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1 - 10 of 17 results for: GERMAN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 120A: Berlin: Literature and Culture in the 20th Century and Beyond

For much of the twentieth century Berlin has been at the epicentre of geopolitics, the Berlin Wall standing as the physical manifestation of a fragile world order. Huge social and political upheavals in the city have inspired much cultural production. Through novels, poetry, films, speeches and more we will examine the Golden Era of Weimar Berlin, the National Socialist period, the Cold War division, reunification, and the contemporary city. Authors include Keun, Döblin, Fallada, Schernikau, Wolf, Brussig, Erpenbeck. Taught in GermanPrerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

GERMAN 135: German Conversation (GERMAN 235)

This small, individualized course will offer students the chance to work on their spoken expression and critical thinking, in German. Topics will change each quarter but will span contemporary politics and culture, film, literature, and visual arts. The focus will be on speaking German in small groups, as opposed to formal presentations or written assignments. Students will have the opportunity to pursue topics of personal interest, as well as work collaboratively and individually on projects intended to foster advanced communicative skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 141C: Gottfried's "Tristan and Isolde" - Your Travel Guide to a Great Novel

Does true love have to break with the rules and norms of society? Gottfried's "Tristan and Isolde," a masterpiece of medieval epic poetry, follows this question through its portrayal of a tragic romance. The course will close-read, analyze and discuss this milestone of German literature, focusing in particular on its notions of love, loyalty, fate, and honor. Later sessions will also include modern adaptations of the Tristan story. Contributions by invited guest speakers and experts will provide different perspectives for us to discuss.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3

GERMAN 185: Understanding International Politics Today: From the German Philosophers to Modern Social Science

This course is being offered in collaboration with Stanford in Berlin, Bing Overseas Study Program. International politics is beset by problems. States go to war. The global economy is volatile and unequal. The human community is divided into multiple nation-states. Some states dominate others. People commit acts of evil. Luckily, we are not the first people to have noticed that international politics is not characterized exclusively by peace and harmony. War, capitalism, racism, and totalitarianism have all been subjects about which German thinkers - many based in Berlin - have made profound contributions over the last two centuries. Do their ideas and arguments stand up in the cold light of modern social science? What can we learn from them - and what do we need to discard? This course will introduce students to perennial problems in international politics from two perspectives: those of key German political thinkers, and those of modern social science. It is structured around five c more »
This course is being offered in collaboration with Stanford in Berlin, Bing Overseas Study Program. International politics is beset by problems. States go to war. The global economy is volatile and unequal. The human community is divided into multiple nation-states. Some states dominate others. People commit acts of evil. Luckily, we are not the first people to have noticed that international politics is not characterized exclusively by peace and harmony. War, capitalism, racism, and totalitarianism have all been subjects about which German thinkers - many based in Berlin - have made profound contributions over the last two centuries. Do their ideas and arguments stand up in the cold light of modern social science? What can we learn from them - and what do we need to discard? This course will introduce students to perennial problems in international politics from two perspectives: those of key German political thinkers, and those of modern social science. It is structured around five core questions: Why do states go to war and what could be the basis for a lasting peace? If war is unavoidable, what is the role of morality in war? How can/should the world be governed in the absence of a world state? How has international politics been transformed by capitalism? What role has been and is played by race and racism in international politics?
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Stephen, M. (PI)

GERMAN 191: German Capstone Project

Each student participates in a capstone interview and discussion with a panel of the German Studies faculty on topics related to German cultural and literary analysis. In prepration for the interview/discussion, students submit written answers to a set of questions based on several authentic cultural texts in German. The written answers, normally in English, should be well-formed and coherent. Within the interview/discussion, students must demonstrate a further understanding of the topic(s) posed, through cogent argument.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Berman, R. (PI)

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 235: German Conversation (GERMAN 135)

This small, individualized course will offer students the chance to work on their spoken expression and critical thinking, in German. Topics will change each quarter but will span contemporary politics and culture, film, literature, and visual arts. The focus will be on speaking German in small groups, as opposed to formal presentations or written assignments. Students will have the opportunity to pursue topics of personal interest, as well as work collaboratively and individually on projects intended to foster advanced communicative skills.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit

GERMAN 283A: Modern Notions of 'The Holy' (COMPLIT 283A, COMPLIT 383A, GERMAN 383A, RELIGST 283A, RELIGST 383A)

This course explores the question, "What may we call 'holy' in the modern era?" by focusing on key writers and thinkers, who in various ways, and in different times raised this question: Friedrich Hölderlin, Hermann Cohen, Franz Kafka, Martin Heidegger, Martin Buber, Franz Rosenzweig, Else Lasker-Schüler, Walter Benjamin, Ernst Bloch, Hannah Arendt, Margarete Susman, Nelly Sachs, Paul Celan, and Judith Butler.nnThis course will be synchronous-conducted, but will also use an innovative, Stanford-developed, on-line platform called Poetic Thinking. Poetic Thinking allows students to share both their scholarly and creative work with each other. Based on the newest technology and beautifully designed, it will greatly enhance their course experience.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum
Instructors: Eshel, A. (PI)
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