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1 - 10 of 116 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 1B: Global History: The Early Modern World, 1300 to 1800

Topics include early globalization and cross-cultural exchanges; varying and diverse cultural formations in different parts of the world; the growth and interaction of empires and states; the rise of capitalism and the economic divergence of "the west"; changes in the nature of technology, including military and information technologies; migration of ideas and people (including the slave-trade); disease, climate, and environmental change over time. Designed to accommodate beginning students, non-majors, and more advanced history students
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

HISTORY 2N: Food and Global History

What was Indian cuisine like before the Portuguese introduced chili peppers in the 16th century? Why was the tomato incorporated into Italian cuisine in the seventeenth century? How did the industrialization of food production in the modern period change taste? This course will explore global history through the lens of food staples and cuisines. By analyzing the role of food in major global historical developments such as colonization, slavery, and industrialization, students will explore novel ways of historical thinking, gain insight into the many consequences of historical events, and will uncover the deeper histories and contexts of everyday foods. Through presentations, outings to restaurants and analyses of menus, students will begin to view even the most humble everyday foods as springboards to the past.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Rodrigue, A. (PI)

HISTORY 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (FEMGEN 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

HISTORY 10N: Thinking About War

This course examines classic approaches to war as an intellectual problem, looking at how a matter of such great physical violence and passions can be subjected to understanding and used in philosophy, political theory, and art. Questions to be examined include the definition of war, its causes, its moral value, the nature of its participants, its use in the self-definition of individuals and societies, its relation to political authority, warfare and gender, and the problem of civil war.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lewis, M. (PI)

HISTORY 20A: The Russian Empire, 1450-1800

(Same as HISTORY 120A. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 120A.) Explores rise of Russian state and expanse of empire; patterns of governance of a Eurasian empire; strategies and institutions of governance; survey of various ethnic and religious groups in empire and their varied cultures and political economies; gender and family; serfdom; Russian Orthodox religion and culture; reforms and Europeanization of 18th century.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 23N: The Soviet Union and the World: View from the Hoover Archives

This course seeks to explore the Soviet Union's influence on the world from 1917 to its end in 1991 from a variety of perspectives. Hoover Institution archival holdings will be the basic sources for the course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Naimark, N. (PI)

HISTORY 31S: Resistance, Rebellion, and Revolution in Early Modern Europe: Theory and Practice

Europe in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries was characterized by constant and profound political and religious conflict. Laity and lower clergy challenged church hierarchy, subjects challenged rulers, common people challenged governing classes. What constituted legitimate resistance to established authorities? Early modern thinkers developed robust political philosophies to answer this question. This course examines the early modern tradition of resistance theory alongside contemporaneous events and movements of resistance. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Lilje, N. (PI)

HISTORY 37D: Germany's Wars and the World, 1848-2010 (HISTORY 137D)

This course examines a series of explosive encounters between Germans, Europe, and the world. Starting with the overlooked revolutions of 1848 and ending with the reunification of West Germany and East Germany after the Cold War, the course will explore a range of topics: capitalism, communism, imperialism, nationalism, diplomacy, antisemitism, gender, race, and the Holocaust, among others. We will also consider competing visions of Germany its borders, its members, its enemies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Press, S. (PI)

HISTORY 38G: Europe and Its Great Migrations: The Modern Period (HISTORY 138G)

From the "Germanic" people's migrations of antiquity to the global refugee crises of today, migration has left an indelible mark on European society. What are the causes and consequences of periods of "mass" migration? Surveying major episodes in recent European migration history, we will explore how human mobility has historically shaped culture, politics, economics, and society on this continent. Special attention will be given to the 19th century, an exceptional chapter in global migration history that saw some 55 million Europeans departing for the Americas.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hein, B. (PI)

HISTORY 40: World History of Science

(Same as HISTORY 140. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 140.) The earliest developments in science, the prehistoric roots of technology, the scientific revolution, and global voyaging. Theories of human origins and the oldest known tools and symbols. Achievements of the Mayans, Aztecs, and native N. Americans. Science and medicine in ancient Greece, Egypt, China, Africa, and India. Science in medieval and Renaissance Europe and the Islamic world including changing cosmologies and natural histories. Theories of scientific growth and decay; how science engages other factors such as material culture and religions.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Proctor, R. (PI)
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