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1 - 10 of 104 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

(Course is offered for 3 OR 5 units.) Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 3J: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives

Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, EMED 5C, FEMGEN 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 6W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking (FEMGEN 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 9N: How to Start Your Own Country: Sovereignty and State-Formation in Modern History

What does it mean to start a country, or to acquire and possess sovereignty over a territory? This course will examine the historical evolution of fundamental concepts in our international system: state formation, statehood, and sovereignty. Each week will spotlight a case-study in which sovereignty and statehood have appeared greatly confused and hotly contested. These include: the UK-China lease for control of Hong Kong; the US Naval Station in Guantanamo Bay; the corporate state of the legendary British East India Company; and Disney World.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 10C: The Problem of Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110C. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110C.) From the late 18th century to the present. How Europeans responded to rapid social changes caused by political upheaval, industrialization, and modernization. How the experience and legacy of imperialism and colonialism both influenced European society and put in motion a process of globalization that continues to shape international politics today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 28S: Napoleon

This course examines the life and times of Napoleon Bonaparte. For twenty years, Napoleon commanded and captivated Europe, evoking fascination and fear in equal measure and profoundly shaping the course of the modern world. In this course we follow the arc of his career, from revolutionary to emperor to exile, with each week devoted to a different theme of his life and the age in which he lived. Topics include politics, warfare, revolution, colonialism, gender, popular culture, and the arts.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Hay, N. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

(Same as HISTORY 139. History majors and others taking 5 units, register in 139.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Satia, P. (PI)
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