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1 - 8 of 8 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMRTS 7W: Community-Engaged Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking - Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HISTORY 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

HUMRTS 103: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTLPOL 280, INTNLREL 180A)

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 109: Slavery, human trafficking, and the moral order: ancient and modern (CLASSICS 118, CLASSICS 218)

Slavery and trafficking in persons in the Greco-Roman world were legal and ubiquitous; today slavery is illegal in most states and regarded as a grave violation of human rights and as a crime against humanity under international law. In recent trends, human trafficking has been re-conceptualized as a form of "modern day slavery. " Despite more than a century since the success of the abolition movement, slavery and trafficking continue in the 21st century on a global scale. The only book for the course is: Peter Garnsey, Ideas of Slavery from Aristotle to Augustine, Cambridge University Press
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HUMRTS 115: Corporations, Human Rights, and Social Responsibility

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Social media companies have faced scandals over user privacy, hate speech, and political manipulation. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. nnn"Don't be evil" (Google's one-time slogan) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course considers: nn-What does it mean for a company to "do good?" Should it care? nn-When does it serve a company's interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? nn-What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? nnnWe will learn through lectures, discussion, and occasional small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide additional insights.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

HUMRTS 196: Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab (EARTHSYS 196A)

The Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab is an intellectual hub and supportive learning community for students engaging in environmental justice and human rights work of any kind. Environmental justice (EJ) advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism, and human rights (HR) center on the notion that all people, by virtue of their existence and regardless of any given status or classification, are equally entitled to fundamental rights and protections. Our semi-structured weekly sessions will foster an open learning environment for students and peer-to-peer learning connections. Sessions will include giving and receiving feedback on capstone or community-based projects, independent research, or other relevant coursework or extracurricular activity. We also welcome students who are new to these topics and would like to learn more. We are open to students of all backgrounds and disciplines at any stage of their research or project work. Followi more »
The Environmental Justice and Human Rights Lab is an intellectual hub and supportive learning community for students engaging in environmental justice and human rights work of any kind. Environmental justice (EJ) advances a positive vision for policies and actions that fight environmental racism, and human rights (HR) center on the notion that all people, by virtue of their existence and regardless of any given status or classification, are equally entitled to fundamental rights and protections. Our semi-structured weekly sessions will foster an open learning environment for students and peer-to-peer learning connections. Sessions will include giving and receiving feedback on capstone or community-based projects, independent research, or other relevant coursework or extracurricular activity. We also welcome students who are new to these topics and would like to learn more. We are open to students of all backgrounds and disciplines at any stage of their research or project work. Following EJ and HR principles, we seek to center local, contextualised knowledge and leadership through ethical research partnerships with community members. To do so, we follow community-based participatory research approaches and decolonizing methodologies. Examples of our work to date include 1) enabling graduate students to effectively bring EJ and HR approaches into dissertation research, 2) supporting campus leaders and directly participating in diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) initiatives, and 3) educating and learning from one another about critical EJ and HR scholarship and anti-racist approaches to our work. Lab interests include addressing inequitable impacts of climate change, advancing decolonial approaches to land and water management, promoting food justice, combatting human trafficking and labor exploitation, promoting fair and just immigration policies, and additional EJ and HR research topics. Note that this lab is intended as an open space for engagement. If you are unable to enroll for credit, but would still like to participate, please email humanrights@stanford.edu.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

HUMRTS 197: Human Rights Careers Intensive

This weekly seminar aimed at juniors, seniors, and graduate students, to support practical exploration of human rights careers. Students will meet alumni and other human rights professionals working in a variety of sectors, and get job-search ready. Each week, a guest speaker will present their unique story to the group, helping you connect your skills and undergraduate experiences at Stanford to long-term, meaningful human rights work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 198: Independent Study or Directed Reading in Human Rights

May be repeated for credit. Students using these units toward the Minor in Human Rights must take for a letter grade. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact humanrights@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

HUMRTS 199: Capstone Project: Human Rights Minor

Students completing a required capstone project for the Minor in Human Rights must enroll in this course for units with their capstone adviser selected as the instructor. Students must agree with their capstone advisor how many units (3-5) their proposed capstone project is worth, and enroll accordingly. This course is open only to Human Rights Minors. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact handacenter@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the your advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
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