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1 - 7 of 7 results for: HUMRTS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMRTS 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HISTORY 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HUMRTS 103: Transitional Justice, Human Rights, and International Criminal Tribunals (ETHICSOC 280, INTLPOL 280, INTNLREL 180A)

(Formerly IPS 280) Historical backdrop of the Nuremberg and Tokyo Tribunals. The creation and operation of the Yugoslav and Rwanda Tribunals (ICTY and ICTR). The development of hybrid tribunals in East Timor, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia, including evaluation of their success in addressing perceived shortcomings of the ICTY and ICTR. Examination of the role of the International Criminal Court and the extent to which it will succeed in supplanting all other ad hoc international justice mechanisms and fulfill its goals. Analysis focuses on the politics of creating such courts, their interaction with the states in which the conflicts took place, the process of establishing prosecutorial priorities, the body of law they have produced, and their effectiveness in addressing the needs of victims in post-conflict societies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 114: Human Rights Practice and Challenges in Southeast Asia: Issues, fieldwork, career paths

This course aims to address student interest in the practice of human rights both from the individual perspective, particularly regarding a variety of professional career paths, as well as from institutional perspectives. Courses that focus on particular human rights issues or on the broad international legal framework of human rights are core components of a human rights curriculum. This course, on the other hand, is regionally focused, practice-oriented, and addresses the ways in which human rights initiatives and projects are designed, developed, funded, implemented, and evaluated by the various actors and institutions that make up the complex landscape of human rights work. We will have several guest speakers who have successfully followed different career paths in the UN, NGOs, academia, philanthropy, and development. They also reflect engagement in a number of key areas of human rights practice: gender based violence and gender discrimination; statelessness; freedom of religion a more »
This course aims to address student interest in the practice of human rights both from the individual perspective, particularly regarding a variety of professional career paths, as well as from institutional perspectives. Courses that focus on particular human rights issues or on the broad international legal framework of human rights are core components of a human rights curriculum. This course, on the other hand, is regionally focused, practice-oriented, and addresses the ways in which human rights initiatives and projects are designed, developed, funded, implemented, and evaluated by the various actors and institutions that make up the complex landscape of human rights work. We will have several guest speakers who have successfully followed different career paths in the UN, NGOs, academia, philanthropy, and development. They also reflect engagement in a number of key areas of human rights practice: gender based violence and gender discrimination; statelessness; freedom of religion and expression in an electronic age; justice sector reform and the rule of law; business and human rights; prosecution and accountability for war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity.nnnThe requirements for an effective practice-oriented course dictate that it be of limited geographical scope while at the same time having a regional, and to a lesser extent, a cross-regional perspective. Accordingly, the focus of this course will be on the 10 Southeast Asian nations that make up ASEAN as a region with its own legal and institutional human rights framework. We will also consider some of the ways in which ASEAN human rights issues are connected to its neighbors and, in this case, particularly to South Asia (Rohingya) and China (human trafficking and environmental issues). nnnThe course will be structured around the following 5 main segments:nn(1) Issues: Overview of human rights challenges in ASEAN: What are the most pressing issues (and to whom); how is the human rights agenda defined at the national and regional levels; how are priorities established; what are the obstacles to effective implementation of the agenda? nn(2) Players: The roles of national and regional institutions; national NGOs and human rights activists; national human rights commissions; governmental and regional bodies; international human rights organizations; the UN and its various engaged institutions (UNDP, UNODC, UNHCHR, UNHCR, Special Mandates, Human Rights Committee, etc.); national development agencies and embassies.nn(3) Initiatives and Projects: How are broad national and ASEAN human initiatives developed? How do they come to be incorporated into specific projects (research, training and capacity building, awareness raising and education, accountability, etc.)? How are such projects developed and by whom? How are they awarded, funded and implemented? What is the role of human rights philanthropy? How are such initiatives and projects evaluated? What determines the success or failure of such projects and according to whom? nn(4) Seeking accountability for human rights abuses: case studies on trafficking; gender based violence and discrimination; ethnic, religious, or political conflict and violence. nn(5) Human rights careers at the national, regional, and international levels.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, D. (PI)

HUMRTS 115: Business, Social Responsibility and Human Rights

Large corporations now routinely spend millions of dollars to protect human rights and the environment. Shell Nigeria builds hospitals and schools in the Niger Delta. Nike employs hundreds of inspectors to improve conditions for the factory workers who produce its shoes across Asia and Latin America. Social media companies have faced scandals over user privacy, hate speech, and political manipulation. Other examples abound, across industries and around the globe. nnn"Don't be evil" (Google's one-time slogan) may be one motivation for these companies, but something more mundane is also at work: many companies believe they will do well, financially, if they do good, ethically. This course considers: nn-What does it mean for a company to "do good?" Should it care? nn-When does it serve a company¿s interest to take costly action to address human rights, labor, and environmental concerns? nn-What tactics have activists used to shift public opinion, media frames, and the law, and thereby change companies' incentives? nnnWe will learn through lectures, discussion, and occasional small group exercises. Several guest speakers with experience in business, advocacy, or in between will provide additional insights.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

HUMRTS 197: Human Rights Careers Intensive

This weekly seminar aimed at juniors, seniors, and graduate students, to support practical exploration of human rights careers. Students will meet alumni and other human rights professionals working in a variety of sectors, and get job-search ready. Each week, a guest speaker will present their unique story to the group, helping you connect your skills and undergraduate experiences at Stanford to long-term, meaningful human rights work.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Van Tuyl, P. (PI)

HUMRTS 198: Independent Study or Directed Reading in Human Rights

May be repeated for credit. Students using these units toward the Minor in Human Rights must take for a letter grade. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact handacenter@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

HUMRTS 199: Capstone Project: Human Rights Minor

Students completing a required capstone project for the Minor in Human Rights must enroll in this course for units with their capstone adviser selected as the instructor. Students must agree with their capstone advisor how many units (3-5) their proposed capstone project is worth, and enroll accordingly. This course is open only to Human Rights Minors. Department consent is required for enrollment. Please contact handacenter@stanford.edu indicating your plan and demonstrating agreement from the your advisor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5
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