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1 - 10 of 16 results for: FRENCH ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FRENCH 13: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (DLCL 13, HISTORY 239C, HUMCORE 13, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

FRENCH 36: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, COMPLIT 36A, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, RELIGST 36X, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as revolution, tradition, and hell have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like immigration, universal basic income, and youth play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these ¿dangerous¿ ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Anderson, R. (PI)

FRENCH 129: Camus (COMPLIT 229B, CSRE 129, HISTORY 235F)

"The Don Draper of Existentialism" for Adam Gopnik, "the ideal husband of contemporary letters" for Susan Sontag, and "the admirable conjunction of a man, of an action, and of a work" for Sartre, Camus embodies the very French figure of the "intellectuel engagé," or public intellectual. From his birth in 1913 into a poor family in Algeria to the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1957, from Paris to the Mediterranean world, Camus engaged in the great ethical battles of his time, from the fight against nazism and communism, from questioning colonial rules to the Algerian War of Independence. Through readings and films, we will explore his multiple, long-lasting legacies. Readings from Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, Kamel Daoud, Mouloud Feraoun, Alice Kaplan, A.B. Yehoshua, Yasmina Khadra. This course is a WIM course. Students will work on their production of written French, in addition to speaking French and reading comprehension. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Ulloa, M. (PI)

FRENCH 132: Literature, Revolutions, and Changes in 19th- and 20th-Century France

This course will explore several important texts of 19th- and 20th-Century French literature, with the aim of following the evolution of the main literary movements during those centuries of important cultural and social changes. We will study texts related to movements such as Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism, Surrealism, the Absurd, the Nouveau Roman in all major genres (prose, poetry, theater, film) and will regularly refer to other arts, such as painting and music. Authors include Chateaubriand, Musset, Balzac, Flaubert, Maupassant, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Apollinaire, Proust, Céline, Radiguet, Ionesco, Robbe-Grillet, Duras, Gary. All readings, discussion, and assignments are in French.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Zurita, V. (PI)

FRENCH 140: Paris: Capital of the Modern World (FRENCH 340, HISTORY 230C, URBANST 184)

This course explores how Paris, between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries, became the political, cultural, and artistic capital of the modern world. It considers how the city has both shaped and been shaped by the tumultuous events of modern history- class conflict, industrialization, imperialism, war, and occupation. It will also explore why Paris became the major world destination for intellectuals, artists and writers. Sources will include films, paintings, architecture, novels, travel journals, and memoirs. Course taught in English with an optional French section.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-SI
Instructors: Daughton, J. (PI)

FRENCH 199: Individual Work

Restricted to French majors with consent of department. Normally limited to 4-unit credit toward the major. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

FRENCH 260A: Transcultural Perspectives of South-East Asian Music and Arts (COMPLIT 148, COMPLIT 267, MUSIC 146N, MUSIC 246N)

This course will explore the links between aspects of South-East Asian cultures and their influence on modern and contemporary Western art and literature, particularly in France; examples of this influence include Claude Debussy (Gamelan music), Jacques Charpentier (Karnatak music), Auguste Rodin (Khmer art) and Antonin Artaud (Balinese theater). In the course of these interdisciplinary analyses - focalized on music and dance but not limited to it - we will confront key notions in relation to transculturality: orientalism, appropriation, auto-ethnography, nostalgia, exoticism and cosmopolitanism. We will also consider transculturality interior to contemporary creation, through the work of contemporary composers such as Tran Kim Ng¿c, Chinary Ung and Tôn-Thât Tiêt. Viewings of sculptures, marionette theater, ballet, opera and cinema will also play an integral role. To be eligible for WAYS credit, this course must be taken for 3 units and a letter grade; WIM credit in Music at 4 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kretz, H. (PI)

FRENCH 292: Romancing the Stone: Crystal Media from Babylon to Superman (ARTHIST 292, ARTHIST 492, FRENCH 392)

This seminar investigates the importance of rock crystal and its imitations as material, medium, and metaphor from antiquity until modernity. The objects examined include rings, reliquaries, lenses, and the Crystal Aesthetic in early twentieth-century architecture and even Superman's Fortress of Solitude. The texts range from Pliny to Arabic Poetry to Romance Literature to modern manifestos.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

FRENCH 307A: Proust and His World (COMPLIT 307)

This course is a chance to read together Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu. This seven-volume novel is a stylistic tour de force, a brilliant meditation on defining elements of modernity, and an eccentric meander through art, history and the self. We will look closely at Proust's narrative edifice, and its poetic achievements. We will augment our reading of the novel with secondary selections that enable us to explore the many themes and questions raised by the work, ranging from fashion as a serious mode of modern expression to the phenomenology of memory to the decadence of French culture on the eve of the First World War. We'll look at the importance of Proust for structuralist and post-structuralist critics of the 1960s-1980s, whose paradigms continue to resonate today. We'll also consider together the interest and limits of a single-author course, and the value of absorptive, "slow" reading in our multi-tasking era. Supplementary readings might include selections from Charles Baudelaire, John Ruskin, Henri Bergson, Gérard Genette, Gilles Deleuze, Eve Sedgwick, Maurice Samuels, and Caroline Weber. Reading knowledge of French strongly recommended.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Cohen, M. (PI)
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