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1 - 10 of 28 results for: ENGR ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGR 14: Intro to Solid Mechanics

Introduction to engineering analysis using the principles of engineering solid mechanics. Builds on the math and physical reasoning concepts in Physics 41 to develop skills in evaluation of engineered systems across a variety of fields. Foundational ideas for more advanced solid mechanics courses such as ME80 or CEE101A. Interactive lecture sessions focused on mathematical application of key concepts, with weekly complementary lab session on testing and designing systems that embody these concepts. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval. Pre-requisite: Physics 41. For the first and last weeks of the quarter, the full class meets from 12:30-1:50pm PT on both Tuesday and Thursady. Weeks 2-9, the full class meets on Tuesdays (12:30-1:50), and byassigned discussion sections on Thursdays. When signing up for this course make sure to sign up both for the lecture and for a Discussion Section.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ENGR 15: Dynamics

Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ENGR 40M: An Intro to Making: What is EE

Is a hands-on class where students learn to make stuff. Through the process of building, you are introduced to the basic areas of EE. Students build a "useless box" and learn about circuits, feedback, and programming hardware, a light display for your desk and bike and learn about coding, transforms, and LEDs, a solar charger and an EKG machine and learn about power, noise, feedback, more circuits, and safety. And you get to keep the toys you build. Prerequisite: CS 106A.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

ENGR 90: Environmental Science and Technology (CEE 70)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR

ENGR 100: Teaching Public Speaking

The theory and practice of teaching public speaking and presentation development. Lectures/discussions on developing an instructional plan, using audiovisual equipment for instruction, devising tutoring techniques, and teaching delivery, organization, audience analysis, visual aids, and unique speaking situations. Weekly practice speaking. Students serve as apprentice speech tutors. Those completing course may become paid speech instructors in the Technical Communications Program. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 103: Public Speaking (ENGR 203)

Priority to Engineering students. Introduction to speaking activities, from impromptu talks to carefully rehearsed formal professional presentations. How to organize and write speeches, analyze audiences, create and use visual aids, combat nervousness, and deliver informative and persuasive speeches effectively. Weekly class practice, rehearsals in one-on-one tutorials, videotaped feedback. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Vassar, M. (PI)

ENGR 105: Feedback Control Design

Design of linear feedback control systems for command-following error, stability, and dynamic response specifications. Root-locus and frequency response design techniques. Examples from a variety of fields. Some use of computer aided design with MATLAB. Prerequisites: Dynamics systems ( EE 102B or ME 161), and ordinary differential equations ( CME 102 or Math 53). This course will include synchronous teaching sessions, but will be recorded to allow asynchronous participation
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci

ENGR 108: Introduction to Matrix Methods

Formerly EE 103/ CME 103. Introduction to applied linear algebra with emphasis on applications. Vectors, norm, and angle; linear independence and orthonormal sets; applications to document analysis. Clustering and the k-means algorithm. Matrices, left and right inverses, QR factorization. Least-squares and model fitting, regularization and cross-validation. Constrained and nonlinear least-squares. Applications include time-series prediction, tomography, optimal control, and portfolio optimization. Undergraduate students should enroll for 5 units, and graduate students should enroll for 3 units. Prerequisites: MATH 51 or CME 100, and basic knowledge of computing ( CS 106A is more than enough, and can be taken concurrently). ENGR 108 and Math 104 cover complementary topics in applied linear algebra. The focus of ENGR 108 is on a few linear algebra concepts, and many applications; the focus of Math 104 is on algorithms and concepts.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR, WAY-FR

ENGR 110: Perspectives in Assistive Technology (ENGR 110) (ENGR 210)

Online seminar and student project course that explores the personal, medical, social, ethical, and technical challenges surrounding the design, development, and use of technologies that improve the lives of people with disabilities and older adults. Guest lecturers include engineers, clinicians, researchers, and individuals with disabilities. Students from any discipline are welcome to enroll. Two credit units for students who pursue an individual assistive technology project (letter grade or S/NC) with a community partner. One credit unit for seminar attendance only (S/NC). See course website http://engr110.stanford.edu for more information. Designated a Cardinal Course by the Haas Center for Public Service.
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Jaffe, D. (PI)

ENGR 148: Principled Entrepreneurial Decisions (ENGR 248)

Examines how leaders tackle significant events that occur in high-growth entrepreneurial companies. Students prepare their minds for the difficult entrepreneurial situations that they will encounter in their lives in whatever their chosen career. Cases and guest speakers discuss not only the business rationale for the decisions taken but also how their principles affected those decisions. The teaching team brings its wealth of experience in both entrepreneurship and VC investing to the class. Previous entrepreneurship coursework or experience preferred. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: http://web.stanford.edu/class/engr248/apply.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Fuchs, J. (PI)
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