrounding the nature and scope of the authority held by California Charter Cities like Berkeley to exercise local control and enact legislation to address municipal affairs that include the privacy of their local residents and businesses. The lab will examine the range of powers and regulatory tools available to city governments that might be utilized for privacy protection as part of overall municipal responsibility to protect the health and safety of residents. Part of our focus will be to research and assess approaches from government entities around California and the rest of the country. Students will work with the vice-mayor and may also interview and consult other relevant stakeholders in Berkeley city government and other government entities, relevant privacy experts, community and consumer groups, businesses, and other interested stakeholders as appropriate. Ultimately, we will evaluate best practices and develop recommendations for possible local privacy and related consumer-protection legislation and regulation that is appropriately tailored to safeguard innovation and competition while ensuring that the best interests of local residents and businesses are served, particularly in situations where a city may be particularly well-positioned or have particularly appropriate tools to address privacy concerns. We encourage students who are interested in complex issues of privacy and consumer protection, and in helping identify and develop novel, alternative avenues for enhancing such protection, such as using the the authority of local governments, to join us, including upper-division and graduate students from law, MS&E, public policy, and the social sciences. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. In the winter quarter (1 unit), this policy lab is open only to students who were enrolled in the lab in the fall quarter.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3
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