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1 - 10 of 16 results for: JEWISHST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

JEWISHST 53: Exploring Jewish Spirituality (RELIGST 53)

It was once accepted as fact that Judaism is, at its core, a rational religion devoid of any authentic mystical tradition. But the past century of scholarship has reversed this claim, demonstrating that the spiritual life has been integral to Judaism's vital heart since ancient times. This yearning for a direct immediate experience of God's Presence, a longing to grasp the mysteries of the human soul and know the inner dynamics of the Divine realm, has taken on many different forms across the centuries. nnThis course will introduce students to the major texts¿from theological treatises to poems and incantations¿and core ideas of Jewish mysticism and spirituality, tracking their development from the Hebrew Bible to the dawn of modernity. Close attention will be paid to the historical context of these sources, and we will also engage with broader methodological approaches¿from phenomenology to philology¿regarding the academic study of religion and the comparative consideration of mystici more »
It was once accepted as fact that Judaism is, at its core, a rational religion devoid of any authentic mystical tradition. But the past century of scholarship has reversed this claim, demonstrating that the spiritual life has been integral to Judaism's vital heart since ancient times. This yearning for a direct immediate experience of God's Presence, a longing to grasp the mysteries of the human soul and know the inner dynamics of the Divine realm, has taken on many different forms across the centuries. nnThis course will introduce students to the major texts¿from theological treatises to poems and incantations¿and core ideas of Jewish mysticism and spirituality, tracking their development from the Hebrew Bible to the dawn of modernity. Close attention will be paid to the historical context of these sources, and we will also engage with broader methodological approaches¿from phenomenology to philology¿regarding the academic study of religion and the comparative consideration of mysticism in particular.nnThis course assumes no prior background of Judaism or any other religious traditions. All readings will be made available in English. Students are, however, invited to challenge themselves with the ¿optional/advanced¿ readings of sources both primary and secondary. Pending interest, students with facility in the original languages (Hebrew or Aramaic) will be given the opportunity to do so.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Mayse, E. (PI)

JEWISHST 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture (CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B)

(Same as HISTORY 185B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 185B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 101B: First-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter (AMELANG 128B)

Continuation of AMELANG 128A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 102B: Second-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter (AMELANG 129B)

Continuation of AMELANG 129A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 129A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 104B: First-Year Yiddish, Second Quarter (AMELANG 140B)

Continuation of AMELANG 140A. Prerequisite: AMELANG.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Levitow, J. (PI)

JEWISHST 105: Hebrew Forum (AMELANG 131B)

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May repeat for credit
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 127D: Readings in Talmudic Literature (JEWISHST 227D, RELIGST 170D)

Readings of Talmudic texts. Some knowledge of Hebrew is preferred, but not necessary. The goal of the ongoing workshop is to provide Stanford students with the opportunity to engage in regular Talmud study, and to be introduced to a variety of approaches to studying Talmudic texts and thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

JEWISHST 147B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (COMPLIT 127B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World: The Jewish Present and Past in Film, Television and Popular Culture (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, REES 185B)

(Same as HISTORY 85B.) This course explores the full expanse of Jewish life today and in the recent past. The inner workings of religious faith, the content of Jewish identify shorn of belief, the interplay between Jewish powerlessness and influence, the myth and reality of Jewish genius, the continued pertinence of antisemitism, the rhythms of Jewish economic life ¿ all these will be examined in weekly lectures, classroom discussion, and with the use of a widely diverse range of readings, films, and other material. Explored in depth will the ideas and practices of Zionism, the content of contemporary secularism and religious Orthodoxy, the impact Holocaust, the continued crisis facing Israel and the Palestinians. Who is to be considered Jewish, in any event, especially since so many of the best known (Spinoza, Freud, Marx) have had little if anything to do with Jewish life with their relationships to it indifferent, even hostile?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 199B: Directed Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter

For intermediate or advanced students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Baker, Z. (PI)
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