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1 - 9 of 9 results for: GLOBAL ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GLOBAL 30: Sufism: Past and Present (GLOBAL 230)

Sufism, often defined as `Islamic mysticism,¿ is essential for a deep understanding of the inner dimension of Islamic spirituality. This course offers a survey of the development of Sufism from its formation through the modern period. Students will be introduced to the fundamental ideas, practices, and institutions of Sufism. The course will familiarize students with an introductory understanding of Sufism in its historical context and will challenge students to engage critically with the academic debates on Sufism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GLOBAL 101: Critical Issues in Global Affairs

Gateway course for students wishing to pursue a Global Studies minor in one of six specializations: African, European, Islamic, Iranian, Latin American, and South Asian Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Rakove, R. (PI)

GLOBAL 135: Around the World in Ten Films (FILMSTUD 135, FILMSTUD 335)

This is an introductory-level course about the cinema as a global language. We will undertake a comparative study of select historical and contemporary aspects of international cinema, and explore a range of themes pertaining to the social, cultural, and political diversity of the world. A cross-regional thematic emphasis and inter-textual methods of narrative and aesthetic analysis, will ground our discussion of films from Italy, Japan, United States, India, China, France, Brazil, Nigeria, Russia, Iran, Mexico, and a number of other countries. Particular emphasis will be placed on the multi-cultural character and the regional specificities of the cinema as a "universal language" and an inclusive "relational network."nnThere are no prerequisites for this class. It is open to all students; non-majors welcome.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Levi, P. (PI)

GLOBAL 139: History of Philosophy from Al-Kindi to Averroes (PHIL 101A)

The rise of Islam saw a flourishing of philosophical and scientific activity across Islamic civilizations from Central Asia to Spain. Between the 7th to 13th centuries, many of the major philosophers in the history of philosophy lived in the Muslim world and wrote in Arabic. They saw themselves, just as later philosophers in medieval Europe, as working in part in the same tradition as Plato and Aristotle. This course surveys this important chapter in the history of philosophy, examining the key philosophical problems, analyses, arguments and ideas developed by philosophers such as Al-Kindi, Al-Razi, Al-Farabi, Avicenna, Al-Ghazali and Averroes, as well as their views on the role and aims of philosophy itself. We will look closely at their writings (in English translation) on philosophical topics in mind, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and politics.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Al-Witri, Z. (PI)

GLOBAL 191: Undergraduate Directed Reading

Independent studies for undergraduate students under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GLOBAL 199: Capstone Project: Global Studies Minor

Students completing a required capstone project for the Global Studies Minor must enroll in this course for units (1-5) with their capstone advisor selected as the instructor. The course may be repeated for credit, with advisor approval. Students are expected to participate in regular advising meetings with the instructor, and may be expected to give a final presentation on their project at an end-of-the-quarter Global Studies Minor symposium. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GLOBAL 230: Sufism: Past and Present (GLOBAL 30)

Sufism, often defined as `Islamic mysticism,¿ is essential for a deep understanding of the inner dimension of Islamic spirituality. This course offers a survey of the development of Sufism from its formation through the modern period. Students will be introduced to the fundamental ideas, practices, and institutions of Sufism. The course will familiarize students with an introductory understanding of Sufism in its historical context and will challenge students to engage critically with the academic debates on Sufism.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GLOBAL 249B: Iranian Cinema in Diaspora (COMPLIT 249B)

Despite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian Revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them. These films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran. In this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week: What more »
Despite enormous obstacles, immigrant Iranian filmmakers, within a few decades (after the Iranian Revolution), have created a slow but steady stream of films outside Iran. They were originally started by individual spontaneous attempts from different corners of the world and by now we can identify common lines of interest amongst them. There are also major differences between them. These films have never been allowed to be screened inside Iran, and without any support from the global system of production and distribution, as independent and individual attempts, they have enjoyed little attention. Despite all this, Iranian cinema in exile is in no sense any less important than Iranian cinema inside Iran. In this course we will view one such film, made outside Iran, in each class meeting and expect to reach a common consensus in identifying the general patterns within these works and this movement. Questions such as the ones listed below will be addressed in our meetings each week: What changes in aesthetics and point of view of the filmmaker are caused by the change in his or her work environment? Though unwantedly these films are made outside Iran, how related are they to the known (recognized) cinema within Iran? And in fact, to what extent do these films express things that are left unsaid by the cinema within Iran? NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Beyzaie, B. (PI)

GLOBAL 391: Graduate Directed Reading

Independent studies for graduate students under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jessiman, S. (PI)
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