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1 - 10 of 19 results for: FEMGEN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FEMGEN 21T: StoryCraft: Sexuality, Intimacy & Relationships (TAPS 21T)

What are the roles of sexuality, intimacy, and relationships in my life? How do I tell a compelling story? In this class, students will learn about these topics from the inside out. We will explore various perspectives on sexuality, intimacy, and relationships and then dive into our own stories to discover the richness and vibrancy of this part of our lives. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection. Students will be selected from this class to tell their stories in Beyond Sex Ed during NSO 2021. Please fill out this short application for enrollment: bit.ly/Spring2021StoryCraft.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Booth, B. (PI)

FEMGEN 99: Seeds of Change

This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students' technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience. In this three-quarter course (Fall, Winter, Spring), student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative's evaluation efforts. NOTE: Instructor Consent Required. Please email kpedersen@stanford.edu *Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. See syllabus for adjusted course schedule and times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

FEMGEN 105: Honors Work

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

FEMGEN 108: Internship in Feminist Studies

Supervised field, community, or lab experience in law offices, medical research and labs, social service agencies, legislative and other public offices, or local and national organizations that address issues related to gender and/or sexuality. One unit represents approximately three hours work per week. Required paper. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Majors may not receive 108 credit for their required practicum, as they are to sign up for FEMGEN 104 A & B instead. Prerequisites: Course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, written proposal and application form submitted for approval by program office, written consent of faculty sponsor. Course may be taken 3 times total, for a max of 15 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 15 units total)

FEMGEN 108A: Enacting Community Liberation: Women's Community Center

Campus internships are crucial forms of community-building that provide students hands-on experience with organizing, outreach, and community care. Moving from theory to praxis, the FGSS department in partnership with the Women's Community Center offers the ¿Enacting Community Liberation¿ internship.nnIn accordance with the mission of the WCC, this internship will focus on addressing issues of gender, identity, equity, and justice through a lens of intersectionality. The WCC strives to center the most marginalized, and create programming, projects, and services that serve said populations - understanding that when the needs of the most marginalized are met, everyone will be cared for.nnThis is a year-long internship, with the ability to receive one unit of course credit per quarter for up to 3 quarters of the academic year.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)

FEMGEN 128: Black Feminist and Trans Theories of the Hu/Man (AFRICAAM 129)

This course provides an introduction to Black feminist and trans theories¿ interventions into the modern Western category of the Hu/Man and its violent exclusions. Since their inception, Black and trans theories have brought attention to the violence of what Sylvia Wynter has called our ¿genres of the human,¿ and in so doing, have laid bear the very epistemological preoccupations that condemn the non-white, non-cisgender being to sub-Human status and death in the material and discursive economies of racial capitalism. Students will develop broad knowledge of Black feminist and trans theories¿ provocations regarding the intersecting identity categories that organize our world, and will be encouraged to develop their own critical approaches that are attentive to the hegemony of racialized gender and its attendant violences.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

FEMGEN 140D: LGBTQ History of the United States (FEMGEN 240D, HISTORY 257C)

An introductory course that explores LGBT/Queer social, cultural, and political history in the United States. By analyzing primary documents that range from personal accounts (private letters, autobiography, early LGBT magazines, and oral history interviews) to popular culture (postcards, art, political posters, lesbian pulp fiction, and film) to medical, military, and legal papers, students will understand how the categories of gender and sexuality have changed over the past 150 years. This class investigates the relationship among queer, straight and transgender identities. Seminar discussions will question how the intersections of race, class, gender, and sexuality influenced the construction of these categories.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-Gender, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Davies, A. (PI)

FEMGEN 143: One in Five: The Law, Politics, and Policy of Campus Sexual Assault (SOC 188)

TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past several years the issue of campus sexual assault and harassment has exploded into the public discourse. Multiple studies have reinforced the finding that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as approximately 10% of male students) experience sexual assault carried out through force or while the victim was incapacitated during their time in college. Fraternities have been found to be associated with an increased risk of female sexual assault on campus. Vulnerable students and those from marginalized groups are often found to be at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Sexual harassment rates are even higher. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most s more »
TRIGGER WARNING: Over the past several years the issue of campus sexual assault and harassment has exploded into the public discourse. Multiple studies have reinforced the finding that between 20-25% of college women (and a similar proportion of students identifying as transgender and gender-nonconforming, as well as approximately 10% of male students) experience sexual assault carried out through force or while the victim was incapacitated during their time in college. Fraternities have been found to be associated with an increased risk of female sexual assault on campus. Vulnerable students and those from marginalized groups are often found to be at increased risk. This is also a significant problem in k12 education. Sexual harassment rates are even higher. Survivors have come forward across the country with harrowing stories of assault followed by what they describe as an insensitive or indifferent response from college administrators. These survivors have launched one of the most successful, and surprising, social movements in recent memory. As a result, the federal government under President Obama stepped up its civil rights enforcement in this area, with over 300 colleges and universities under investigation for allegedly mishandling student sexual assault complaints as of the end of that administration. At the same time, the Obama administration's heightened response led to a series of high-profile lawsuits by accused students who assert that they were falsely accused or subjected to mishandled investigations that lacked sufficient due process protections. The one thing that survivors and accused students appear to agree on is that colleges are not handling these matters appropriately and appeared to be more concerned with protection the institutional brand than with stopping rape or protecting student rights. Colleges have meanwhile complained of being whipsawed between survivors, accused students, interest groups, and enforcement authorities. In an about-face that many found shocking, the Trump Administration rescinded all of the Obama-era guidance on the subject of sexual harassment and has promulgated new proposed regulations that would offer significantly greater protection to accused students and to institutions and commensurately less protection to survivors. An increasingly partisan Congress has been unable to pass legislation addressing the issue. It is unclear whether or to what extent the incoming Biden Administration will move to withdraw or amend the DeVos regulations. Meanwhile in schools have moved toward adopting an uneven patchwork of policies in which some schools cover conduct (for example, off campus conduct) that DeVos excluded from the purview of Title IX under the ambit of "supplemental" conduct policies and procedures setting up policy confusion and inequalities for students of different schools.This course focuses on the legal, policy, and political issues surrounding sexual assault and harassment on college campuses. Each week we will read, dissect, compare and critique a set of readings that include social science, history, literature, legal, policy, journalism, and narrative explorations of the topic of campus sexual assault. We will explore the history of gender-based violence and the efforts to implement legal protections for survivors in the educational context. We will also study the basic legal frameworks governing campus assault, focusing on the relevant federal laws such as Title IX and the Clery Act. We will critically explore the ways that responses to this violence have varied by the race, class, gender identity, sexual orientation, and other characteristics of parties and institutions. We will hear from guest speakers who are actively involved in shaping policy and advocating in this area, including lawyers, activists, journalists, and policymakers. This year we will also host special guest speaker Chanel Miller, author of the bestselling memoir Know My Name. The subject matter of this course is sensitive, and students are expected to treat the material with maturity. Much of the reading and subject matter may be upsetting and/or triggering for students who identify as survivors. There is no therapeutic component for this course, although supportive campus resources and Title IX staff are available for those who need them.Elements used in grading: Grades will be based on class attendance, class participation, and a research paper or project and class presentation Enrollment is by INSTRUCTOR PERMISSION. Access the consent form here https://www-cdn.law.stanford.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/20-21-Spr-LAW-7065-FEMGEN-143-SOC-188-One-in-Five-The-Law-Politics-and-Policy-of-Campus-Sexual-Assault-Michele-Landis-Dauber-Emma-Tsurkov-Consent-Form.docx or email etsurkov@stanford.edu to request a form via email. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until the class is full. Demand for the class is high and participation is capped at 18. The class usually fills quickly, so make sure to apply early. Cross-listed with the Law School ( LAW 7065 and with Sociology ( SOC 188).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Dauber, M. (PI)

FEMGEN 151: Feminist Life-Writing (LIFE 151)

This course explores life-writing as a form of feminist praxis. Feminist life-writing is an art form grounded in truth-telling, activism, and self-making that emerges from the long tradition of women writing private lives. Beginning with the politicized practices of second wave feminists up through contemporary trends in memoir and autofiction, we will confront an array of intersectional autobiographies that connect personal experience to broader movements, power structures, and oppressions. How has life-writing contributed to the articulation of feminist consciousness? How has feminism impacted the methods marginalized authors use to create forms for belonging and self-determination? As we think about the politics of life-writing, we will also consider feminist rhetorical and aesthetic strategies for confronting issues like trauma, disability, incarceration, motherhood, and friendship. Each student will conduct a large-scale research project focused on an author, genre, or theme of their choice. As we research the critical historical contexts for feminist memoir, we will simultaneously conduct our own creative experiments in life-writing.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 155: The Changing American Family (FEMGEN 255, SOC 155, SOC 255)

Family change from historical, social, demographic, and legal perspectives. Extramarital cohabitation, divorce, later marriage, interracial marriage, and same-sex cohabitation. The emergence of same-sex marriage as a political issue. Are recent changes in the American family really as dramatic as they seem? Theories about what causes family systems to change.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
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