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1 - 10 of 35 results for: ESS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ESS 8: The Oceans: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (EARTHSYS 8)

The course will provide a basic understanding of how the ocean functions as a suite of interconnected ecosystems, both naturally and under the influence of human activities. Emphasis is on the interactions between the physical and chemical environment and the dominant organisms of each ecosystem. The types of ecosystems discussed include coral reefs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, coastal upwelling systems, blue-water oceans, estuaries, and near-shore dead zones. Lectures, multimedia presentations, group activities, and tide-pooling day trip.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

ESS 40: Approaching Palau: Preparation and Research Ideation and Development (CEE 40)

This class is a seminar designed to prepare students participating in the 2019 Palau Seminar for possible research activities. Enrollment by approval of the instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

ESS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (EARTHSYS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Francis, C. (PI)

ESS 102: Scientific Basis of Climate Change (ESS 202)

This course explores the scientific basis of anthropogenic climate change. We will read the original papers that established the scientific foundation for the climate change forecast. Starting with Fourier¿s description of the greenhouse effect, we trace the history of the key insights into how humanity is perturbing the climate system. The course is based on ¿The Warming Papers,¿ edited by David Archer and Raymond Pierrehumbert. Participants take turns presenting and leading a discussion of the papers and of Archer and Pierrehumbert¿s commentary.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5

ESS 106: World Food Economy (EARTHSYS 106, EARTHSYS 206, ECON 106, ECON 206, ESS 206)

The economics of food production, consumption, and trade. The micro- and macro- determinants of food supply and demand, including the interrelationship among food, income, population, and public-sector decision making. Emphasis on the role of agriculture in poverty alleviation, economic development, and environmental outcomes. Grades based on mid-term exam and group modeling project and presentation. Enrollment is by application only and will be capped at 25, with priority given to upper level undergraduates in Economics and Earth Systems and graduate students (graduate students enroll in 206). Application found at https://economics.stanford.edu/academics/undergraduate-program/forms
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI
Instructors: Naylor, R. (PI)

ESS 108: Research Preparation for Undergraduates

For undergraduates planning to conduct research during the summer with faculty through the MUIR and SUPER programs. Readings, oral presentations, proposal development. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Field, C. (PI)

ESS 115: Approaching Nepal: Coupled Human-Natural Systems of the Solokhumbu (ESS 215)

This class designed to prepare students participating in the 2020 BOSP Nepal Seminar. Through readings, lectures, and class discussions, students will acquire a working knowledge of coupled human-natural system theory and examine case studies of CHNS analysis in the region. We will also provide content on the history of Nepal and the Sherpa people, Buddhist and Hindu thoughts on nature and resources, agricultural systems across Himalayan ecotones, and geology, glaciology, water, and energy issues relevant to the course itinerary. The class will meet weekly through the Spring quarter. We may switch the time to accommodate the schedules of all enrolled students. The class is mandatory for students participating in BOSP Nepal 2020.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Dunbar, R. (PI)

ESS 135: Community Leadership

Offered through Residential Education to residents of Castano House, Manzanita Park. Topics include: emotional intelligence, leadership styles, listening, facilitating meetings, group dynamics and motivation, finding purpose, fostering resilience. Students will lead discussions on personal development, relationships, risky behaviors, race, ethnicity, spirituality, integrity.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Jones, J. (PI)

ESS 143: Molecular Geomicrobiology Laboratory (BIO 142, EARTHSYS 143, ESS 243)

In this course, students will be studying the biosynthesis of cyclic lipid biomarkers, molecules that are produced by modern microbes that can be preserved in rocks that are over a billion years old and which geologist use as molecular fossils. Students will be tasked with identifying potential biomarker lipid synthesis genes in environmental genomic databases, expressing those genes in a model bacterial expression system in the lab, and then analyzing the lipid products that are produced. The overall goal is for students to experience the scientific research process including generating hypotheses, testing these hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and communicating their results through a publication style paper. Prerequisites: BIO83 and CHEM35 or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Welander, P. (PI)

ESS 151: Biological Oceanography (EARTHSYS 151, EARTHSYS 251, ESS 251)

Required for Earth Systems students in the oceans track. Interdisciplinary look at how oceanic environments control the form and function of marine life. Topics include distributions of planktonic production and abundance, nutrient cycling, the role of ocean biology in the climate system, expected effects of climate changes on ocean biology. Local weekend field trips. Designed to be taken concurrently with Marine Chemistry (ESS/ EARTHSYS 152/252). Prerequisites: BIO 43 and ESS 8 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)
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