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1 - 10 of 18 results for: GSBGEN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GSBGEN 305: Impact: Investing for Good

Investing for Good will introduce students to the entire spectrum of purposeful, values-driven, and impact investing. We examine the field from the perspective of an institutional investor (i.e. fund manager, investment advisor, endowment manager, head of a family office, etc). Our goal is to have students emerge with a practical and analytical framework for: 1. evaluating impact and mission-aligned investments across multiple asset classes and sectors; 2. constructing a portfolio using impact as a lens; 3. designing an impact investment company; and 4. understanding the many practical and theoretical challenges confronting this exciting emerging field.We start by exploring some fundamental questions: what is a purposeful or impact investment; can impact investments be defined along a spectrum between conventional investing and philanthropy; whose money is it; what are the constraints and opportunities; how do we (re)define return and/or performance. We briefly analyze impact investing more »
Investing for Good will introduce students to the entire spectrum of purposeful, values-driven, and impact investing. We examine the field from the perspective of an institutional investor (i.e. fund manager, investment advisor, endowment manager, head of a family office, etc). Our goal is to have students emerge with a practical and analytical framework for: 1. evaluating impact and mission-aligned investments across multiple asset classes and sectors; 2. constructing a portfolio using impact as a lens; 3. designing an impact investment company; and 4. understanding the many practical and theoretical challenges confronting this exciting emerging field.We start by exploring some fundamental questions: what is a purposeful or impact investment; can impact investments be defined along a spectrum between conventional investing and philanthropy; whose money is it; what are the constraints and opportunities; how do we (re)define return and/or performance. We briefly analyze impact investing in the context of modern portfolio theory. We then develop a framework for portfolio construction and evaluation across four criteria: risk, return, liquidity, and impact. Through a combination of class dialogues, role plays, and case discussions, we will explore a wide variety of asset classes, impact themes, and investment challenges. A series of team-based investment committee simulations will comprise a significant portion of the course and will provide a significant experiential learning experience.Previous experience in finance, investing, social enterprise, entrepreneurship, or philanthropy is not required, but both helpful and welcomed. While first year students are encouraged to enroll, students who have limited familiarity with the basics of investing and corporate finance are strongly encouraged to purchase David Swensen's "Pioneering Portfolio Management" and cover the recommended chapters in advance of the course. It's is also important to note that this class will require financial modeling and detailed investment analysis.Many of the issues we'll be tackling have no unambiguous answers. Lively discussion and debate will be necessary and expected.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 307: Policy Time

Policy Time is about the policy choices faced by senior elected officials, especially in times of crisis. Our main perspective is American and executive: decisions faced by the U.S. President, Governors, and their advisors, but the lessons can extend to certain international settings as well. We have three main goals (1) building your personal policy approach, in which you will figure out how your own values translate into real-world policy choices; (2) learning what it's like to be a senior policymaker through Q&A sessions with them; and (3) learning about crisis management and leadership in government and policy.One session per week will be either a lecture and discussion of a particular policy issue, or a conversation and Q&A with a past or current senior policymaker. The second session each week will be a small group meeting (6-8 students per group) to discuss policy choices and the lessons presented by the guests in the first session. We will use policy "worksheets" as a tool to f more »
Policy Time is about the policy choices faced by senior elected officials, especially in times of crisis. Our main perspective is American and executive: decisions faced by the U.S. President, Governors, and their advisors, but the lessons can extend to certain international settings as well. We have three main goals (1) building your personal policy approach, in which you will figure out how your own values translate into real-world policy choices; (2) learning what it's like to be a senior policymaker through Q&A sessions with them; and (3) learning about crisis management and leadership in government and policy.One session per week will be either a lecture and discussion of a particular policy issue, or a conversation and Q&A with a past or current senior policymaker. The second session each week will be a small group meeting (6-8 students per group) to discuss policy choices and the lessons presented by the guests in the first session. We will use policy "worksheets" as a tool to focus your thought process, frame the small-group discussions, and drive you to make hard choices. You will write 5-10 weekly short memos to explain your choices.Each week will cover a different policy topic. Likely topics include immigration reform, climate change, debt reduction, and the role of the corporation in a capitalist economy. Our exact topic schedule is flexible based on current events and guest speaker availability.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 309: Real Estate Finance: Politics, Regulation, and Technology

Political gamesmanship, financial crises, and financial innovation come hand-in-hand with real estate finance, which has played a central role in the rise and fall of economies, financial institutions, and the lives of ordinary Americans. This course explores these issues in depth. We examine the past, present, and future of the complex political economy surrounding real estate finance, its impact on markets, and the business challenges and opportunities arising from it, both domestically and abroad, before and after the financial crisis. We then tackle recent trends like the rise of shadow banks, fintech, and proptech. Through a mix of speakers, case studies, and hands-on exercises, we examine the problems these industries are solving and creating.Greg Buchak is an Assistant Professor in the Finance group at Stanford. He received his PhD in financial economics and JD in law from the University of Chicago. His research focuses on the industrial organization of financial intermediation more »
Political gamesmanship, financial crises, and financial innovation come hand-in-hand with real estate finance, which has played a central role in the rise and fall of economies, financial institutions, and the lives of ordinary Americans. This course explores these issues in depth. We examine the past, present, and future of the complex political economy surrounding real estate finance, its impact on markets, and the business challenges and opportunities arising from it, both domestically and abroad, before and after the financial crisis. We then tackle recent trends like the rise of shadow banks, fintech, and proptech. Through a mix of speakers, case studies, and hands-on exercises, we examine the problems these industries are solving and creating.Greg Buchak is an Assistant Professor in the Finance group at Stanford. He received his PhD in financial economics and JD in law from the University of Chicago. His research focuses on the industrial organization of financial intermediation and it¿s consequences in the real estate industry.Chris Mahowald is actively involved in the real estate investment business as the managing partner of RSF Partners, a series of real estate private equity funds totaling over $1 billion in equity. The firm invests across product types throughout the U.S. During his career, he has focused on value investing with deep experience in distressed mortgage debt. He also teaches real estate investment at the GSB ( GSBGEN 306: Real Estate Investment).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 310: The Impact of AI on Productivity and Personal Performance

There is no denying that we are already in the AI-era, and though it may seem like a bit of overhyped technology to some, the truth is that around 90% of tech executives are currently working to expand AI¿s capabilities. Whether you plan to directly work with it or not, AI will undoubtedly have a large business, social, and economic impact as it becomes more and more advanced, bringing about the so-called ¿future of work.¿ This course invites guest speakers at the forefront of AI use to speak with you, so that regardless of prior experience or knowledge, you gain the expertise needed to grasp AI implications for your business career. Our speakers range from serial entrepreneurs to leaders within well-known companies, all aimed at offering valuable insights on many of the pertinent questions being asked today about AI. For example, how should a company change its internal and external strategy to take advantage of evolving AI and big data? Has COVID quickened the adoption or investment more »
There is no denying that we are already in the AI-era, and though it may seem like a bit of overhyped technology to some, the truth is that around 90% of tech executives are currently working to expand AI¿s capabilities. Whether you plan to directly work with it or not, AI will undoubtedly have a large business, social, and economic impact as it becomes more and more advanced, bringing about the so-called ¿future of work.¿ This course invites guest speakers at the forefront of AI use to speak with you, so that regardless of prior experience or knowledge, you gain the expertise needed to grasp AI implications for your business career. Our speakers range from serial entrepreneurs to leaders within well-known companies, all aimed at offering valuable insights on many of the pertinent questions being asked today about AI. For example, how should a company change its internal and external strategy to take advantage of evolving AI and big data? Has COVID quickened the adoption or investment of AI? Is an AI product/tool a worthy investment in the first place (even after COVID), and how would one go about determining that? Spread out in between these guest speakers are Socratic seminars to review and explore nuance with classmates, with grading focused around three written memos, one consulting-like group project, and class participation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Shaw, K. (PI)

GSBGEN 312: I'm Just a Bill

This is a class on how public policy gets made at the highest levels of the federal government. In the first part of the quarter, lectures and discussions lead in to classroom simulations, in which students role-play as advisors to a U.S. president. You will learn how to analyze policy problems and design solutions, taking into account the multi-dimensional aspects of making federal policy and the many constraints upon those decisions. The second part of the class is a multi-week role-playing legislative simulation. Students will role-play as Members of the House of Representatives and Senate, or as senior advisors to a president. You will participate in legislative debate, voting, offering amendments, and extensive policy and legislative negotiation, with the goal of enacting a new law. As this course requires extensive in-person interaction, students will be required to physically attend every class session that meets in-person. Zoom participation will be all-or-nothing for all students in the class, as determined by the instructor. There is no option to participate virtually when the rest of the class is meeting in person.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 315: Strategic Communication

Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensu more »
Business leaders have marketing strategies, expansion strategies, finance strategies, even exit strategies. Successful leaders, however, also have communication strategies. This course will explore how individuals and organizations can develop and execute effective communication strategies for a variety of business settings. This course introduces the essentials of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, message construction and delivery. Deliverables will include written documents and oral presentations and you will present both individually and in a team. You will receive feedback to improve your communication effectiveness. This practical course helps students develop confidence in their speaking and writing through weekly presentations and assignments, lectures and discussions, guest speakers, simulated activities, and videotaped feedback. An important feature of this course is that there are two faculty members working in concert to ensure that students get rigorous and individualized coaching and feedback. In this course you will learn to: - Create communication strategies at an individual and organizational level - Develop clearly organized and effective presentations and documents - Diagnose and expand your personal writing and oral delivery style - Adapt your delivery style to different material and audiences - Enhance oral delivery through effective visual aids Students at all levels of comfort and expertise with public speaking and business writing will benefit from this course.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 317: Reputation Management: Strategies for Successful Communicators

Successful leaders have to conceive, author, rebuild, pivot, differentiate, and finally maintain a personal reputation to make a lasting, recognizable and powerful identity. Reputation Management will explore how you can effectively communicate to create, adapt and maintain your personal reputation. Your reputation remains fluid as you navigate your career decisions and interact with different professionals along your journey. The course is designed along three interlocking elements: reputation management literature, relevant case studies, and curated guest speakers. Students will learn the fundamentals of strategic corporate communication and the risk of not managing reputation effectively. These frameworks will be extended with specific case studies to illustrate where individuals, groups, and firms have faced the challenge of managing reputation effectively. We will focus on both traditional and virtual components of communication including the relevancy of online reputation managem more »
Successful leaders have to conceive, author, rebuild, pivot, differentiate, and finally maintain a personal reputation to make a lasting, recognizable and powerful identity. Reputation Management will explore how you can effectively communicate to create, adapt and maintain your personal reputation. Your reputation remains fluid as you navigate your career decisions and interact with different professionals along your journey. The course is designed along three interlocking elements: reputation management literature, relevant case studies, and curated guest speakers. Students will learn the fundamentals of strategic corporate communication and the risk of not managing reputation effectively. These frameworks will be extended with specific case studies to illustrate where individuals, groups, and firms have faced the challenge of managing reputation effectively. We will focus on both traditional and virtual components of communication including the relevancy of online reputation management. Finally we will invite well-known leaders from a range of industries who have built and sustained their reputations, through effective communication. Each leader has had to manage their reputations in the public eye, and alongside their peers, supervisors, and employees. Guests will be invited to discuss their conscious and unplanned strategies of how to successfully communicate the kind of person, leader, innovator, or public figure they strive to be. Students will benefit from a rich blend of frameworks, cases, and speakers enabling them to successfully enter the work force and create their own, personal reputations. Students will create a case study drawn from their own experience (or personal network), of a reputation dilemma. A final assignment requires students to research their own reputation history by projecting what they think their reputation is, creating their own survey for friends, colleagues and employers to take, conduct three interviews about their personal reputation with three individuals who have worked closely with them, and then synthesize all this feedback into a cohesive paper and short video that reflects their authentic work and personal reputation. Throughout the course students will post at least one blog drawn from class concepts and respond to posts by peers in the class.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kluger, A. (PI)

GSBGEN 339: Negotiation Dynamics in Sports, Entertainment and Media

Negotiation is a central part of business in the worlds of sports and entertainment. This course will examine negotiation dynamics and key takeaways for general management from multiple different settings where negotiations had an important role--these will include preparing for a negotiation, the negotiation process itself, contractual outcomes of negotiation and their execution and in some cases litigation. The settings will include negotiations over player and actor contracts, negotiations between leagues and players associations, negotiations between investors and movie companies, and negotiations between content providers (both in sports and entertainment) and distribution partners (such as cable stations, international media companies, and online companies such as Netflix). Each of the six sessions is planned to include at least one and in some cases two guests that have had extensive experience in negotiations.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

GSBGEN 352: Winning Writing

This once-a-week full-quarter workshop will offer techniques and practical in-class exercises for writing better -- better memos, emails, cold-call letters, speeches, feedback for colleagues, news releases, responses to questions from the media and from interviewers, and opinion pieces. Glenn Kramon, an editor who has helped New York Times reporters win 10 Pulitzer Prizes, will teach the course along with accomplished journalists with expertise in powerful, persuasive writing for business. They will provide not only helpful tips but constructive feedback on students' work. They will also share thoughts on how best to work with the news media.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kramon, G. (PI)

GSBGEN 368: Managing Difficult Conversations

This elective 3- unit course is offered to JD law students and other selected graduate students, and to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include rea more »
This elective 3- unit course is offered to JD law students and other selected graduate students, and to MBA students who aspire to improve their ability to deal effectively with difficult interpersonal situations. The course will be taught by William F. Meehan III, the Lafayette Partners Lecturer in Strategic Management, Stanford Graduate School of Business and Charles G. Prober, M.D., Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Health Education, Stanford School of Medicine. The course, which will be case-based, will involve frequent student-to-student and student-to-instructor role-playing in authentic medical interactions and difficult interpersonal situations. Topic-specific experts often will be present to participate as class guests. Relevant principles of professionalism, leadership, and psychology underlie the course pedagogy. Students will be expected to attend all classes unless excused in advance. Class preparation will include reading of assigned cases; analysis of the cases and recommendations as to how to confront specific difficult conversations (consistent with assigned study questions); and reading of assigned background material. It is important that all students participate actively in classroom discussions. For GSB students, 50% of the final grade will depend on classroom performance; the remainder will be based on a final written assignment of 3-5 pages. GSB students will be graded on a Pass/Fail basis. The course will be ungraded for medical students, residents and fellows. All students will be expected to complete the written assignment. Class size will be limited to 40 students per the following: (1) a maximum of 20 MBA students and (2) a maximum of 20 non-GHB graduate students.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3
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