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1 - 10 of 116 results for: HISTORY

HISTORY 1C: Global History: The Modern Age

Explores the making of our modern world. Investigates the interconnected histories of revolution, war, imperialism, migration, race, slavery, democracy, rebellion, nationalism, feminism, socialism, fascism, genocide, anti-colonialism, neoliberalism, and populist authoritarianism. Analyzing memoirs, novels, films, and other sources, we will investigate how key political ideas have transformed societies, cultures, and economies across the globe from the late eighteenth century through to the present.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Crews, R. (PI)

HISTORY 2S: The Stardust of Empires: History of National Self-Determination

The global map is carved along ethnonational lines. But how did we get here? Why did the centuries' old empires vanish, to be replaced by nation-states? How have populations evolved into nations, gained identity and acquired political sovereignty? What are the competing political forms of nationhood? Will nation-states themselves endure? This Sources and Methods course tackles these questions and more by focusing on the national self-determination phenomenon in the 19th and 20th century Europe and beyond. Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Nurmis, K. (PI)

HISTORY 3D: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 21X, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and evil have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like religious tolerance, voting rights, and wilderness preservation play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Satz, D. (PI)

HISTORY 8: Mass Violence in the Modern Era (HISTORY 108)

Explores the evolution, varieties and logic of mass violence in modern history. Examines social, political, ethno national, revolutionary and religious violence, and efforts to curtail them. Begins with the emergence of genocide as an international issue; proceeds with colonial genocides in late 19th century Africa, and moves to the Armenian genocide in the Ottoman Empire; Nazi and Nazi inspired racial murder; Communist induced mass violence in the Soviet Union and Asia; ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia; the recent genocides in Rwanda and Sudan; and attempts to confront genocides and crimes against humanity in international courts and institutions.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Weiner, A. (PI)

HISTORY 9R: Humanities Research Intensive (ENGLISH 9R)

Everyone knows that scientists do research, but how do you do research in the humanities? This five-day course, taught over spring break, will introduce you to the excitement of humanities research, while preparing you to develop an independent summer project or to work as a research assistant for a Stanford professor. Through hands-on experience with archival materials in Special Collections, you will learn how to formulate a solid research question; how to gather the evidence that will help you to answer that question; how to write up research results; how to critique the research of your fellow students; how to deliver your results in a public setting; and how to write an effective grant proposal. Students who complete this course become Humanities Research Intensive Fellows and receive post-program mentorship during spring quarter, ongoing opportunities to engage with faculty and advanced undergraduates, a small stipend for research materials, and eligibility to apply for additional funding to support follow-up research. Freshmen and sophomores only. All majors and undeclared students welcome. No prior research experience necessary. Enrollment limited: apply by 11/12/18 at undergrad.stanford.edu/hri.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

HISTORY 10B: Renaissance to Revolution: Early Modern Europe

(Same as HISTORY 110B. History majors and others taking 5 units, register for 110B.) Few historical settings offer a more illuminating perspective on our world today than old-regime Europe. Few cast a darker shadow. Science and the enlightened ambition to master nature and society, the emergence of statehood and its grasp for human mobility, bloodshed and coexistence in the face of religious fragmentation, as well as capitalism and the birth of modern finance: this course surveys some of the most consequential developments in European societies between the late fifteenth and the early nineteenth century.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Stokes, L. (PI)

HISTORY 14N: Making the Middle Ages

Through hands-on engagement with Stanford's diverse collections of medieval artifacts-- from grungy coins to lavish manuscripts-- this course offers an introduction to the cultures of Europe and the Mediterranean world from 400-1400 CE. In addition, the course will explore competing contemporary understandings of the "Middle Ages" and the role of the "medieval" in shaping what it means to be "modern".
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Dorin, R. (PI)

HISTORY 22: St. Petersburg BOSP Seminar

Lectures and readings on Russian history as background for the Overseas Seminar to St. Petersburg. Students prepare a research project to complete during the seminar and submit a written report on topic, bibliography and theme.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kollmann, N. (PI)

HISTORY 30S: Séances & Spirits: Science and the Occult during the Long 19th Century

The 19th century was an age of secularism, rationality, industrialization, urbanization, and scientific and technological innovation. But it was also marked by obsession with the paranormal, as people held séances, summoned ghosts, and performed magic rituals. Exploring this paradox, this course will focus on Britain, with occasional forays to America. Using sources like spirit photographs, séance transcripts, and occult objects in the Stanford archives, we will examine the origins, spread, and significance of our modern fascination with the "other world." Priority given to history majors and minors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Temple, M. (PI)

HISTORY 31Q: Resistance and Collaboration in Hitler's Europe

What is resistance and what did it entail in Nazi-occupied Europe? What prompted some to resist, while others accommodated or actively collaborated with the occupiers? How have postwar societies remembered their resistance movements and collaborationists? This seminar examines how Europeans responded to the Nazi order during World War II. We will explore experiences under occupation; dilemmas the subject peoples faced; the range of resistance motivations, goals, activities, and strategies; and postwar memorialization. Select cases from Western, Eastern, and Mediterranean Europe.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Batinic, J. (PI)
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