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1 - 10 of 79 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 1D: Dickens Book Club

Through the academic year, we will read one Dickens novel, one number a week for 19 weeks, as the Victorians would have done as they read the serialized novel over the course of 19 months. The group gets together once a week for an hour and a half to discuss each number, to look carefully at the pattern that the author is weaving, to guess, as the Victorians would have done, what might be coming next, and to investigate the Victorian world Dickens presents. We look carefully at themes, characters, metaphorical patterns, and scenes that form Dickens' literary world, and spend increasing time evaluating the critique that Dickens levels at Victorian life. The weekly gatherings are casual; the discussion is lively and pointed.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)
Instructors: Paulson, L. (PI)

ENGLISH 1G: The Gothic: Transcultural, Multilingual, and Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Genre

Description: This course is a research platform for the interdisciplinary and cross-cultural study of the Gothic literary and cinematic genres. We consider the Gothic to have rich traditions whose contributions to Queer and LGBTQ+ studies, cultural theory, political economy, bio-ethics, and techno-science, remain under-explored. By looking at the world from the peripheralized standpoints of the ¿monstrous,¿ the abject, the dark, the uncanny, and the tumultuous, the Gothic offers unique though often overlooked critical insights into modern societies. Students enrolled in this course will participate in research activities and reading discussions oriented towards crafting interdisciplinary Gothic syllabi for the future and a cross-cultural Encyclopedia of the Gothic.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

ENGLISH 2: Reading for Justice: A collaboration (ENGLISH 300R)

The video-taped 8 minute and 46 second murder of George Floyd in May 2020, at the height of the Coronavirus pandemic shutdown in the U.S., lit a match on the tinderbox of racial injustice. The callousness with which the murder was carried out, the calm refusal of the policeman kneeling on Floyd's neck to heed the horrified objections of witnesses at the scene, and an in-the-bones familiarity for too many of us across the country regarding disproportionate police violence against people of color was finally too much to bear. Only the last in a long list of maiming and murders by state authorities of men, women, and children from racialized communities (African American, Latinx, and Native) across the country, Floyd's murder precipitated an anguished outcry for justice by feeling people of all races across the world. Floyd was not the first, and unfortunately, he is not the last, to be so abused. The difference now is that many more of us understand that we have to stand up and demand an more »
The video-taped 8 minute and 46 second murder of George Floyd in May 2020, at the height of the Coronavirus pandemic shutdown in the U.S., lit a match on the tinderbox of racial injustice. The callousness with which the murder was carried out, the calm refusal of the policeman kneeling on Floyd's neck to heed the horrified objections of witnesses at the scene, and an in-the-bones familiarity for too many of us across the country regarding disproportionate police violence against people of color was finally too much to bear. Only the last in a long list of maiming and murders by state authorities of men, women, and children from racialized communities (African American, Latinx, and Native) across the country, Floyd's murder precipitated an anguished outcry for justice by feeling people of all races across the world. Floyd was not the first, and unfortunately, he is not the last, to be so abused. The difference now is that many more of us understand that we have to stand up and demand an end to the injustice. nAmid calls to urgent action in support of racial and gender justice, this reading group/course considers literatures in English specifically through the lens of Reading and Teaching for Justice. The goal of this course is to train readers to attend to the perspectives of those whose lives are often denied, dismissed, disregarded, even as we attend to how and why works of literature that exclude such voices who hail from a variety of equity-seeking groups, both within and without the literary texts selected. Reading for Justice requests that as readers we engage deeply with what justice means for us today, and what it has meant historically.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1

ENGLISH 5F: WISE: Serial Children's Literature: Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

In this course we will look at Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events as a multi-genre block-busting phenomenon in its own right and as a case study in seriality and children's literature. Reading books 1-13 alongside research on literary markets and adolescent development we'll ask: How do we write about literature that exists simultaneously at the scale of a single novel and a series? What literary and socialpsychological theories help us make meaning of these texts? What audiences, and what needs within those audiences, did the series speak to in its cultural moment? What methods are appropriate for answering what questions? As we explore the world of best-sellers and book deals alongside questions of "appropriateness" and popularity we will engage various methodological angles, including literary critical, digital humanities, and sociological approaches. (No previous experience in sociology or digital humanities is required.) Final research projects may be produced on any more »
In this course we will look at Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events as a multi-genre block-busting phenomenon in its own right and as a case study in seriality and children's literature. Reading books 1-13 alongside research on literary markets and adolescent development we'll ask: How do we write about literature that exists simultaneously at the scale of a single novel and a series? What literary and socialpsychological theories help us make meaning of these texts? What audiences, and what needs within those audiences, did the series speak to in its cultural moment? What methods are appropriate for answering what questions? As we explore the world of best-sellers and book deals alongside questions of "appropriateness" and popularity we will engage various methodological angles, including literary critical, digital humanities, and sociological approaches. (No previous experience in sociology or digital humanities is required.) Final research projects may be produced on any text or texts related to course themes.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
Instructors: Nomura, N. (PI)

ENGLISH 5G: WISE: Blackness and the American Canon

The Black feminist novelist Toni Morrison once wrote that ¿it only seems that the canon of American literature is `naturally' or `inevitably' `white.' In fact it is studiously so. The impact of this revelation may feel alien to many students of literature today, for whom 'the canon' is little more than a euphemism for the 'Dead White Men' preserved in it, but for Morrison and the generation of intellectuals she belonged to, that recognition was the great cultural struggle of their era. This struggle, now remembered as the 'Canon Wars,' upset every convention of traditional literary scholarship, and set the terms for literary critical practice to this day. This course introduces students to key methods and stakes in 21st century literary research (to be practiced in their own development of a research project) through the Canon Wars and their legacies. Standing loosely in for `canon,' `war,' and `legacy,' we will read three novels together: Edgar Allan Poe's Narrative of Arthur Gordon P more »
The Black feminist novelist Toni Morrison once wrote that ¿it only seems that the canon of American literature is `naturally' or `inevitably' `white.' In fact it is studiously so. The impact of this revelation may feel alien to many students of literature today, for whom 'the canon' is little more than a euphemism for the 'Dead White Men' preserved in it, but for Morrison and the generation of intellectuals she belonged to, that recognition was the great cultural struggle of their era. This struggle, now remembered as the 'Canon Wars,' upset every convention of traditional literary scholarship, and set the terms for literary critical practice to this day. This course introduces students to key methods and stakes in 21st century literary research (to be practiced in their own development of a research project) through the Canon Wars and their legacies. Standing loosely in for `canon,' `war,' and `legacy,' we will read three novels together: Edgar Allan Poe's Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket, Toni Morrison's The Bluest Eye, and Mat Johnson's Pym. Through these novels, students will practice literary criticism and learn about its history, focusing on how the debates of the late 20th century created a framework for centering Blackness in the study of American culture, and cleared space for the emergent field of African American/Black Studies.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 5H: WISE: Dialogue in American Literature

What would literature be without conversations between characters? Dialogue is what brings fiction to life. In the words of literary critic Mikhail Bakhtin, 'the speaking person' is what 'makes a novel a novel.' In this course, we explore the crucial role dialogue plays in literature, treating every sentence of narrative fiction as a choice between characters, speech and some other mode of representation. We will pay close attention to both how fiction represents speaking persons and how dialogue interacts with the novel's other discourses. What can the dialogue scene as a formal unit tell us about narrative structure? How does dialogue shape plot? How does it animate character? Who gets to speak for themselves and which voices are passed over or suppressed? To explore these questions of form and politics, we'll read select works of fiction (by authors including Herman Melville, Zora Neale Hurston, and Margaret Millar) in conversation with major works of narrative theory.nNote: This Writing-Intensive Seminar in English (WISE) course fulfills WIM for English majors. Non-majors are welcome, space permitting. Enrollment is by permission (contact vbeebe@stanford.edu). For more information go to https://english.stanford.edu/writing-intensive-seminars-english-wise.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

ENGLISH 9CA: American Road Trip

From Whitman to Kerouac, Alec Soth to Georgia O'Keeffe, the lure of travel has inspired many American artists to pack up their bags and hit the open road. In this Creative Expressions course we will be exploring the art and literature of the great American road trip, including prose, poetry, films, and photography. We will be reading and writing in a variety of genres, workshopping our own stories, and considering the ways in which our personal journeys have come to inform and define our lives. The course includes a number of campus-wide field trips, and an end-of-quarter road trip down the California coast. NOTE: Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. NOTE: For undergraduates only. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CI: Inspired By Science: A Writing Workshop

How can your interest in science and the environment be enriched by a regular creative practice? How do you begin to write a poem or essay about the wonders of the natural world or the nuances of climate change? What are the tools and strategies available to creative writers, and how can these techniques be used to communicate complex concepts and research to wide-audiences? We begin to answer these questions by drawing inspiration from the rich tradition of scientists who write and writers who integrate science. Emphasizing writing process over finished product, students maintain journals throughout the quarter, responding to daily prompts that encourage both practice and play. Through open-ended and exploratory writing, along with specific exercises to learn the writer¿s craft students develop a sense of their own style and voice. Note: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9R: Humanities Research Intensive (CLASSICS 9R, EALC 9R, HISTORY 9R)

Everyone knows that scientists do research, but how do you do research in the humanities? This five-day course, taught over spring break, will introduce you to the excitement of humanities research, while preparing you to develop an independent summer project or to work as a research assistant for a Stanford professor. Through hands-on experience with archival materials in Special Collections and the East Asia Library, you will learn how to formulate a solid research question; how to gather the evidence that will help you to answer that question; how to write up research results; how to critique the research of your fellow students; how to deliver your results in a public setting; and how to write an effective grant proposal. Students who complete this course become Humanities Research Intensive Fellows and receive post-program mentorship during spring quarter, ongoing opportunities to engage with faculty and advanced undergraduates, and eligibility to apply for additional funding to support follow-up research. Freshmen and sophomores only. All majors and undeclared students welcome. No prior research experience necessary. Enrollment limited: apply by 11/2/20 at hri-fellows.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
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