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1 - 10 of 13 results for: FRENCH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FRENCH 87N: The New Wave: How The French Reinvented Cinema

Focus on the French New Wave's cinematic revolution of 1959-1962. In a few years, the Nouvelle Vague delivered landmark works such as Truffaut's 400 Blows, Godard's Breathless, Chabrol's Les Cousins or Resnais' Hiroshima mon amour, and changed forever the way we make and think about movies. Why did these films look so radically fresh? What do they say about France's youth culture in the early 60s? How is the author's theory behind them still influencing us today? Focus is on cultural history, aesthetic analysis, interpretation of narrative, sound and visual forms. Taught in English. NOTE: Class meets Tuesday/Thursday 12:00-1:20pm; film screenings Monday 6:00-8:50pm in room 540-108
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Alduy, C. (PI)

FRENCH 120: Coffee and Cigarettes: The Making of French Intellectual Culture

Examines a quintessential French figure "l'intellectuel" from a long-term historical perspective. We will observe how this figure was shaped over time by such other cultural types as the writer, the artist, the historian, the philosopher, and the moralist. Proceeding in counter-chronological order, from the late 20th to the 16th century, we will read a collection of classic French works. As this course is a gateway for French studies, special emphasis will be placed on oral proficiency. Taught in French; readings in French.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

FRENCH 130: Introduction to Medieval and Renaissance French Literature

Gender, race and religion are at the heart of our contemporary political and societal debates. How to build a nation and how to live together within it were also the key questions that medieval and Renaissance authors asked. Throughout this introductory course, we will study how canonical literary works from the 11th to the 16th century represented the conflicting debates of their times around these notions, from the Crusades to the Wars of Religion, from courtly love to Petrarchism, and from the figure of the Wandering Knight to the one of the Sea Farer. Were women inferior to men because their bodies were colder? What does a Christian superhero look like? Is Man at the center of God¿s creation? Are Catholics cannibals, or are Protestants heretics? Can the French language ever be as good as Ancient Greek? Are printed books dangerous? These are some questions that will be addressed in a multi-genre corpus, including works from Pisan, De France, Ronsard, Labé, Rabelais, and Montaigne. S more »
Gender, race and religion are at the heart of our contemporary political and societal debates. How to build a nation and how to live together within it were also the key questions that medieval and Renaissance authors asked. Throughout this introductory course, we will study how canonical literary works from the 11th to the 16th century represented the conflicting debates of their times around these notions, from the Crusades to the Wars of Religion, from courtly love to Petrarchism, and from the figure of the Wandering Knight to the one of the Sea Farer. Were women inferior to men because their bodies were colder? What does a Christian superhero look like? Is Man at the center of God¿s creation? Are Catholics cannibals, or are Protestants heretics? Can the French language ever be as good as Ancient Greek? Are printed books dangerous? These are some questions that will be addressed in a multi-genre corpus, including works from Pisan, De France, Ronsard, Labé, Rabelais, and Montaigne. Students will gain an acute sense of the main cultural, political, ideological and literary issues of this extended time period, while acquiring some historical perspective on the debates that are central to our 21st century societies. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

FRENCH 133: Literature and Society in Africa and the Caribbean (AFRICAAM 133, AFRICAST 132, COMPLIT 133A, COMPLIT 233A, CSRE 133E, JEWISHST 143)

This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the cultural, social, and political aspects at play in the literatures of Francophone Africa and the Caribbean of the 20th and 21st century. Our primary readings will be Francophone novels and poetry. We will also read some theoretical texts. The assigned readings will expose students to literature from diverse French-speaking regions of the African/Caribbean world. This course will also serve as a "literary toolbox," with the intention of facilitating an understanding of literary genres, and terms. Students can expect to work on their production of written and spoken French, in addition to reading comprehension. Special guest: Moroccan author Meryem Alaoui. Required readings include: Aime Cesaire, Maryse Condé, Fatou Diome, Dany Laferriere, Leonara Miano, Albert Memmi. Taught in French. Prerequisite: FRENLANG 124 or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Seck, F. (PI)

FRENCH 153: « Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité » : French Political Myths and Concepts (FRENCH 353)

"Liberté, égalité, fraternité," but also "laïcité," "diversité," "parité," "universalisme" : the French have forged over the last two centuries key political concepts that are articulated together in a unique way and shape the political consciousness, modes of engagements, aspirations and current debates of what has been called "the most political nation in the world." Along with mythologies such as the People, the Nation, the providential Leader, or the "enemy from within," they are at the centre of semantic and political battles, tugged over by the Left, the Right, populist movements, activists and counter-cultures. How did they emerge? How do they apply today? How does theory compare to practices, principles to day-to-day realities? An introduction through case-studies, films, paintings, cartoons, and texts from political theory, history, politics and literature. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

FRENCH 166: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 266, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course must email the professor (jrodin@stanford.edu) by 20 September with a statement of up to 350 words that includes: (a) reasons for wanting to take the class; (b) relevant background in cooking/medieval studies/etc.; (c) stated commitment to attend all ten course meetings; and (d) any dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Rodin, J. (PI)

FRENCH 199: Individual Work

Restricted to French majors with consent of department. Normally limited to 4-unit credit toward the major. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

FRENCH 266: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 366, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Rodin, J. (PI)

FRENCH 353: « Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité » : French Political Myths and Concepts (FRENCH 153)

"Liberté, égalité, fraternité," but also "laïcité," "diversité," "parité," "universalisme" : the French have forged over the last two centuries key political concepts that are articulated together in a unique way and shape the political consciousness, modes of engagements, aspirations and current debates of what has been called "the most political nation in the world." Along with mythologies such as the People, the Nation, the providential Leader, or the "enemy from within," they are at the centre of semantic and political battles, tugged over by the Left, the Right, populist movements, activists and counter-cultures. How did they emerge? How do they apply today? How does theory compare to practices, principles to day-to-day realities? An introduction through case-studies, films, paintings, cartoons, and texts from political theory, history, politics and literature. Taught in English.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5

FRENCH 366: Food, Text, Music: A Multidisciplinary Lab on the Art of Feasting (FRENCH 166, FRENCH 266, MUSIC 133, MUSIC 333)

Students cook a collection of unfamiliar recipes each week while learning about the cultural milieus in which they originated. The course focuses on the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, a time of great banquets that brought together chefs, visual artists, poets, musicians, and dancers. Students read late-medieval cookbooks under the guidance of professional chefs, learn songs and poetry with the help of visiting performers, and delve into a burgeoning scholarly literature on food history and sensory experience. We will also study trade routes and food networks, the environmental impact of large-scale banquets, the science of food, and the politics of plenty. This course may count towards the Medieval component of the French major, and corresponds to DLCL 121, a course requirement for the Medieval Studies Minor. Students interested in applying for course must email the professor (jrodin@stanford.edu) by 20 September with a statement of up to 350 words that includes: (a) reasons for wanting to take the class; (b) relevant background in cooking/medieval studies/etc.; (c) stated commitment to attend all ten course meetings; and (d) any dietary restrictions/preferences.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Rodin, J. (PI)
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