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1 - 4 of 4 results for: HUMCORE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMCORE 13: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, FRENCH 13, HISTORY 239C, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

HUMCORE 22: Humanities Core: Everybody Eats: The Language, Culture, and Ethics of Food in East Asia (CHINA 118, JAPAN 118, KOREA 118)

Many of us have grown up eating "Asian" at home, with friends, on special occasions, or even without full awareness that Asian is what we were eating. This course situates the three major culinary traditions of East Asia--China, Japan, and Korea--in the histories and civilizations of the region, using food as an introduction to their rich repertoires of literature, art, language, philosophy, religion, and culture. It also situates these seemingly timeless gastronomies within local and global flows, social change, and ethical frameworks. Specifically, we will explore the traditional elements of Korean court food, and the transformation of this cuisine as a consequence of the Korean War and South Korea¿s subsequent globalizing economy; the intersection of traditional Japanese food with past and contemporary identities; and the evolution of Chinese cuisine that accompanies shifting attitudes about the environment, health, and well-being. Questions we will ask ourselves during the quarter include, what is "Asian" about Asian cuisine? How has the language of food changed? Is eating, and talking about eating, a gendered experience? How have changing views of the self and community shifted the conversation around the ethics and ecology of meat consumption?
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2

HUMCORE 24: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (CHINA 24, JAPAN 24, KOREA 24)

This course considers the political, economic, social, cultural, and artistic effects of the introduction of new technologies and media to modern Japan. Our exploration will encompass printed books and images, language reform, communication technology, serialized fiction and commercial journalism, propaganda and censorship, cinema, comics, animation and television. Through examination of these topics we will investigate a wide range of issues including nationality, ethnic identity, class, cultural identification, gender, sexuality, literacy, imperialism, consumerism, materialism, and globalism, to name just a few. Throughout the course, we will be attentive not only to the ways that new technology and media are represented in cultural materials but also how they are materialized in these products through the acts of adaptation, translation, transliteration, and remediation. No knowledge of Japanese is necessary. All materials are in English. This class fulfills the Writing & Rhetoric 2 requirement. Prerequisite: PWR 1.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, Writing 2
Instructors: Reichert, J. (PI)

HUMCORE 33: Humanities Core: Global Identity, Culture, and Politics from the Middle East (COMPLIT 33, DLCL 33)

How do we face the future? What resources do we have? Which power structures hold us back and which empower us? What are our identities at college in the Bay Area? In 1850s Lebanon, Abu Faris Shidyaq faced all these same questions (except the last one; he was a Christian magazine editor). In this course we will engage with claims about identity, culture, and politics that some might say come from the "Middle East" but that we understand as global. Ganzeer's graphic novel is as much for California as it is for Egypt. Ataturk's speech is about power and identity just like Donald Trump is about power and identity. In Turkish novels and in Arabic poetry, the people we engage in this course look to their pasts and our futures. What happens next? This is the third of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
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