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1 - 10 of 88 results for: HISTORY ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

(Course is offered for 3 OR 5 units.) Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 3J: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives

Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

HISTORY 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, FEMGEN 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 6W: Community-Engaged Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking - Part I (FEMGEN 6W, HUMRTS 6W)

Considers purpose, practice, and ethics of service learning. Provides training for students' work in community. Examines current scope of human trafficking in Bay Area, pressing concerns, capacity and obstacles to effectively address them. Students work with community partners dedicated to confronting human trafficking and problems it entails on a daily basis. Must currently be enrolled in or have previously taken History 5C/105C ( FemGen 5C/105C, HumBio 178H, IR 105C, CSRE 5C/105C). (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 13S: Misfits of the Middle Ages: Persecution and Tolerance in Medieval Europe

Medieval Europe is infamous for its persecutions. In the popular imagination, the Middle Ages were a uniquely unhappy time for Jews, heretics, lepers, witches, and countless other outsiders. But what is the truth about Europe¿s ¿Dark Ages?¿ What was it actually like to be a Jew in medieval Italy, a leper in England, a heretic in France? Who carried out the persecutions, what motivated them to violence, and did they actually succeed? How do the experiences of medieval Europe¿s outsiders still inform our own notions of tolerance, human rights, and inclusion today?
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Baker, L. (PI)

HISTORY 15D: Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 (HISTORY 115D, RELIGST 115X)

( HISTORY 15D is 3 units; HISTORY 115D is 5 units.) This course provides an introduction to Medieval Europe from the fall of Rome to the Renaissance. While the framework of the course is chronological, we'll concentrate particularly on the structure of medieval society. Rural and urban life, kingship and papal government, wars and plagues provide the context for our examination of the lives of medieval people, what they believed, and how they interacted with other, both within Christendom and beyond it. This course may count as DLCL 123, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

HISTORY 18S: Pirates, Captives, and Renegades: Encounters in the Early Modern Mediterranean World

In this course, we will study how mobile subjects, such as (barbary) pirates, slaves, captives, renegades, merchants, and dragomans shaped the history of the early modern Mediterranean. By studying a range of primary sources, including official documents, chronicles, travel accounts, autobiographical texts, objects, and visual materials, we will analyze how people living on the Mediterranean's European, Asian, and African littorals experienced and influenced interactions between regional powers, such as the Italian city states, Spain, Portugal, France, Morocco, and the Ottoman Empire. In order to analyze these accounts, we will employ various historical methods and evaluate what is at stake in understanding cross-cultural/religious encounters and exchanges in the Mediterranean world during the early modern period.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Bazzi, F. (PI)

HISTORY 23S: Sex and Socialism

Among the major promises made by socialism and communism was the liberation of women from an imperialist, capitalist, and patriarchal world. How did these promises hold up in the face of the realities of revolution and state formation? This course explores the relationship between gender, sex, and sexuality within the state socialist polities of the 20th century. Topics include diversity in barricades and workplaces, motherhood and reproductive rights, medicine and sexology, incarceration and state violence, and homosexuality and gender non-conformity.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Signer, M. (PI)

HISTORY 39: Modern Britain and the British Empire

( History 39 is offered for 3 units; History 139 is offered for 5 units.) From American Independence to the latest war in Iraq. Topics include: the rise of the modern British state and economy; imperial expansion and contraction; the formation of class, gender, and national identities; mass culture and politics; the world wars; and contemporary racial politics. Focus is on questions of decline, the fortunes and contradictions of British liberalism in an era of imperialism, and the weight of the past in contemporary Britain.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

( History 40 is 3 units; History 140 is 5 units.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-SI
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