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1 - 10 of 143 results for: LAW ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

LAW 217: Property

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It deals with possession and ownership of land and with the incidents thereof, including private and public restrictions on its use and development, nuisance, trespass, concurrent interests, landlord and tenant, and eminent domain. Attendance and final exam. Your instructor will advise you of other basis of grading. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

LAW 224B: Federal Litigation in a Global Context: Methods and Practice

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated global torts case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and transnational lawyering. Elements used in grading: attendance, class participation, oral argument, assignments in preparation for written briefs (outlines, drafts, research and citation assignments), written briefs, and professionalism. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final pro more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track (See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations). With the approval of the instructor, successful completion of a directed research project of two units or more may satisfy the JD writing requirement to the extent of one research writing course (R course). See Directed Research under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable 8 times (up to 12 units total)

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 8 units total)

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit

LAW 806Y: Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction

Client: NAACP, https://www.naacp.org/, Tenants Together, https://www.tenantstogether.org/. Justice By Design will examine how changes in the operation of housing courts are responding to the 'new normal' era of COVID-19, which has disproportionately affected communities of color. Even before the pandemic, research showed that black and brown people, especially black women, face substantially higher eviction rates than other demographic groups. The economic hardships of the past year threaten to raise these rates even higher. At the same time, there is a new openness to innovation in the courts, with virtual hearings, community navigators, and eviction diversion programs. The racial equity movement following the killing of George Floyd has also pushed court leaders to a moment of change and reflection. Many court justices and administrators have expressed an interest in making courts more accessible and equitable. This class will use this opportunity to bring policymakers and judicial more »
Client: NAACP, https://www.naacp.org/, Tenants Together, https://www.tenantstogether.org/. Justice By Design will examine how changes in the operation of housing courts are responding to the 'new normal' era of COVID-19, which has disproportionately affected communities of color. Even before the pandemic, research showed that black and brown people, especially black women, face substantially higher eviction rates than other demographic groups. The economic hardships of the past year threaten to raise these rates even higher. At the same time, there is a new openness to innovation in the courts, with virtual hearings, community navigators, and eviction diversion programs. The racial equity movement following the killing of George Floyd has also pushed court leaders to a moment of change and reflection. Many court justices and administrators have expressed an interest in making courts more accessible and equitable. This class will use this opportunity to bring policymakers and judicial administrators together with community members -- especially from the demographic groups most likely to face eviction -- to improve how housing courts work, and to propose new initiatives to prevent evictions. Students will work directly with the NAACP and other partner organizations, which are developing new models for eviction diversion and prevention. The research teams will tackle specific policy challenges, including how to broaden a community's awareness of rights and services; how court rules and procedures might be reformed to allow for meaningful participation; and adaptations in the format for hearings and mediations that enable equal access to all. During the class, students will hear challenges from judicial leaders and housing advocates; conduct user research and design sessions with tenants and landlords; and propose new models of how landlord-tenant issues can be resolved in court hearings or diversion programs. A particular focus will be on programs that can work virtually, and on making these programs accessible and engaging for people from demographic groups most at risk of eviction. The final deliverable will be a proposed initiative for our partners to implement, along with an evaluation plan to measure its impact. It will include a written proposal and analysis, a visual presentation, and a public presentation to policy-makers around the country. The students¿ learning goals are to understand how the housing and eviction system works, including the legal procedures, rights, and sociological dynamics of how this system interrelates with poverty and community stability. Students will also develop policy analysis and design skills grounded in qualitative and quantitative approaches. Students will expand their understanding of how to analyze complex social systems which will, in turn, contribute to new skills in facilitating discussions and collaborating with community members and policymakers to design new policy interventions and programs. This policy lab invites applications from law students and from graduate and upper-class students across the university who are engaged in coursework focused on public policy and social problem solving, especially housing justice. Knowledge of the housing court system is beneficial but not required. The application is available at https://registrar.law.stanford.edu/. Elements used in grading: Attendance Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 9 units total)
Instructors: Hagan, M. (PI)

LAW 807G: Policy Practicum: The Santa Clara County Litigation & Policy Partnership (SCCLPP)

This policy lab inaugurates a new kind of partnership between Stanford Law School and the Office of the County Counsel for the County of Santa Clara. SCCLPP students will work with the leadership and deputies of the office on both litigation and policy matters related to urgent local challenges. Over the long run, SCCLPP projects will relate to fields such as environmental protection, consumer protection, criminal justice, land use law, the rights of immigrant residents, public health, and local finance. During the 2021 Winter and Spring quarters, each student group will focus on one of the following projects: 1. Protecting Consumer Rights in Household Tax Preparation. 2. Putting Settlement Funds to Work for Vulnerable Communities: Strategies for Abating and Preventing Lead Paint Hazards in Housing. 3. Environmental Justice and Building Electrification: Exploring Ways to Bring Clean Energy to Homes and Buildings with a Focus on Low-Income Communities. The SCCLPP is open only to Stanfor more »
This policy lab inaugurates a new kind of partnership between Stanford Law School and the Office of the County Counsel for the County of Santa Clara. SCCLPP students will work with the leadership and deputies of the office on both litigation and policy matters related to urgent local challenges. Over the long run, SCCLPP projects will relate to fields such as environmental protection, consumer protection, criminal justice, land use law, the rights of immigrant residents, public health, and local finance. During the 2021 Winter and Spring quarters, each student group will focus on one of the following projects: 1. Protecting Consumer Rights in Household Tax Preparation. 2. Putting Settlement Funds to Work for Vulnerable Communities: Strategies for Abating and Preventing Lead Paint Hazards in Housing. 3. Environmental Justice and Building Electrification: Exploring Ways to Bring Clean Energy to Homes and Buildings with a Focus on Low-Income Communities. The SCCLPP is open only to Stanford Law Students (2L and 3L JD and Advanced Degree students). Students will be admitted by consent, with a preference for those with past coursework or experience in state or local government law, public interest lawyering, and public service generally. A strong preference attaches to students intending to enroll in both the Winter and Spring quarters, and we do not expect to enroll any new students in the spring quarter. (Students undertaking an externship at the County Counsel's Office during either term will be treated as two-term participants.) The seminar portion of the course meets the first five Thursdays of the quarter from 4:15-6:15; it meets again the last Thursday of the quarter for a lengthy evening briefing at the SCCC's office starting at 5:15 PM. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Anderson, M. (PI)

LAW 807Y: Policy Practicum: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Research Clearinghouse

Client: Stanford Law School. Deliverables: Resources for national DEI database for law schools, final summary report. Law schools, other professional schools, and institutions of higher education all around the country have been reevaluating their structure, mission, curricula, pedagogy, hiring and admissions practices, climate, and other elements of academic life with the goal of ascertaining how best to promote a more just, fair, inclusive, and diverse environment for learning. Students, staff, administrators, and faculty have created listservs and other informal platforms to share ideas and resources, but to date there has been no single research-based platform that gathers cutting edge and canonical work on the wide range of potentially relevant topics to guide and provide structure to the design of reforms or support advocacy on DE&I issues. Stanford Law School and the Robert Crown Library have launched a beta version of the first national clearinghouse to index research of this k more »
Client: Stanford Law School. Deliverables: Resources for national DEI database for law schools, final summary report. Law schools, other professional schools, and institutions of higher education all around the country have been reevaluating their structure, mission, curricula, pedagogy, hiring and admissions practices, climate, and other elements of academic life with the goal of ascertaining how best to promote a more just, fair, inclusive, and diverse environment for learning. Students, staff, administrators, and faculty have created listservs and other informal platforms to share ideas and resources, but to date there has been no single research-based platform that gathers cutting edge and canonical work on the wide range of potentially relevant topics to guide and provide structure to the design of reforms or support advocacy on DE&I issues. Stanford Law School and the Robert Crown Library have launched a beta version of the first national clearinghouse to index research of this kind. This policy lab provides interested students an opportunity to expand the index, help develop and implement standards for curation, incorporate feedback from users, engage in policy discussions about iterative design, and develop frameworks for assessment of the project. The primary work plan involves deepening the available research on a number of topics including: 1L and advanced doctrinal pedagogy, critical race theory, other critical approaches to law, cultural competence and cultural humility in training for law and other service professions, professional judgment, assessments of DE&I training in the private and public sector, published templates for university DE&I reforms, principles of academic freedom, global innovations in DE&I theory, as well as interdisciplinary research on anti-racism, implicit bias and other forms of cognitive bias, viewpoint discrimination, micro-aggression, trauma, and stereotype threat. Students will work with Prof. Norman W. Spaulding and reference librarians at the law school. There may also be opportunity to work with students, staff, administrators, and faculty at other law schools and other university departments. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

LAW 807Z: Policy Practicum: Creating a National Research Cloud

Client: Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). The productive interplay between federal government, research universities, and private enterprise has given rise to an American innovation engine that is the envy of the world. But with respect to artificial intelligence, the American research prowess that's powered decades of growth and prosperity is at risk. There are two reasons: public researchers' lack of access to compute power and the scarcity of meaningful datasets, the two prerequisites for advanced AI research. To address this problem, in 2020 the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) issued a call for the government to create a National Research Cloud (NRC), a close partnership between academia, government, and industry to provide academic researchers with affordable access to high-end computational resources, to large-scale government-held datasets in a secure cloud environment, and to the necessary expertise to benefit from this r more »
Client: Stanford Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI). The productive interplay between federal government, research universities, and private enterprise has given rise to an American innovation engine that is the envy of the world. But with respect to artificial intelligence, the American research prowess that's powered decades of growth and prosperity is at risk. There are two reasons: public researchers' lack of access to compute power and the scarcity of meaningful datasets, the two prerequisites for advanced AI research. To address this problem, in 2020 the Stanford Institute for Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence (HAI) issued a call for the government to create a National Research Cloud (NRC), a close partnership between academia, government, and industry to provide academic researchers with affordable access to high-end computational resources, to large-scale government-held datasets in a secure cloud environment, and to the necessary expertise to benefit from this resource. Congress has responded to this call with its proposed National AI Research Resource Task Force Act of 2020. Investigating possible ways to implement the NRC according to the proposed legislation, the practicum research team will work closely with scholars at HAI to (1) propose ways to power the NRC with rich and easily-usable datasets while complying with important legal issues such as data privacy; and (2) recommend the proper level of government involvement in building and administering the NRC. The research team will draw from student expertise and familiarity with law, computer science, engineering, economics, and other interdisciplinary fields. Student researchers will conduct interviews with private sector tech companies, public sector administrative officials, and academic researchers. Students will also research adjacent federal policies and agencies that seek to stimulate innovation through similar or other means. This practicum will run winter and spring terms with preference for students who can enroll for both quarters. The project seeks students with law, engineering, computer science, economic, and policy backgrounds. Special Instructions: Students enrolled in Section 01 may elect credit for either Experiential Learning (EL) or Professional Writing (PW). Note: To receive PW credit, students must successfully complete the course for at least two units. Students enrolled in Section 02 may elect credit for Research (R). Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
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