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1 - 10 of 14 results for: JEWISHST ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

JEWISHST 85B: Jews in the Contemporary World: The American Jewish Present & Past in Popular Culture, Film, & TV (CSRE 85B, HISTORY 85B, REES 85B)

( HISTORY 85B is 3 units; HISTORY 185B is 5 units.) Who are American Jews as depicted in popular media-- film, television, etc.-- since the Second World War? How are their religion, politics, mores, and practices represented and what ways, if at all, do such portraits reflect historical trends among Jews and society in general? What can be learned from film or tv about Jewish identity, notions of Jewish power and powerlessness, communal cohesiveness and assimilation, sexuality and the wages of intermarriage or race?
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 101B: First-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter (AMELANG 128B)

Continuation of AMELANG 128A. Prerequisite: Placement Test, AMELANG 128A.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

JEWISHST 102B: Second-Year Hebrew, Second Quarter (AMELANG 129B)

Continuation of AMELANG 129A. Sequence integrating culture and language. Emphasis is on proficiency in oral and written discourse including presentational language and socio culturally appropriate discourse in formal and informal, academic, and professional contexts. Prerequisite: Placement Test, Hebrew 129A.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Porat, G. (PI)

JEWISHST 104: Hebrew Forum (AMELANG 131A)

Intermediate and advanced level. Biweekly Hebrew discussion on contemporary issues with Israeli guest speakers. Vocabulary enhancement. Focus on exposure to academic Hebrew. May be repeat for credit up to 4 times
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 104B: First-Year Yiddish, Second Quarter (AMELANG 140B)

Continuation of AMELANG 140A. Prerequisite: AMELANG.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

JEWISHST 106: Reflection on the Other: The Arab Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film (AMELANG 126, COMPLIT 145)

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views. Guest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

JEWISHST 155D: Jewish American Literature and Film (AMSTUD 145D, ENGLISH 145D, REES 145D)

From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnati more »
From its inception, Jewish-American literature has taken as its subject as well as its context the idea of Jewishness itself. Jewish culture is a diasporic one, and for this reason the concept of Jewishness differs from country to country and across time. What stays remarkably similar, though, is Jewish self-perception and relatedly Jewish literary style. This is as true for the first-generation immigrant writers like Isaac Bashevis Singer and Anzia Yezierska who came to the United States from abroad as it is for their second-generation children born in the United States, and the children of those children. In this course, we will consider the difficulties of displacement for the emigrant generation and their efforts to sustain their cultural integrity in the multicultural American environment. We'll also examine the often comic revolt of their American-born children and grandchildren against their (grand-)parents nostalgia and failure to assimilate. Only by considering these transnational roots can one understand the particularity of the Jewish-American novel in relation to mainstream and minority American literatures. In investigating the link between American Jewish writers and their literary progenitors, we will draw largely but not exclusively from Russia and the countries of Eastern Europe.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

JEWISHST 185B: Jews in the Contemporary World:  The American Jewish Present & Past in Popular Culture,  Film, & TV (CSRE 185B, HISTORY 185B, HISTORY 385C, REES 185B, SLAVIC 183)

( HISTORY 185B is 5 units; HISTORY 85B IS 3 units.) Who are American Jews as depicted in popular media -- film, television, etc. -- since the Second World War? How are their religion, politics, mores, and practices represented and what ways, if at all, do such portraits reflect historical trends among Jews and society in general? What can be learned from film or tv about Jewish identity, notions of Jewish power and powerlessness, communal cohesiveness and assimilation, sexuality and the wages of intermarriage or race?
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

JEWISHST 199B: Directed Reading in Yiddish, Second Quarter

For intermediate or advanced students. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Baker, Z. (PI)

JEWISHST 215: Understanding Jews (AMSTUD 215)

This discussion-based course will give students an opportunity to explore the constellation of religious, ethnic, national, cultural, artistic, spiritual, and political forces that shape Jewish life in the 21st century. Drawing on historical documents, classical texts, and contemporary events, this course will give students from any background an opportunity to ask hard questions, deepen their own understandings, and challenge their conceptions of what makes Jewish life ¿Jewish.¿ No matter where you went for Sunday school ¿ church, synagogue, the woods, or nowhere at all ¿ this course is a chance to question what you know, and interrogate how you came to know what you know about Jews, Judaism, and Jewish culture.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Kelman, A. (PI)
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