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1 - 8 of 8 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMRTS 103: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTLPOL 280, INTNLREL 180A)

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 106: Human Rights in Comparative and Historical Perspective (CLASSICS 116, ETHICSOC 106)

This course examines core human rights issues and concepts from a comparative and historical perspective. In the beginning part of the course we will focus on current debates about the universality of human rights norms, considering the foundation of the international human rights regime and claims that it is a product of western colonialism, imperialism, or hegemony. We will then discuss a series of issues where the debates about universality are particularly acute: gender inequality and discrimination, sexual violence, child marriage and forced marriage more generally, and other related topics. We will also consider the way in which issues of gender-based violence arise in the context of internal and international conflicts.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 107: Understanding the Impact of New Technologies on Human Rights Investigations and Transitional Justice

This course will offer students insights into the philosophical underpinnings of the field of transitional justice coupled with a practical lens through which to study different ways governments and human rights institutions pursue justice, broadly defined, in the wake of mass atrocities or systemic repression. Students will closely examine a number of jurisdictions contemplating or currently undergoing a transitional justice process such as Colombia, Syria, Burma/Myanmar, Tunisia, the Central African Republic, and Iraq with an eye towards understanding the changing nature of human rights investigations and prosecutions. In particular, we will consider how advances in technology have altered the possibilities for international criminal tribunals and justice mechanisms as well as the potential for innovative new mechanisms like the UN General Assembly-created International, Impartial, and Independent Mechanism for Syria (iiiM) to change the field of international justice. Students will more »
This course will offer students insights into the philosophical underpinnings of the field of transitional justice coupled with a practical lens through which to study different ways governments and human rights institutions pursue justice, broadly defined, in the wake of mass atrocities or systemic repression. Students will closely examine a number of jurisdictions contemplating or currently undergoing a transitional justice process such as Colombia, Syria, Burma/Myanmar, Tunisia, the Central African Republic, and Iraq with an eye towards understanding the changing nature of human rights investigations and prosecutions. In particular, we will consider how advances in technology have altered the possibilities for international criminal tribunals and justice mechanisms as well as the potential for innovative new mechanisms like the UN General Assembly-created International, Impartial, and Independent Mechanism for Syria (iiiM) to change the field of international justice. Students will contribute to an ongoing transitional justice process by way of a final project.nnThis is a required course for students participating in the BOSP faculty-initiated program overseas trip to Colombia. Enrollment preference for HUMRTS 107 will be given to students enrolled or waitlisted for participation in the corresponding OSPGEN summer trip to Colombia, however, students who cannot participate in the travel portion are welcome to take HUMRTS 107, as well.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMRTS 108: Spanish Immersion Service-Learning: Migration, Asylum, and Human Rights at the U.S. Mexico Border

This community engaged learning workshop is open only to students who are concurrently enrolled in SPANLANG 108SL: Spanish Immersion and Asylum Law. Students who opt into HUMRTS 108 will have the opportunity to apply their advanced Spanish language skills and knowledge from the class as volunteers with the Dilley Bro Bono Project in Dilley, Texas for one week immediately following the academic term. Students will work directly with detained Spanish-speaking families seeking asylum to prepare them for the credible fear interview (CFI). The Dilley Pro Bono Project will train students to conduct CFI orientations for asylum-seekers and provide guidance on how to prepare them for their interview. This course requires an application process. Please email instructor Vivian Brates vbrates@stanford.edu to get a link to the appropriate web form.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-ER | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Brates, V. (PI)

HUMRTS 110: Global Women's Issues in Human Rights and Health

This course provides an overview of international women's human rights issues presented in the context of a woman's life, beginning in infancy and childhood and moving through adolescence, reproductive years, and aging. The approach to women's human rights is broad, taking into account economic and social factors and particularly the importance of women's capacities to manage their lives in the face of societal pressures and obstacles. Attention will be given to critical issues, such as: discrimination against women; poverty; unequal access to the cash economy, education, food, and health care; and violence. Issues such as maternal mortality, sexually transmitted diseases, violence in the home and in conflict and refugee situations, unequal access to economic opportunity, and sex trafficking will be discussed, with particular emphasis on promising interventions relating to the issues.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Murray, A. (PI)

HUMRTS 113: Women's Activist Response to War (FEMGEN 208B, HISTORY 208B, HISTORY 308B)

Theoretical issues, historical origins, changing forms of women's activism in response to war throughout the 20th century, and contemporary cases, such as the Russian Committee of Soldiers Mothers, Bosnian Mothers of Srebrenica, Serbian Women in Black, and the American Cindy Sheehan. Focus is on the U.S. and Eastern Europe, with attention to Israel, England, and Argentina.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HUMRTS 198: Independent Study or Directed Reading in Human Rights

May be repeated for credit. Students using these units toward the Minor in Human Rights must take for a letter grade. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact handacenter@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HUMRTS 199: Capstone Project: Human Rights Minor

Students completing a required capstone project for the Minor in Human Rights must enroll in this course for units with their capstone adviser selected as the instructor. Students must agree with their capstone advisor how many units (3-5) their proposed capstone project is worth, and enroll accordingly. This course is open only to Human Rights Minors. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact handacenter@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the your advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
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