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1 - 10 of 13 results for: GERMAN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GERMAN 120B: Fairy Tales

In this course, we will explore the fairy tale genre both from a systematic and historical perspective. We will start by asking how fairy tales differ from other short prose texts like legends and fables. We will then focus on bigger themes, allowing us to discern differences within this literary form, namely: the fantastic and the real, motif constancy and variation, narration and orality, animality and the human. Over the course of the seminar, we will not only delve into the world-famous folk tale collection of the Grimm brothers, but also the more stylized Romantic "Kunstmärchen" tradition (Goethe, Brentano, Hoffmann). Examples from the later 19th-century (Keller, Storm) and the 20th century (Hofmannsthal, Kafka, Döblin, Bachmann) demonstrate attempts to reformulate the fairy tale tradition by transgressing its boundaries. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

GERMAN 135: German Conversation (GERMAN 235)

This small, individualized course will offer students the chance to work on their spoken expression and critical thinking, in German. Topics will change each quarter but will span contemporary politics and culture, film, literature, and visual arts. The focus will be on speaking German in small groups, as opposed to formal presentations or written assignments. Students will have the opportunity to pursue topics of personal interest, as well as work collaboratively and individually on projects intended to foster advanced communicative skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 235: German Conversation (GERMAN 135)

This small, individualized course will offer students the chance to work on their spoken expression and critical thinking, in German. Topics will change each quarter but will span contemporary politics and culture, film, literature, and visual arts. The focus will be on speaking German in small groups, as opposed to formal presentations or written assignments. Students will have the opportunity to pursue topics of personal interest, as well as work collaboratively and individually on projects intended to foster advanced communicative skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 261: Theorie des Erzählens (GERMAN 361)

This course approaches the history of narrative theory from the German perspective: we will read canonical and foundational texts that have shaped the way we read and study narrative¿from the usual suspects (Gerard Genette, Yuri Lotman, Tzvetan Todorov, Algirdas Julien Greimas) to the (here) lesser known German theorists of narrative forms and literary theory (Frank K. Stanzel, Käte Hamburger, Monika Fludernik, Siegfried J. Schmidt). Alongside these theoretical approaches, we will read two German novels, which we¿ll use as experimental playground to better test and understand how and why literary theory can help us construct models of reading, world-making, human experience, and storytelling. Towards the end of the course, we¿ll switch to the open questions and future of narrative theory: what media of long-form storytelling come after the novel? What do they have in common with, say, the novels of J.W. Goethe, Adalbert Stifter, Lou Andreas-Salomé, or Ingeborg Bachmann? How would we expand narrative theory to include today¿s most important and engaging sites of storytelling (like video games or serial television)? Taught in German.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 332: German Literature 3: Modernity and the Unspeakable (GERMAN 232)

Masterpieces of German literature, drama, and film from the first half of the 20th century. Particular focus on modernism and the crisis of language. What urgent truths (whether psychological, political, spiritual, or sexual) cannot be expressed, and how do art and dreams attempt to speak the unspeakable? Readings and viewings include works by Hofmannsthal, Schnitzler, Freud, Wedekind, Mann, Musil, Kafka, Toller, Höch, Rilke, Schoenberg, Riefensthal, Benjamin, and Brecht. Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Smith, M. (PI)

GERMAN 343: World War Two: Place, Loss, History (ARTHIST 401)

A consideration of how the Second World War still goes on today in the form of haunted absences and vivid representations. Studying literature and art in detail, the seminar will center on some of the places where those absences and representations gather: Portbou, Pearl Harbor, Auschwitz, Guadalcanal, London, Berlin, Hamburg, Rome, Omaha Beach, Peleliu, Monte Cassino, Hollywood. Writers and artists include: James Jones, Georges Didi-Huberman, Walter Benjamin, Eduardo Cadava, W.G. Sebald, Rachel Whiteread, Ingeborg Bachman, Wis¿awa Szymborska, Eugene Sledge, Hans Erich Nossack, Jorie Graham, Gerhard Richter, Dani Karavan, Tom Lea, W. Eugene Smith, Val Lewton, and Terrence Malick.
Terms: Win | Units: 5

GERMAN 361: Theorie des Erzählens (GERMAN 261)

This course approaches the history of narrative theory from the German perspective: we will read canonical and foundational texts that have shaped the way we read and study narrative¿from the usual suspects (Gerard Genette, Yuri Lotman, Tzvetan Todorov, Algirdas Julien Greimas) to the (here) lesser known German theorists of narrative forms and literary theory (Frank K. Stanzel, Käte Hamburger, Monika Fludernik, Siegfried J. Schmidt). Alongside these theoretical approaches, we will read two German novels, which we¿ll use as experimental playground to better test and understand how and why literary theory can help us construct models of reading, world-making, human experience, and storytelling. Towards the end of the course, we¿ll switch to the open questions and future of narrative theory: what media of long-form storytelling come after the novel? What do they have in common with, say, the novels of J.W. Goethe, Adalbert Stifter, Lou Andreas-Salomé, or Ingeborg Bachmann? How would we expand narrative theory to include today¿s most important and engaging sites of storytelling (like video games or serial television)? Taught in German.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 396: German Studies Lecture Series

What's happening in German Studies today? The GSLS invites 3 speakers per quarter to present on their work and research in German literature, culture, politics, and history, offering students an insight into the current field of German Studies and an engagement with topics ranging from medieval fabrics to the refugee crisis. Luncheons are scheduled every first Tuesday of the month. To earn the unit for this course, students will attend the lecture, read 1-2 articles or book chapters written by the speaker of the week, and complete one short 2-page writing assignment (this could be a reflection, a review, a creative assignment, a poetic adaptation of a talk - we'll discuss).
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)
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