2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 20 results for: GERMAN

GERMAN 75N: Famous Last Words

What would you say if you knew it would be the last thing you would ever say? Who would you want to hear your words? Would you want to inspire somebody? Terrify them? Shout your defiance or your love in their direction?nThis is a course about last words the final utterances left as legacies for the world in the face of revolution, war, betrayal, heartbreak, or that simplest of endings, death. We will look at a wide variety of last words, including last words codified as genres¿quotations, suicide notes, epitaphs, dying declarations, Japanese death poems, confessions, and the like as literary devices (last sentences, envois, punch lines, epilogues), and as forms of social or cultural practice (the making of heroes, idols, and martyrs in religious, political, and popular culture). We will look at fictional last words, real last words, last words spoken by heroes, gods, and ordinary people. And we will end the course, each of us, by writing out our own last words imagining what we each would write, if we had to sum up what mattered most to us, and if we wanted some small selection of signs to stand in, as it has for many of the authors we will read, for our life and the legacy of it.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 97: 10 Poems That Will Change Your Life

This course is for anyone who has ever been afraid of poetry, anyone who has ever thought that poems are too difficult to understand, a course for anyone who has fallen in love with poetry before, and for anyone who has used a poem to make a difference in someone's life. You will learn how to read, understand, and if you don't already like poetry. We will read poems from different centuries, different kinds of writers, and different media (paper, computer screens, and even DNA); they will be about loss and love and war and loyalty and bacteria. Some of them will be about you. You will develop interpretive skills that come with this range of poetic forms and structures and will learn how to think about what it means for something to be poetic, whether it is a poem, a Leonard Cohen song, a last minute field goal, or a toilet. Can the poems in this class really change your life? (What would that even mean? We'll discuss.) Maybe; maybe not. But they're certainly going to try.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Pao, L. (PI)

GERMAN 116: Writing About Germany: New Topics, New Genres

Writing about various topics in German Studies. Topics based on student interests: current politics, economics, European affairs, start-ups in Germany. Intensive focus on writing. Students may write on their experience at Stanford in Berlin or their internship. Fulfills the WIM requirement for German Studies majors.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 120A: Berlin: Literature, History, and Politics in the 20th and 21st Centuries

This course explores the city of Berlin through key contemporary and twentieth century prose as well as poems, films, music. Class discussions will focus on Berlin as the stage for crucial events in world history. Topics include contemporary Berlin as a magnet for bohemians and hipsters, migration to Berlin, the fall of the Berlin wall, student movements and radical politics in the city, cold war Berlin, the city under National Socialism, Weimar republic, revolutionary times, and the German Empire. We will read and discuss Walter Benjamin, Rosa Luxemburg, Paul Celan, Alfred Döblin, Hans Fallada, Christa Wolf and others. Taught in German. Prerequisite: GERLANG 3 or permission of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 131: What is German Literature?

"What do the words "German" and "Germany" signify, and how have they changed since the first text in German was written down in the 8th century? What has it meant to read and write in German in the Middle Ages, the Early Modern period, 18th century Weimar, the Napoleonic Wars, Nazi Germany, or the GDR? How can ideas, stories, and poetry from the past be made meaningful for our understanding of our present? This course will approach these questions by giving a brief survey of the evolution, forms, genres, and periods of German literature. Students will read and discuss short literary masterpieces from the "Hildebrandslied" to the poetry of Bertolt Brecht. nThe course follows the chronology of German literature. The single sessions will focus on the ideas most characteristic for the period in question: What is "German"?; Courtly Love and Christian Culture; Reformation and Innovation; Enlightenment and Reason; The Notion of the "Classic"; Exploring Emotion; Nationhood and Revolution; The Aesthetics of Modernism; War and Exile; Division and Reunification. Taught in German.nPrerequisite: One year of German language at Stanford or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 181: Philosophy and Literature (CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, ITALIAN 181, PHIL 81, SLAVIC 181)

What, if anything, does reading literature do for our lives? What can literature offer that other forms of writing cannot? Can fictions teach us anything? Can they make people more moral? Why do we take pleasure in tragic stories? This course introduces students to major problems at the intersection of philosophy and literature. It addresses key questions about the value of literature, philosophical puzzles about the nature of fiction and literary language, and ways that philosophy and literature interact. Readings span literature, film, and philosophical theories of art. Authors may include Sophocles, Dickinson, Toni Morrison, Proust, Woolf, Walton, Nietzsche, and Sartre. Students master close reading techniques and philosophical analysis, and write papers combining the two. This is the required gateway course for the Philosophy and Literature major tracks. Majors should register in their home department.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 199: Individual Work

Repeatable for Credit. Instructor Consent Required
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

GERMAN 230: Foreignness: Defining the Self and Other in Medieval German Literature (GERMAN 330)

Race, class, gender, and sexuality are generally considered key categories for understanding our identity in modern society. But how did people in the Middle Ages define themselves and others? In this course we will survey medieval and early modern German literature, looking at ways in which people grappled with cultural difference and the increasingly global society in which they lived. Topics will include national identity, gender, Jews, pagans, monsters, travel, and crusade. In addition to acquiring a foundation in medieval German literature (800-1600), students will learn to think critically about social identities and the ways in which we make sense of cultural difference. Some course materials are only available in German.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Starkey, K. (PI)

GERMAN 241: African Americans in Germany (AFRICAAM 241J)

In this class, we will wrestle with the question: How have African Americans understood their experiences with race outside of the United States? African Americans have been migrating and circulating the globe for centuries, and it is only recently that scholars have considered the ways in which an abroad experience has been transformative for African Americans. In this seminar style class, we will explore why and how African Americans have used their experiences in Germany to express a new understanding of their Black identity in the United States. We will also explore processes of oversexualization, stereotyping, and translation (of Black culture in Germany) in addition to interrogating the politics of identity in our examination of Blackness in Europe. Taught in English. NOTE: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Watkins, J. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints