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1 - 10 of 77 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 1G: The Gothic: Transcultural, Multilingual, and Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Genre

Description: This course is a research platform for the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the Gothic literary and cinematic genres. We consider the Gothic to have rich traditions whose contributions to Queer and LGBTQ+ studies, cultural theory, political economy, bio-ethics, and techno-science, remain under-explored. By looking at the world from the peripheralized standpoints of the ¿monstrous,¿ the abject, the dark, the uncanny, and the tumultuous, the Gothic offers unique though often overlooked critical insights into modern societies. Students enrolled in this course will participate in research activities and reading discussions oriented towards crafting interdisciplinary Gothic syllabi for the future and a cross-cultural Encyclopedia of the Gothic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

ENGLISH 5C: WISE: Revelation and Apocalypse: Literature at the End of the World 1300-2000

Apocalyptic thinking never goes out of fashion, nor does literature that deals with the end times. This course explores two major categories of apocalyptic thinking-- largely defined by religious and medical discourses--and the connection between the two. From Revelation, the last book of the New Testament, to early modern reckonings inspired by fire and plague, to Romantic-era sci-fi by Mary Shelley, to Station Eleven, a 2014 novel which takes place after an apocalyptic flu pandemic, we will read both millenarians and millennials, considering different visions of the end of the world, and what may come after. We'll also ask, what are the stakes--what historical concerns and cultural obsessions are revealed, after all--in these varied prophetic imaginings?nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 5D: WISE: Bad Reading: Pleasure and Politics in Literary Value

As students of literature, we aspire to be good readers of the texts we encounter. But to see ourselves as good readers is implicitly(perhaps even complicitly)to set ourselves against another form of literary consumption: bad reading, and, by association, bad readers. Yet what makes reading "bad" or "good"? And who decides? The more we look, the less self-evident or definitive the distinction becomes,our footing precipitously dropping away into questions about our own reading practices and how society values them. The precarious label "bad reading" comes into even sharper relief when we consider that the term has long been associated not just with certain modes of reading, but also with certain classes of readers and certain kinds of books, from gory gothic thrillers and racy romances to sci-fi and comics. In this course, we will trace the definitions and stakes of bad reading from the nineteenth century to the present day, through sources ranging from Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf to more »
As students of literature, we aspire to be good readers of the texts we encounter. But to see ourselves as good readers is implicitly(perhaps even complicitly)to set ourselves against another form of literary consumption: bad reading, and, by association, bad readers. Yet what makes reading "bad" or "good"? And who decides? The more we look, the less self-evident or definitive the distinction becomes,our footing precipitously dropping away into questions about our own reading practices and how society values them. The precarious label "bad reading" comes into even sharper relief when we consider that the term has long been associated not just with certain modes of reading, but also with certain classes of readers and certain kinds of books, from gory gothic thrillers and racy romances to sci-fi and comics. In this course, we will trace the definitions and stakes of bad reading from the nineteenth century to the present day, through sources ranging from Jane Austen and Virginia Woolf to contemporary think-pieces on young adult literature and race in publishing. Along the way, we will aim both to discover whether bad reading is really so bad after all, and to understand how ideologies of gender, class, and race have shaped our conceptions of literary value.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Jordan, J. (PI)

ENGLISH 5E: WISE: The Novel of Love

How do love plots change over time? In this seminar, we will learn to think critically about idealized romantic fantasy as we explore the "novel of love" from its 18th century origins through the 20th century, and into the present, focusing on case study texts by Elizabeth Inchbald, E.M. Forster, and James Baldwin. We will begin by learning about the cultural and socioeconomic conditions associated with the rise of the novel in modern Europe. We will then think about how issues of class, race, gender, sexuality, and mobility transform representations of `love¿ across centuries and continents. Students will also be invited to apply their discoveries to contemporary love stories, including digital and audiovisual forms. Sociological and historical accounts will supplement the literary readings. Writing assignments are structured to build cumulatively towards the final paper, following collaborative rounds of revision and presentation. Developing critical self-awareness through engagement more »
How do love plots change over time? In this seminar, we will learn to think critically about idealized romantic fantasy as we explore the "novel of love" from its 18th century origins through the 20th century, and into the present, focusing on case study texts by Elizabeth Inchbald, E.M. Forster, and James Baldwin. We will begin by learning about the cultural and socioeconomic conditions associated with the rise of the novel in modern Europe. We will then think about how issues of class, race, gender, sexuality, and mobility transform representations of `love¿ across centuries and continents. Students will also be invited to apply their discoveries to contemporary love stories, including digital and audiovisual forms. Sociological and historical accounts will supplement the literary readings. Writing assignments are structured to build cumulatively towards the final paper, following collaborative rounds of revision and presentation. Developing critical self-awareness through engagement with various critical models, students will be encouraged to experiment with the traditional form of the academic essay.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Mavrody, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. NOTE: For undergraduates only. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CI: Inspired By Science: A Writing Workshop

How can your interest in science and the environment be enriched by a regular creative practice? How do you begin to write a poem or essay about the wonders of the natural world or the nuances of climate change? What are the tools and strategies available to creative writers, and how can these techniques be used to communicate complex concepts and research to wide-audiences? We begin to answer these questions by drawing inspiration from the rich tradition of scientists who write and writers who integrate science. Emphasizing writing process over finished product, students maintain journals throughout the quarter, responding to daily prompts that encourage both practice and play. Through open-ended and exploratory writing, along with specific exercises to learn the writer¿s craft students develop a sense of their own style and voice. Note: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CP: Poetry Off the Page

With recent blockbuster films like Patterson and major prizes being awarded to artists like Bob Dylan and Kendrick Lamar, the borders of what constitutes traditional literature are shifting. In this Creative Writing course we will be looking at literature `off the page,¿ in songwriting, spoken word, multi-media, and visual art. We will be workshopping our own creative projects and exploring the boundaries of contemporary literature. Artists we¿ll be looking at include Iron and Wine, Lil Wayne, Allen Ginsberg, Beyonce, David Lynch, Patti Smith, Mark Strand, Anne Carson, Danez Smith, Bon Iver, and Lou Reed.nNOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 10D: Introduction to English I: Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Early British Literature

How were gender and sexuality constructed and depicted a thousand years ago? How was illicit love depicted? How can women¿s silenced voices be heard? In this course, we¿ll examine British poetry, prose, and performance from c.600 to 1600 that challenge preconceptions about early people and culture, literary form and function. The readings will show how issues of voice, positionality, and identity are both fluid and surprising in the pre-modern era. We¿ll study texts written by and about women; texts that center transitional gender and non-binary sexualities; and texts that highlight the tension created by self and society, between being-in-the-world and conventional norms.nnAmong the works we¿ll study (in translation) are Old English and Welsh women¿s lyrics, saints¿ lives, guides for confined religious life, romance in French and Middle English, Chaucer¿s Canterbury Tales, sixteenth-century women¿s poetry and letters, and Renaissance drama.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Treharne, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 11A: Introduction to English II: From Milton to the Romantics

English majors must take class for 5 units. Major moments in English literary history, from John Milton's 'Paradise Lost' to John Keats's 'Hyperion'. The trajectory involves a variety of literary forms, including Augustan satire, the illuminated poetry of William Blake's handcrafted books, the historical novel invented by Sir Walter Scott, the society novel of Jane Austen, and William Wordsworth's epic of psychological and artistic development. Literary texts will be studied in the context of important cultural influences, among them civil war, religious dissent, revolution, commercialization, colonialism, and industrialization.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

ENGLISH 12A: Introduction to English III: Introduction to African American Literature (AFRICAAM 43, AMSTUD 12A)

In his bold study, What Was African American Literature?, Kenneth Warren defines African American literature as a late nineteenth- to mid-twentieth-century response to the nation's Jim Crow segregated order. But in the aftermath of the Jim Crow era and the Civil Rights movement, can critics still speak, coherently, of "African American literature"? And how does this political conception of African American literary production compare with accounts grounded in black language and culture? Taking up Warren's intervention, this course will explore African American literature from its earliest manifestations in the spirituals and slave narratives to texts composed at the height of desegregation and decolonization struggles at mid-century and beyond. English majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Elam, M. (PI)
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