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  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 28 results for: HUMBIO ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HUMBIO 3A: Cell and Developmental Biology

Principles of the biology of cells, embryonic development and pattern formation, biochemistry of energetics and metabolism, the nature of membranes and organelles, hormone action and signal transduction in normal and diseased states (diabetes, cancer, autoimmune diseases), stem cells and immunology. HUMBIO 3A and HUMBIO 3B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are typically required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade; however in academic year 20-21 majors may count courses taken for a letter grade or for Credit (CR).nnPrerequisite: college chemistry or completion of the HumBio Core on-line chemistry lecture series during the fall quarter.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA

HUMBIO 3B: Environmental and Health Policy Analysis

Connections among the life sciences, social sciences, public health, and public policy. The economic, social, and institutional factors that underlie environmental degradation, the incidence of disease, and challenges facing the health care system including high spending and inequalities in access to health care. Public policies to address these problems. Topics include pollution regulation, climate change policy, biodiversity protection, health insurance, health care regulation, health disparities, and health care reform. HUMBIO 3B, with HUMBIO 2B and HUMBIO 4B, satisfies the Writing in the Major (WIM) requirement for students in Human Biology. HUMBIO 3A and HUMBIO 3B are designed to be taken concurrently and exams or quizzes for both sides may include material from joint module lectures. Concurrent enrollment is strongly encouraged and is necessary for majors in order to meet declaration deadlines. Please note that Human Biology majors are typically required to take the Human Biology Core Courses for a letter grade; however in academic year 20-21 majors may count courses taken for a letter grade or for Credit (CR).
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci

HUMBIO 11: Meet HumBio: a lecture series introducing HumBio themes

A lecture and discussion series designed for freshmen who want to learn more about Human Biology - either the major itself or the topics within its realm - by hearing about a HumBio perspective on the public health response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Each week the class will feature a guest speaker, often a HumBio faculty member or alum, addressing three central questions: What do I do? How is it important for protecting or promoting the public¿s health? and What professional opportunities are possible for a person concentrating in my field? The course is not meant to cover a specific body of content, therefore the assignments for the class aim to build fundamental study skills. These include taking useful notes, articulating questions or ideas prompted by the presentations, connecting lecture topics with current events or journal articles, and paying full courteous attention to speakers and peers. There will be no required readings or exams.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

HUMBIO 29G: Gender and Intersectionality in Global Health

Intersectional thinking is increasingly being applied to global health and other academic disciplines as a framework for understanding complex, and often seemingly intractable, challenges to health and well-being. This course explores how gender (e.g. male, female, trans*, non-binary, etc) identity and relationships intersect with other social categorizations, including age and reproductive status (particularly for women), race/ethnicity, socioeconomic class, immigration status, educational attainment, to create systemic advantages or disadvantages that may explain and/or could address poor health outcomes within and across global communities. More specifically, we will focus on intersectional and biological frameworks in the context of cultural gender norms, to explore possible reasons for differences in incidence and prevalence of a wide range of health disparities worldwide. We will also use these frameworks to explore options for health improvement, in terms of both prevention and care/treatment.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 71B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, BIOE 91B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

HUMBIO 88: Introduction to Statistics for the Health Sciences

Students will learn the statistical tools used to describe and analyze data in the fields of medicine and epidemiology. This very applied course will rely on current research questions and publicly available data. Students will gain proficiency with Stata to do basic analyses of health-related data, including linear and logistic regression, and will become sophisticated consumers of health-related statistical results.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 89: Introduction to Health Sciences Statistics

This course aims to provide a firm grounding in the foundations of probability and statistics, with a focus on analyzing data from the health sciences. Students will learn how to read, interpret, and critically evaluate the statistics in medical and biological studies. The course also prepares students to be able to analyze their own data, guiding them on how to choose the correct statistical test, avoid common statistical pitfalls, and perform basic functions in R deducer. Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR

HUMBIO 122E: Reducing Health Disparities and Closing the Achievement Gap through Health Integration in Schools (EDUC 429, PEDS 229)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 122E. Med/Graduate students must enroll in PEDS 229.) Health and education are inextricably linked. If kids aren't healthy, they won't realize their full potential in school. This is especially true for children living in poverty. This course proposes to: 1) examine the important relationship between children's health and their ability to learn in school as a way to reduce heath disparities; 2) discuss pioneering efforts to identify and address manageable health barriers to learning by integrating health and education in school environments.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

HUMBIO 122S: Social Class, Race, Ethnicity, and Health (AFRICAAM 132, CSRE 122S)

Examines health disparities in the U.S., looking at the patterns of those disparities and their root causes. Explores the intersection of lower social class and ethnic minority status in affecting health status and access to health care. Compares social and biological conceptualizations of race and ethnicity. Upper division course with preference given to upperclassmen. Prerequisite: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HUMBIO 128D: Systems Design In Health

Good health doesn't begin the minute someone walks into a doctor's office; it begins in the places where we live, learn, work, and play. The products, services, and environments that we encounter everyday have a tremendous impact on our health. Taking a systems design-led approach developed at IDEO, we will explore public health in the context of culture, business, and design. The course will encourage students to integrate their personal perspectives with a systems-level view, paying particular attention to health equity and the role of creative leadership. Assignments will be a blend of reading and design exercises.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Singer, S. (PI)
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