2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 16 results for: INTNLREL ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

INTNLREL 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

INTNLREL 60Q: United Nations Peacekeeping (PEDS 60Q)

Focus is on an examination of United Nations peacekeeping, from its inception in 1956 in the wake of the Suez Crisis, to its increasingly important role as an enforcer of political stability in sub-Saharan Africa. Examines the practice of "classic" peacekeeping as it developed during the Cold War, the rise and fall of "second-generation" peacekeeping, and the reemergence of a muscular form of peacekeeping in sub-Saharan Africa more recently. Topics include the basic history of the United Nations since 1945, he fundamentals of the United Nations Charter, and the historical trajectory of U.N. peaeckeeping and the evolving arguments of its proponents and critics over the years.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED

INTNLREL 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

INTNLREL 110C: America and the World Economy (POLISCI 110C, POLISCI 110X)

Examination of contemporary US foreign economic policy. Areas studied: the changing role of the dollar; mechanism of international monetary management; recent crises in world markets including those in Europe and Asia; role of IMF, World Bank and WTO in stabilizing world economy; trade politics and policies; the effects of the globalization of business on future US prosperity. Political Science majors taking this course for WIM credit should enroll in POLISCI 110C.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI

INTNLREL 122: Introduction to European Studies (POLISCI 213E)

This course offers an introduction to major topics in the study of historical and contemporary Europe. We focus on European politics, economics and culture. First, we study what makes Europe special, and how its distinct identity has been influenced by its history. Next, we analyze Europe's politics. We study parliamentary government and proportional representation electoral systems, and how they affect policy. Subsequently, we examine the challenges the European economy faces. We further study the European Union and transatlantic relations.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Crombez, C. (PI)

INTNLREL 135A: International Environmental Law and Policy: Oceans and Climate Change

This seminar offers an introduction to International Environmental Law, with a strong emphasis on oceans and climate change, its underlying principles, how it is developed and implemented, and the challenges of enforcing it. We will focus on oceans and climate change, exploring the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention (UNCLOS) and the United Nations Framework Convention for Climate Change (UNFCCC). We will explain why these agreements are described as ¿umbrella conventions¿ and how new conventions like the Paris Agreement fit within them. There will be guest speakers, a negotiation simulation, and a legal design sprint focused on re-imagining International Environmental Law.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Chand, K. (PI)

INTNLREL 136R: Introduction to Global Justice (ETHICSOC 136R, PHIL 76, POLISCI 136R, POLISCI 336)

This course explores the normative demands and definitions of justice that transcend the nation-state and its borders, through the lenses of political justice, economic justice, and human rights. What are our duties (if any) towards those who live in other countries? Should we be held morally responsible for their suffering? What if we have contributed to it? Should we be asked to remedy it? At what cost? These are some of the questions driving the course. Although rooted in political theory and philosophy, the course will examine contemporary problems that have been addressed by other scholarly disciplines, public debates, and popular media, such as immigration and open borders, climate change refugees, and the morality of global capitalism (from exploitative labor to blood diamonds). As such, readings will combine canonical pieces of political theory and philosophy with readings from other scholarly disciplines, newspaper articles, and popular media.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-EthicReas, WAY-ER

INTNLREL 140A: International Law and International Relations

International law, as a body of law, performs multiple, competing functions. It serves the interests, and seeks to limit the actions, of state actors. It is also a political rhetoric captured by the oppressed, and a foundation for activism and resistance. The purpose of this seminar is to illuminate this malleable nature of international law, to explain its foundational principles and sources, and to evaluate the contours of its role as law and discourse. Questions that will accompany us throughout this seminar include: What is the character of international legal rules? Do they matter in international politics? How effective are they? What potential and what limitations do they have? In addition to exploring such questions against the backdrop of theories of international relations, we will consider several topics which bring tensions between international law and international relations to the fore, such as use of force, human rights, and international criminal law.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Bachar, G. (PI)

INTNLREL 143: State and Society in Korea (SOC 111, SOC 211)

20th-century Korea from a comparative historical perspective. Colonialism, nationalism, development, state-society relations, democratization, and globalization with reference to the Korean experience.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Shin, G. (PI)

INTNLREL 147: Political Economy of the Southern Cone Countries of South America

This seminar examines the economic and political development of the five countries that make up South America's Southern Cone (i.e., Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, and Uruguay) as well as Bolivia (which was historically part of the sub-region and with which today it has close commercial ties). In particular, the course focuses on the era of Import Substitution Industrialization (ISI), explores the reasons why that model of economic development eventually collapsed and how this contributed to the rise of military dictatorships, looks at the return to democratic rule and the adoption of market-oriented economic policies, and concludes with a discussion of the contemporary situation.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: O'Keefe, T. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints