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1 - 10 of 23 results for: INTLPOL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

INTLPOL 204B: Economic Policy Analysis for Policymakers (PUBLPOL 301B)

This class provides economic and institutional background necessary to conduct policy analysis. We will examine the economic justification for government intervention and illustrate these concepts with applications drawn from different policy contexts. The goal of the course is to provide you with the conceptual foundations and the practical skills and experience you will need to be thoughtful consumers or producers of policy analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 102B or PUBLPOL 303D.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5

INTLPOL 225: Tech Policy, Innovation, and Startup Ecosystems: Silicon Valley, Japan and Comparative Perspectives

This course asks big questions and provides detailed analysis about how governments, policies, and politics can shape technologies, innovation, and startup ecosystems through closely examining Silicon Valley as an economic region and Japan's political economy in a comparative perspective. The course will utilize introduce scholarship about governing and shaping markets, analyses of the Silicon Valley ecosystem, and numerous specific cases of policy areas, technologies, and firms, and it will examine the experience of Japan's technological advances, historical trajectories of innovation, and its recent struggles and maturing startup ecosystem. There are no prerequisites for this course. Each class session will consist of lecture material and active discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kushida, K. (PI)

INTLPOL 231B: Understanding Russia: Its Power and Purpose in a New Global Order (INTNLREL 131, POLISCI 213C, REES 231B)

Russia presents a puzzle for theories of socio-economic development and modernization and their relationship to state power in international politics. The collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 brought into being the new Russia (or Russian Federation) as its successor in international politics. Russia suffered one of the worst recessions and experienced 25 years of halting reform. Despite these issues, Russia is again a central player in international affairs. Course analyzes motivations behind contemporary Russian foreign policy by reviewing its domestic and economic underpinnings. Examination of concept of state power in international politics to assess Russia's capabilities to influence other states' policies, and under what conditions its leaders use these resources. Is contemporary Russia strong or weak? What are the resources and constraints its projection of power beyond its borders? What are the determinants of state power in international politics in the twenty-first century? Includes lectures, readings, class discussions, films and documentaries.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: Stoner, K. (PI)

INTLPOL 232: Foreign Policy Decision Making in Comparative Perspective (POLISCI 242, POLISCI 342)

This seminar will examine how countries and multilateral organizations make decisions about foreign and international policy. The hypothesis to be explored in the course is that individuals, bureaucracies, and interest groups shape foreign policy decisions. That hypothesis will be tested against other more structural explanations of how countries behave in the international system. After a brief review of the academic literature in the first part of the course, the seminar will focus on several cases studies of foreign policy decision-making by the United States, China, Russia, Iran, and North Korea, as well as the United Nations and NATO. Enrollment Details: This seminar is a 5-unit required core course for Master's in International Policy (MIP) students. It is also open to graduate students and advanced undergraduates by way of application. For details on how to apply, please click below on "Schedule" and review the "Notes." The deadline to apply for this course is March 14.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: McFaul, M. (PI)

INTLPOL 238: Social Movements in the Post Spring Arab World

This course analyzes the role of social movements such as labor movements, student unions, women¿s movements, and human rights groups in shaping political realities in the Arab world after the brief period of democratic uprisings 2011-2013. It develops an in depth understanding of the challenges facing social movements in a social environment shaped by patriarchal values and in a political landscape driven by autocratic governments.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Hamzawy, A. (PI)

INTLPOL 240: Contemporary Issues in International Security

This seminar examines crucial foreign policy and defense-related challenges. Emphasis is on understanding how the recent past produced today's challenges and evaluating alternative strategies intended to overcome them. Topics include great power competition; terrorism and other transnational threats; security dynamics in South Asia and the Middle East; nuclear proliferation; disruptive technologies; and the interrelated problem set associated with climate change and environmental protection as well as energy, water, food, and health security. Students are expected to engage actively in class discussions, present on select course topics and write short weekly reflections. Enrollment is by instructor consent only. Enrollment priority will be given to students in the Master's in International Policy who must take this course for the specialization in International Security (ISEC). Non-ISEC MIP students and non-MIP students may apply by sending a one-page document to Chelsea Berkey (cburri more »
This seminar examines crucial foreign policy and defense-related challenges. Emphasis is on understanding how the recent past produced today's challenges and evaluating alternative strategies intended to overcome them. Topics include great power competition; terrorism and other transnational threats; security dynamics in South Asia and the Middle East; nuclear proliferation; disruptive technologies; and the interrelated problem set associated with climate change and environmental protection as well as energy, water, food, and health security. Students are expected to engage actively in class discussions, present on select course topics and write short weekly reflections. Enrollment is by instructor consent only. Enrollment priority will be given to students in the Master's in International Policy who must take this course for the specialization in International Security (ISEC). Non-ISEC MIP students and non-MIP students may apply by sending a one-page document to Chelsea Berkey (cburris@stanford.edu) no later than March 11 with the following information: full name, class year, major, and email address. In the document, please also outline previous associated coursework and/or relevant experience and your interest in enrolling in the seminar. Application results will be announced on March 22.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: McMaster, H. (PI)

INTLPOL 252: Digital Risk: From Cyber to Autonomy

All organizations work with digital systems. Some are simple IT systems like email, while others are a series of complex systems that are AI enabled. These systems don't always behave properly. The risk of failure can sometimes carry major consequences ranging from economic losses to even death. Sometimes an external actor is to blame, and sometimes the algorithm itself. In this choose-your-own-adventure writing seminar, you'll have the freedom to explore a digital risk of your choice through a literature review and original research.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Falco, G. (PI)

INTLPOL 258: Psychology, Influence, and Propaganda

Propaganda has been a tool of statecraft since humans first organized themselves into societies. How do tools such as these convince people to change their attitudes, beliefs or behavior? What factors affect the psychological process related to social influence and persuasion? And how does the increasing importance of digital media as an information source affect these processes? This course will address these issues by focusing on the ways in which misleading and/or patently false information spread in today's information ecosystem, often as a result of foreign adversaries' efforts to shape public perception through the use of propaganda as well as coordinated bot networks and Internet trolls.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Guadagno, R. (PI)

INTLPOL 259: Research Topics in Technology and National Security

Research on technology and national security, especially including but not limited to cyber conflict and information warfare, nuclear weapons, emerging technologies with relevance to national security. Student and faculty member will agree on one or more topics for research, and student will prepare a topic-relevant paper of approximately 4000 words per unit. A longer paper on one topic or two or three shorter papers on different topics are acceptable. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Lin, H. (PI)

INTLPOL 268D: Online Open Source Investigation

This course is a practical introduction to online open source investigation -- internet research using free and publicly available information. The course will cover domain investigations, social media research, image verification, and research into cryptocurrency transactions. The goal of the course is to prepare students for online open source research in jobs in the public sector, with technology companies, human rights organizations, and other research and advocacy groups.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Grossman, S. (PI)
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