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1 - 10 of 30 results for: FEMGEN ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

FEMGEN 7W: Service-Learning Workshop on Human Trafficking Part II (HISTORY 7W, HUMRTS 7W)

Prerequisite: HISTORY6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Continuation of HISTORY 6W ( FEMGEN 6W). Students will continue working on their projects with their community partners. Several class meetings and small group consultations throughout the quarter. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Jolluck, K. (PI)

FEMGEN 21T: StoryCraft: Sexuality, Intimacy & Relationships (TAPS 21T)

What are the roles of sexuality, intimacy, and relationships in my life? How do I tell a compelling story? In this class, students will learn about these topics from the inside out. We will explore various perspectives on sexuality, intimacy, and relationships and then dive into our own stories to discover the richness and vibrancy of this part of our lives. Due to the personal nature of the topic, we will emphasize safety, trust, and confidentiality throughout. The class offers the structure and guidance to 1) mine your life for stories, 2) craft the structure and shape of your stories, and 3) perform with presence, authenticity, and connection. Students will be selected from this class to tell their stories in Beyond Sex Ed Part 1 during NSO 2020. Please fill out this short application for enrollment: bit.ly/Spring2020StoryCraft. Class will be held in KINGSCOTE Gardens 140.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Booth, B. (PI)

FEMGEN 39: Long Live Our 4Bil. Year Old Mother: Black Feminist Praxis, Indigenous Resistance, Queer Possibility (AFRICAAM 39, CSRE 39, NATIVEAM 39)

How can art facilitate a culture that values women, mothers, transfolks, caregivers, girls? How can black, indigenous, and people of color frameworks help us reckon with oppressive systems that threaten safety and survival for marginalized people and the lands that sustain us? How can these questions reveal the brilliant and inventive forms of survival that precede and transcend harmful systems toward a world of possibility? Each week, this course will call on artists, scholars, and organizers of color who clarify the urgency and interconnection of issues from patriarchal violence to environmental degradation; criminalization to legacies of settler colonialism. These same thinkers will also speak to the imaginative, everyday knowledge and creative healing practices that our forebears have used for millennia to give vision and rise to true transformation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 90M: Queer Stories (ENGLISH 90M)

Like other 90 and 91-level courses, 90M will explore basic elements of fiction and nonfiction writing. Students will read a wide variety of stories and essays in order to develop a language for working through the themes, forms, and concerns of the queer prose canon. Students will complete and workshop a piece of writing that in some way draws upon the aesthetics or sensibilities of the work we have read, culled from exercises completed throughout the quarter. This final piece may be a short story, a personal essay, a chapter from a novel or memoir, or a piece that, in the spirit of queerness, blurs or interrogates standard demarcations of genre. The course is open to any and all students, regardless of how they define their gender or sexuality. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE, WAY-ED

FEMGEN 99: Seeds of Change

This course is a required training for student leaders of the Seeds of Change initiative. This initiative takes an interdisciplinary approach to STEM education, infusing students' technical training with leadership training through a lens of gender inequality - bringing together key components of feminist pedagogy, service-learning, and experiential education to create a transformational learning experience. In this three-quarter course (Fall, Winter, Spring), student leaders will: learn the core content featured in the Seeds of Change curriculum, reflect on their experiences as both learners and teachers of this content, hone their own leadership and group facilitation skills, and engage as researchers in the initiative's evaluation efforts. NOTE: Instructor Consent Required. Please email kpedersen@stanford.edu *Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center. See syllabus for adjusted course schedule and times.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

FEMGEN 105: Honors Work

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable for credit

FEMGEN 106Q: Gender and Media

From childhood, individuals are presented with texts and images about what it means to be female, what it means to be male, but rarely what it means to question that binary. These images and texts also present what it means to be in relationship with one another, and what it means to reject established gender roles. In this course, students will examine and research how lessons learned from popular culture impact the treatment and expectations of people individually as well as in relationship with each other. Specifically, we will analyze the ways in which news articles, movie clips, magazine advertisements, television commercials as well as other texts present gender identities as binary as well as gender roles of those binary structures. How are the roles and bodies of all genders presented as objects open to scrutiny, critique, exploitation, abuse, and awe? After examining rhetorical strategies and devices, we¿ll read excerpts from texts by social critics such as Susan Bordo who analyze culture and it¿s presentation of bodies. Through case studies of films and campaign ads, visits to spaces on campus that construct gender binaries, and field trips to off campus sites, we will explore how representations of gender challenge or reinforce messages in popular media.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2

FEMGEN 108: Internship in Feminist Studies

Supervised field, community, or lab experience in law offices, medical research and labs, social service agencies, legislative and other public offices, or local and national organizations that address issues related to gender and/or sexuality. One unit represents approximately three hours work per week. Required paper. May be repeated for credit. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Majors may not receive 108 credit for their required practicum, as they are to sign up for FEMGEN 104 A & B instead. Prerequisites: Course work in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, written proposal and application form submitted for approval by program office, written consent of faculty sponsor. Course may be taken 3 times total, for a max of 15 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

FEMGEN 127: Human in a Time of War (CSRE 127C)

It has often been said that the post-9/11 era has been one of never-ending war for the United States. Privatization and the increasing proliferation of ever more removed technologies of killing have raised questions regarding the disposability of racialized populations targeted for submission or containment. The global, ubiquitous nature of the U.S. military industrial complex has made war synonymous with impunity.nnHowever, racialized populations have arguably been under siege and positioned as disposable since the colonization of the Americas. This course draws upon Alexander Weheliye¿s (2014) challenge to move beyond the particular, querying how racialized, gendered experiences condition more expansive notions of the human. Following Jodi Kim¿s notion of the protracted afterlife of the Cold War as epistemological structure, this course traces the continuities and transformations in constructions of populations as more or less human, from settler colonial conquest to the post-9/11 er more »
It has often been said that the post-9/11 era has been one of never-ending war for the United States. Privatization and the increasing proliferation of ever more removed technologies of killing have raised questions regarding the disposability of racialized populations targeted for submission or containment. The global, ubiquitous nature of the U.S. military industrial complex has made war synonymous with impunity.nnHowever, racialized populations have arguably been under siege and positioned as disposable since the colonization of the Americas. This course draws upon Alexander Weheliye¿s (2014) challenge to move beyond the particular, querying how racialized, gendered experiences condition more expansive notions of the human. Following Jodi Kim¿s notion of the protracted afterlife of the Cold War as epistemological structure, this course traces the continuities and transformations in constructions of populations as more or less human, from settler colonial conquest to the post-9/11 era. How has racial and gendered violence functioned to determine not only which bodies matter but which lives are legible and which subjects granted the full range of human complexity? Recognizing the ¿layered interconnectedness of political violence, racialization, and the human,¿ this course also engages ¿the existence of alternative modes of life alongside the violence, subjection, exploitation, and racialization that define the modern human¿ (Weheliye, 1-2).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Chhun, L. (PI)
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