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1 - 10 of 161 results for: LAW

LAW 224B: Federal Litigation in a Global Context: Methods and Practice

This course is part of the required first-year JD curriculum. It is an introductory course in the litigation process. Students represent the plaintiff or defendant in a simulated global torts case set in a federal district court that raises complex issues of federal civil procedure. Students plan litigation strategy, draft pleadings, conduct discovery, write short briefs, and orally argue major motions. While developing students' written and oral advocacy skills, the course also focuses on substantive issues of civil procedure and transnational lawyering. Elements used in grading: attendance, class participation, oral argument, assignments in preparation for written briefs (outlines, drafts, research and citation assignments), written briefs, and professionalism. This course is open to first-year Law School students only.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 400: Directed Research

Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final pro more »
Directed Research is an extraordinary opportunity for students beyond the first-year to research problems in any field of law. Directed research credit may not be awarded for work that duplicates the work of a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has registered. Directed research credit may be awarded for work that expands on work initially assigned in, or conceived during, a course, clinic, or externship, but only if the continued work represents a meaningful and substantial contribution to the already existing project, significantly beyond mere editing or polishing. If a student seeks to continue or expand on work that the student initiated previously (whether for a course, clinic, externship, or otherwise) a student must (1) share the initial work with the professor supervising the directed research, to the extent that work is non-privileged, and (2) obtain permission for the expansion from the instructor or supervisor who supervised the initial project. The final product must be embodied in a paper or other form of written work involving a substantial independent effort on the part of the student. A student must submit a detailed petition of at least 250 words, approved by the sponsoring faculty member, outlining his or her proposed project and demonstrating that the research is likely to result in a significant scholarly contribution. A student may petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development" when the work involves assisting a Law School faculty member in developing concepts or materials for new and innovative law school courses. Both the supervising faculty member and the Associate Dean for Curriculum must approve petition for "Directed Research: Curricular Development." Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. Students whose projects warrant more than four units should consider a Senior Thesis or the Research Track (See SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations). With the approval of the instructor, successful completion of a directed research project of two units or more may satisfy the JD writing requirement to the extent of one research writing course (R course). See Directed Research under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Research petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 403: Senior Thesis

An opportunity for third-year students to engage in original research and to prepare a substantial written-work product on the scale of a law review article. The thesis topic should be chosen no later than two weeks after the beginning of the seventh term of law study and may be chosen during the sixth term. The topic is subject to the approval of the thesis supervisor, who may be any member of the Law School faculty under whose direction the student wishes to write the thesis and who is willing to assume the responsibility therefor. An oral defense of the thesis before members of the faculty, including the thesis supervisor, will be conducted late in the student's ninth academic term. Acceptance of the thesis for credit requires the approval of the thesis supervisor and one or more other members of the faculty who will be selected by the supervisor. Satisfactory completion of the senior thesis will satisfy graduation requirements to the extent of (a) 5 - 8 units of credit and (b) two research courses. The exact requirements for a senior thesis are in the discretion of the supervising faculty member. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5-8 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 406: Research Track

The Research Track is for students who wish to carry out a research project of a scope larger than that contemplated for a Senior Thesis. Research Track projects are to be supervised by two or more professors, at least one of whom must be a member of the Law School faculty. At least one faculty member in addition to the supervisors must read the written product of the research, and the student must defend the written work orally before the readers. Students will be admitted to Research Track only if they have a demonstrated capability for substantial independent research, and propose a significant and well-formulated project at the time of application. Special Instructions: Two Research credits are possible. Elements used in grading: Paper and as agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 9-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F
Instructors: Goldin, J. (PI)

LAW 411: Directed Professional Writing

Directed professional writing projects involve professional writing, such as motions, briefs, proposed legislation, and congressional testimony, undertaken with the assistance of --- and in collaboration with --- a faculty member. Directed professional writing credit is designed to allow a student, or a small group of students working together, to receive academic credit for their work tackling real-world problems. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Professional Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has di more »
Directed professional writing projects involve professional writing, such as motions, briefs, proposed legislation, and congressional testimony, undertaken with the assistance of --- and in collaboration with --- a faculty member. Directed professional writing credit is designed to allow a student, or a small group of students working together, to receive academic credit for their work tackling real-world problems. Only projects supervised by a member of the faculty (tenured, tenure-track, senior lecturer, or professor from practice) may qualify for Directed Professional Writing credit. It will not necessarily be appropriate to require each member of the team to write the number of pages that would be required for an individual directed research project earning the number of units that each team member will earn for the team project. The page length guidelines applicable to individual papers may be considered in determining the appropriate page length, but the faculty supervisor has discretion to make the final page-length determination. Students must meet with the instructor frequently for the purposes of report and guidance. Unit credit is by arrangement. A petition will not be approved for work assigned or performed in a course, clinic, or externship for which the student has or will receive credit. See Directed Professional Writing under Curricular Options in the SLS Student Handbook for requirements and limitations. Directed Professional Writing petitions are available on the Law School Registrar's Office website (see Forms and Petitions). Elements used in grading: As agreed to by instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Mixed H/P/R/F or MP/R/F

LAW 682H: Discussion: Innovation and Inequality

Throughout history, innovation has been a leading driver of economic growth and has helped lift communities out of poverty, and the importance of knowledge goods to the global economy has only increased with the rise of computing and information technologies. Because many innovations have characteristics of public goods, state intervention is necessary to prevent underinvestment---although the optimal form of intervention is far from clear. In practice, governments incentivize innovation and allocate access to knowledge goods through a variety of mechanisms, including intellectual property, direct funding through grants and national laboratories, tax incentives, and innovation inducement prizes. In this discussion group, we will examine how these bodies of law are used to both reinforce and subvert existing power structures and inequalities, including issues related to gender, race, geography, and income. Spring Quarter. Class meeting dates: Five Mondays from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance at all sessions and participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F

LAW 682L: Discussion: The Ethical Robot

We will consider the developing legal and ethical problems of robots and artificial intelligence (AI), particularly self-directed and learning AIs. How do self-driving cars value human lives? How do we trade off accuracy against other values in predictive algorithms? And how can courts and legislatures set legal rules robots can understand and obey? Spring Quarter. Meeting Dates: TBD. DISCUSSIONS IN ETHICAL & PROFESSIONAL VALUES COURSES RANKING FORM: To apply for this course, 2L, 3L and Advanced Degree students must complete and submit a Ranking Form available on the SLS website (click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class Participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Law Mandatory P/R/F
Instructors: Lemley, M. (PI)

LAW 802: TGR: Dissertation

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 0 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: TGR

LAW 805Z: Policy Practicum: Rethinking INTERPOL's Governance Model

Designing a Policy Framework to Facilitate Information Exchange between INTERPOL and Private Sector. Today, the international community faces increasingly complex security challenges arising from transnational criminal activities. Effective international cooperation among national police agencies is critical in combatting cross-boundary criminal threats like terrorism, human and drug trafficking, and cybercrime. INTERPO---the world's largest international police organization---has aggressively worked to counter criminal networks across the globe by facilitating international police cooperation through global information sharing via its criminal databases. To conduct cross-border investigations and tackle organized crime, the law enforcement agencies around the globe can instantly access millions of records on fingerprints, DNA, stolen motor vehicles, firearms, and travel documents stored in INTERPOL's databases. Only the designated law enforcement agencies from INTERPOL's member countries are authorized to share and add information to these databases. Advances in digital technologies and proliferation of communication platforms have created new challenges for the law enforcement. Criminal actors increasingly use private corporate entities, like Internet Service Providers, other telecommunications entities, and social media platforms, to coordinate criminal activities, such as trafficking in persons, terrorism, or cybercrime. Those private sector actors also are potentially critical repositories of information about criminal activity, including communications about members of criminal networks and financial information. Effective law enforcement operations accordingly often depend on information exchange with private sector. Law enforcement authorities face difficulty in effectively accessing, analyzing, and utilizing information from private sector actors in third countries. INTERPOL strives to innovate to adequately respond to the evolving threat landscape and remain at the forefront of global policing efforts. Therefore, it is committed to reviewing and improving its policies on collecting, handling, and sharing data from private sector sources, particularly sources in the technology industry. Under the supervision of the faculty, students in this practicum will work with INTERPOL to enhance its role in cooperating with private sector actors to better fight cyber-crime, terrorism, and other forms of transnational crime. Students will conduct comparative analysis on how select INTERPOL member countries and other relevant international law enforcement agencies exchange information with private sector while safeguarding privacy and protecting civil liberties. Based on this in-depth comparative research, the team will then propose a policy guidance for INTERPOL on information exchange with private sector. This practicum takes place for two quarters (Fall and Winter). Although students may enroll for either one or both quarters, preference is given to students who agree to enroll for both quarters. Students will work directly with INTERPOL clients (via video-conferencing and email) and may have opportunities to travel to INTERPOL headquarters in Lyon over the Spring Break for meetings with clients to develop our policy guidance and provide policy briefings. Selected students in the practicum may also have the opportunity to pursue internships and/or externships at the Office of Legal Affairs, INTERPOL General Secretariat in Lyon, France and/or at INTERPOL Global Complex for Innovation in Singapore. This Practicum is open to students from the Law School (both JDs/LLMs/JSMs/JSDs), the Graduate School of Business, International Policy Studies, the School of Communications, the Computer Science Department, and other graduate students outside of the SLS. Practicum will meet weekly on Wednesdays, from 9:00-10:30 am and hold regular discussion sessions with senior INTERPOL officials via VCT. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Class participation, Written Assignments, Oral Briefings, Final Paper. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Policy lab is offered for three units. Students may enroll in this policy lab for one or two units only in agreement with the instructors. In Spring Quarter, the policy lab is offered for one or two units. Cross-listed with International Policy ( INTLPOL 255) in Autumn and Winter.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail

LAW 806N: Policy Practicum: The Future of Algorithms: Navigating Legal, Social and Policy Challenges

Clients: (1) Stanford Machine Learning Group (https://stanfordmlgroup.github.io/); (2) the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford ( https://cars.stanford.edu/); and (3) the Computational Policy Lab ( https://policylab.stanford.edu/). Although much of the media attention surrounding artificial intelligence (AI) tends to focus on the advances being made in industry, major breakthroughs in the field often begin at the university level. Stanford is among the global leaders in this regard. All across campus, teams led by preeminent researchers are deploying projects that apply cutting-edge AI systems to complex and highly challenging social, technical and policy problems. Stanford has pioneered projects ranging from systems aimed at improving palliative care outcomes, to those aimed at improving the ethical decision-making of autonomous vehicles, to those that shape critical decisions in the criminal justice system. Yet the successful deployment of these projects in the real-world is de more »
Clients: (1) Stanford Machine Learning Group (https://stanfordmlgroup.github.io/); (2) the Center for Automotive Research at Stanford ( https://cars.stanford.edu/); and (3) the Computational Policy Lab ( https://policylab.stanford.edu/). Although much of the media attention surrounding artificial intelligence (AI) tends to focus on the advances being made in industry, major breakthroughs in the field often begin at the university level. Stanford is among the global leaders in this regard. All across campus, teams led by preeminent researchers are deploying projects that apply cutting-edge AI systems to complex and highly challenging social, technical and policy problems. Stanford has pioneered projects ranging from systems aimed at improving palliative care outcomes, to those aimed at improving the ethical decision-making of autonomous vehicles, to those that shape critical decisions in the criminal justice system. Yet the successful deployment of these projects in the real-world is deeply intertwined with questions of regulation and legal liability that push existing doctrinal boundaries---from IP to health regulation to due process and civil rights---to their limits. This policy lab seeks to engage with some of the most challenging legal questions and opportunities presented by these emerging technologies. We will work closely with some of Stanford's leading research teams to help them navigate the murky---oftentimes uncharted---legal, regulatory, ethical, and policy waters surrounding the deployment of novel AI applications. In doing so, we will provide extensive legal research support, collaboratively strategize and design deployments, help innovators evaluate and pilot new applications, and ultimately expand access to transformative technologies for populations in serious need. Students will work primarily with clients from Stanford departments at the forefront of studying, developing and deploying AI systems: (1) the Computer Science Department's Stanford Machine Learning Group, led by Andrew Ng (https://stanfordmlgroup.github.io/); (2) the Mechanical Engineering Department's Center for Automotive Research at Stanford, led by Chris Gerdes and Stephen Zoepf ( https://cars.stanford.edu/); and (3) the Management, Science, and Engineering Department's Computational Policy Lab, led by Sharad Goel ( https://policylab.stanford.edu/). We seek to build a collaborative team of diverse backgrounds and skill sets to learn from each other and enhance the overall capacity of the research. We encourage students who are interested in tech policy, entrepreneurship, AI, access to justice, and social impact to join us, including upper-division and graduate students from Law, Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, MS&E, Public Policy, and the social sciences. Students interested in this policy lab should submit a consent form with a resume and statement of interest to be reviewed by Professor Malone. Law students wishing to undertake R credit will perform additional research for a white paper analyzing the issues and results of the collective research. R credit is possible only by consent of the instructor. After the term begins, and with the consent of the instructor, students accepted into the course may transfer from section (01) into section (02), which meets the R requirement. The practicum is offered for 2 to 3 units in Winter Quarter. Students enrolled in the Winter Quarter practicum may also enroll in the practicum for one unit in Spring Quarter with instructor consent. NOTE: Students may not count more than a combined total of eight units of directed research projects and policy lab practica toward graduation unless the additional counted units are approved in advance by the Petitions Committee. Such approval will be granted only for good cause shown. Even in the case of a successful petition for additional units, a student cannot receive a letter grade for more than eight units of independent research (Policy Lab practicum, Directed Research, Senior Thesis, and/or Research Track). Any units taken in excess of eight will be graded on a mandatory pass basis. For detailed information, see "Directed Research/Policy Labs" in the SLS Student Handbook. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
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