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1 - 3 of 3 results for: HUMCORE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMCORE 121: Ancient Knowledge, New Frontiers: How the Greek Legacy Became Islamic Science (CLASSICS 47, COMPLIT 107A)

What contributions did Arabic and Islamic civilization make to the history of science? This course will read key moments in Greek and Islamic science and philosophy and ask questions about scientific method, philosophy, and religious belief. We will read Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ibn Haytham, and Baha al-Din al-Amili, among others. What is the scientific method and is it universal across time and place? What is Islamic rationality? What is Greek rationality? Who commits to empiricism and who relies on inherited ideas? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

HUMCORE 122: Humanities Core: The Renaissance in Europe (ENGLISH 112C)

The Renaissance in Europe saw a cultural flowering founded on the achievements of pagan antiquity, a new humanism founded on the conviction that nothing which has ever interested living men and women can wholly lose its vitality, and the foundation of the modern state. We start with those ¿Renaissance men¿ Leonardo Da Vinci, Michelangelo, and Raphael. We then turn to Martin Luther¿s rejection of Papal Rome and his erection of a competing, Protestant ideal. Montaigne and Shakespeare invent our modern sense of subjectivity before our eyes. And Machiavelli and Hobbes create a science of power politics. Each week, during the first class meeting, we will focus on these issues in Europe. During the second class meeting, we will participate in a collaborative conversation with the other students and faculty in Humanities Core classes, about other regions and issues. This course is taught in English . This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Hoxby, B. (PI)

HUMCORE 123: Beauty and Renunciation in Japan (JAPAN 163A)

Is it okay to feel pleasure? Should humans choose beauty or renunciation? This is the main controversy of medieval Japan. This course introduces students to the famous literary works that created a world of taste, subtlety, and sensuality. We also read essays that warn against the risks of leading a life of gratification, both in this life and in the afterlife. And we discover together the ways in which these two positions can be not that far from each other. Does love always lead to heartbreak? Is the appreciation of nature compatible with the truths of Buddhism? Is it good to have a family? What kind of house should we build for ourselves? Can fictional stories make us better persons? Each week, during the first class meeting, we will focus on these issues in Japan. During the second class meeting, we will participate in a collaborative conversation with the other students and faculty in Humanities Core classes, about other regions and issues. This course is taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
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