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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 17 results for: FINANCE ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FINANCE 201: Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

FINANCE 205: Accelerated Managerial Finance

This course covers the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications that are vital for corporate managers. We will discuss many of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers, both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be an important emphasis of the course. Topics include criteria for making investment decisions, valuation of financial assets and liabilities, relationships between risk and return, capital structure choice, payout policy, the use and valuation of derivative securities, and risk management. This course is targeted to those students who are new to finance and for those with little quantitative background.No previous background in finance is required or expected for this course. Content will be comparable to F201, but the majority of course lecture material will be delivered online, with in-class sessions devoted to applications of key concepts. This "flipped classroom" version of the course is intended for self-motivated students with an interest in applications. Prerequisite material for the course will be posted online in the fall.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Berk, J. (PI)

FINANCE 306: International Finance and Macroeconomics

An introduction to the global economy. We will cover a number of important topics for firms, banks, and policy makers: global capital flows, international financial markets, the role of the U.S. and US dollar in the international monetary system, reserve currencies history and future (stable coins?), exchange rates (floating, fixed, and monetary unions), financial crises, international financial policy (capital controls, bank regulation, FX intervention), currency wars, tax havens and global wealth dynamics, global trade, and trade wars. Emphasis will be on data driven approaches, no prior knowledge is assumed. An MBA class designed for those looking to understand today's global economic issues.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Maggiori, M. (PI)

FINANCE 319: Private Equity Investing Seminar

The Investments courses comprise an intensive overview of active fundamental investing in both the public and private equity markets. They are relevant for students who intend to pursue careers in private or public equity investing, as well as those who want to better understand investing from the perspective of an entrepreneur or individual. The vast majority of sessions will feature an outstanding investor guest lecturer. Previous guests included Andreas Halvorsen (Viking Global), Jim Coulter (TPG), Hadley Mullen (TSG Consumer Partners), Ryan Cotton (Bain Capital), Bill Oberndorf (SPO Partners) and Tim Bliss (Investment Group of Santa Barbara), and this year's lineup will be substantially similar. Established and taught for 50 years by the legendary Professor Jack McDonald, the Investments courses will be taught by John Hurley, founder of Cavalry Asset Management and Professor Steve Grenadier in Autumn 2019. Students are required to take F319 and F321 concurrently for 5 total units d more »
The Investments courses comprise an intensive overview of active fundamental investing in both the public and private equity markets. They are relevant for students who intend to pursue careers in private or public equity investing, as well as those who want to better understand investing from the perspective of an entrepreneur or individual. The vast majority of sessions will feature an outstanding investor guest lecturer. Previous guests included Andreas Halvorsen (Viking Global), Jim Coulter (TPG), Hadley Mullen (TSG Consumer Partners), Ryan Cotton (Bain Capital), Bill Oberndorf (SPO Partners) and Tim Bliss (Investment Group of Santa Barbara), and this year's lineup will be substantially similar. Established and taught for 50 years by the legendary Professor Jack McDonald, the Investments courses will be taught by John Hurley, founder of Cavalry Asset Management and Professor Steve Grenadier in Autumn 2019. Students are required to take F319 and F321 concurrently for 5 total units during the Autumn Quarter. F321 is a 2-unit compressed course that meets MWF from 2:30-5:30pm during Weeks 1 and 8 of the quarter. It addresses real-world applications of business analysis and valuation tools and teaches the skills necessary to evaluate investment opportunities. F319 is a 3-unit course that meets Tu/Th 12:40-2:00 PM throughout the quarter. Students delve into specific topics in private equity, venture capital, hedge funds, mutual funds and principal investing. Students can elect to take F319 graded or pass/fail. The Investments courses will make use of original case studies and teaching notes authored by the late Professor Jack McDonald and a team of course alumni from prior MBA classes. Case discussions and lecture discussions will be led by the teaching team and investors/principals who were involved. The Investments courses enable MBA students to learn a broad investing skillset and study the careers of outstanding investors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

FINANCE 321: Investment Management and Entrepreneurial Finance

The Investments courses comprise an intensive overview of active fundamental investing in both the public and private equity markets. They are relevant for students who intend to pursue careers in private or public equity investing, as well as those who want to better understand investing from the perspective of an entrepreneur or individual. The vast majority of sessions will feature an outstanding investor guest lecturer. Previous guests included Andreas Halvorsen (Viking Global), Jim Coulter (TPG), Hadley Mullen (TSG Consumer Partners), Ryan Cotton (Bain Capital), Bill Oberndorf (SPO Partners) and Tim Bliss (Investment Group of Santa Barbara), and this year's lineup will be substantially similar. Established and taught for 50 years by the legendary Professor Jack McDonald, the Investments courses will be taught by John Hurley, founder of Cavalry Asset Management and Professor Steve Grenadier in Autumn 2019. Students are required to take F319 and F321 concurrently for 5 total units d more »
The Investments courses comprise an intensive overview of active fundamental investing in both the public and private equity markets. They are relevant for students who intend to pursue careers in private or public equity investing, as well as those who want to better understand investing from the perspective of an entrepreneur or individual. The vast majority of sessions will feature an outstanding investor guest lecturer. Previous guests included Andreas Halvorsen (Viking Global), Jim Coulter (TPG), Hadley Mullen (TSG Consumer Partners), Ryan Cotton (Bain Capital), Bill Oberndorf (SPO Partners) and Tim Bliss (Investment Group of Santa Barbara), and this year's lineup will be substantially similar. Established and taught for 50 years by the legendary Professor Jack McDonald, the Investments courses will be taught by John Hurley, founder of Cavalry Asset Management and Professor Steve Grenadier in Autumn 2019. Students are required to take F319 and F321 concurrently for 5 total units during the Autumn Quarter. F321 is a 2-unit compressed course that meets MWF from 2:30-5:30pm during Weeks 1 and 8 of the quarter. It addresses real-world applications of business analysis and valuation tools and teaches the skills necessary to evaluate investment opportunities. F319 is a 3-unit course that meets Tu/Th 12:40-2:00 PM throughout the quarter. Students delve into specific topics in private equity, venture capital, hedge funds, mutual funds and principal investing. Students can elect to take F319 graded or pass/fail. The Investments courses will make use of original case studies and teaching notes authored by the late Professor Jack McDonald and a team of course alumni from prior MBA classes. Case discussions and lecture discussions will be led by the teaching team and investors/principals who were involved. The Investments courses enable MBA students to learn a broad investing skillset and study the careers of outstanding investors.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2

FINANCE 341: Modeling for Investment Management

This course will combine practical and up-to-date investment theory with modeling applications. Understanding beautiful theory, without the ability to apply it, is essentially useless. Conversely, creating state-of-the-art spreadsheets that apply incorrect theory is a waste of time. Here, we try to explicitly combine theory and application. The course will be divided into 6 modules, or topics. The first day of each module will be a lecture on an investment topic. Also provided is a team modeling project on the topic. The second day of each module will be a lab. The lab day will begin with modeling concepts (tips) designed to help you use Excel to implement the module's investment topic. After the tips are provided, the remainder of the lab day is devoted to teams working on their modeling project and allowing for Q&A. On the third day of each module will be presentations and wrap-up.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

FINANCE 347: Money and Banking

This course is designed to help students understand the connections between money (the Federal Reserve), financial markets, and the macroeconomy. How are interest rates determined, and how does the Federal Reserve conduct monetary policy? How do Federal Reserve actions impact the US as well as other economies? What economic factors drive the yield curves in different bond markets? We will pay particular attention to the banking system, with an eye toward understanding the function, valuation, and regulation of banks. We touch on a number of topics including the role of the Federal Reserve as a lender of last resort during financial crises, unconventional monetary policy tools such as quantitative easing and forward guidance, cryptocurrency, and emerging market financial crises. We will often begin class with a discussion of current macro-financial market events in the context of our course coverage.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

FINANCE 377: China's Financial System

This course is a survey of China's financial system, including its banking industry, monetary policy structure, and financial markets (bonds, derivatives, equities, foreign exchange, alternative asset management, and related markets). The goal is an integrated view of how capital, risk, and liquidity are intermediated within China and cross-border. Current trends (including liberalization of markets and financial stability) will be emphasized. Coverage will be through lectures, reading of research, including primary source documents and secondary (journalistic and analyst) commentary. There will be a range of subject-matter-expert speakers. Using our special video-technology enabled classrooms at Stanford and at the Stanford Center at PKU, this course is able to draw live speakers in Beijing and to meet jointly with students at Beijing University. Students will participate actively in class discussion, make a 5-minute (per student in each group) research presentation, and submit a 10-page term paper.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
Instructors: Duffie, D. (PI)

FINANCE 385: Angel and Venture Capital Financing for Entrepreneurs and Investors

This course covers all the stages of funding for early stage high-growth companies, from seed funding to venture capital rounds to a successful exit. We will concentrate on how entrepreneurs and investors make and should make important decisions. Examples of issues that we will cover are: How can entrepreneurs raise funding successfully? What are typical mistakes entrepreneurs make in raising capital and negotiating with investors? How to choose your investor? How to pitch to an investor? How do angels and VCs generate and process their deal flow and select companies? How are VCs involved in business decisions such as recruiting talent and replacing CEOs? What are the important provisions of financial contracts between VCs and founders? How to value early-stage companies? The course is very applied and mostly case-based. We will discuss a lot of nitty-gritty details that is a must for founders and investors. Case protagonists, founders, angels, and VCs will be among guest speakers. No prior knowledge of the VC industry is needed.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3

FINANCE 627: Venture Capital and Finance of Innovation

In this course we will study the theory and empirics of venture capital (VC) and, more broadly, finance of innovation. We will start by reviewing the way the VC and related markets function and then will dive into such topics as VC contracting, valuation, and impact on innovation. We will review most important research studies published in the field over the past 20+ years and pay particular attention to recent research.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3
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