2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 4 of 4 results for: HUMCORE

HUMCORE 111: Texts that Changed the World from the Ancient Middle East (COMPLIT 31, JEWISHST 150, RELIGST 150)

This course traces the story of the cradle of human civilization. We will begin with the earliest human stories, the Gilgamesh Epic and biblical literature, and follow the path of the development of law, religion, philosophy and literature in the ancient Mediterranean or Middle Eastern world, to the emergence of Jewish and Christian thinking. We will pose questions about how this past continues to inform our present: What stories, myths, and ideas remain foundational to us? How did the stories and myths shape civilizations and form larger communities? How did the earliest stories conceive of human life and the divine? What are the ideas about the order of nature, and the place of human life within that order? How is the relationship between the individual and society constituted? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

HUMCORE 112: Great Books, Big Ideas from Ancient Greece and Rome (CLASSICS 37, DLCL 11)

This course will journey through ancient Greek and Roman literature from Homer to St. Augustine, in constant conversation with the other HumCore travelers in the Ancient Middle East, Africa and South Asia, and Early China. It will introduce participants to some of its fascinating features and big ideas (such as the idea of history); and it will reflect on questions including: What is an honorable life? Who is the Other? How does a society fall apart? Where does human subjectivity fit into a world of matter, cause and effect? Should art serve an exterior purpose? Do we have any duties to the past? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Krebs, C. (PI)

HUMCORE 113: Order, Patterns, and Disorder in Early China (CHINA 163A)

This course explores the human impulse of order-making and its limits in the specific context of Early China. Since antiquity, the Chinese civilization displayed constant efforts to understand the natural world and human society, to seek patterns from the numerous and the diverse, and to fathom individuals¿ positions in the world and the proper ways to respond to all its complexity. Such attempts manifested in a cosmology with an emphasis on the resonance between the human and the natural realms, the prescription of ideals for behaviors and morals, the persistent pursuit and celebration of refined patterns in expression, and the state¿s construction of order through policies and cultural projects of standardization. Yet, despite the efforts of order and control, there had always been a strong tendency of anarchy, unveiling how much the seemingly prevailing structures could not contain. The course will probe into ancient philosophy, dynastic histories, literature, and arts to trace thes more »
This course explores the human impulse of order-making and its limits in the specific context of Early China. Since antiquity, the Chinese civilization displayed constant efforts to understand the natural world and human society, to seek patterns from the numerous and the diverse, and to fathom individuals¿ positions in the world and the proper ways to respond to all its complexity. Such attempts manifested in a cosmology with an emphasis on the resonance between the human and the natural realms, the prescription of ideals for behaviors and morals, the persistent pursuit and celebration of refined patterns in expression, and the state¿s construction of order through policies and cultural projects of standardization. Yet, despite the efforts of order and control, there had always been a strong tendency of anarchy, unveiling how much the seemingly prevailing structures could not contain. The course will probe into ancient philosophy, dynastic histories, literature, and arts to trace these efforts of establishing order and their consequences. The materials will also lead us to contemplate the other side of the story: What was left out? What were the restrictions? What if one failed to conform? Were any advantages found in disorder? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

HUMCORE 117: Ancients and Moderns: Africa and South Asia in World Literature (CLASSICS 45)

How might we make sense of culturally significant texts and text equivalents? We'll compare different answers to abiding human questions, such as: Where do we come from? Why do origins matter? What role do different media (written, spoken, otherwise performed, or visual) play in conveying a sense of the past from one generation to another? In what ways is our access to such cultural productions framed by colonial histories, with their discrepant experiences and perspectives? Readings include the Ramayana; the Bhagavad-Gita; Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart; and Chimamanda Adichie, `The headstrong historian'. This course is part of the Humanities Core sequence.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Parker, G. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints