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1 - 10 of 54 results for: ENGLISH ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ENGLISH 9CE: Creative Expression in Writing

Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. For undergrads only. NOTE: For undergraduates only. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 9CT: Special Topics in Creative Expression

Focus on a particular topic or process of creative expression. Primary focus on giving students a skill set to tap into their own creativity. Opportunities for students to explore their creative strengths, develop a vocabulary with which to discuss their own creativity, and experiment with the craft and adventure of their own writing. Students will come out of the course strengthened in their ability to identify and pursue their own creative interests. NOTE: First priority to undergrads. Students must attend the first class meeting to retain their roster spot. May repeat for credit.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 10C: Introduction to English I: Tradition and Individuality, Medieval to Early Modern

This course offers a comprehensive introduction to English literature from its beginning in the medieval period to the early seventeenth century. We will study individual literary voices and styles in the context of a growing national tradition. We will discuss major authors (such as Chaucer, More, Wyatt, Surrey, Sidney, Spenser, Jonson, Donne) and analyze representative literary works in a variety of genres, from the Old English elegy and Middle English lyrics to the Elizabethan sonnet, Renaissance comedy, and the allegorical epic. While the course equips students with specific analytical and interpretative tools necessary for a historical understanding of literature, it is equally committed to revealing the aesthetic interest that medieval and early modern literature still holds for the modern reader.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Lupic, I. (PI)

ENGLISH 12C: Introduction to English III: Modern Literature

Survey of the major trends in literary history from 1850 to the present.
Terms: Aut | Units: 5
Instructors: Kantor, R. (PI)

ENGLISH 18Q: Writer's Salon

This course explores from a writer's perspective what it takes to craft a successful novel, short story collection, or book of poetry. You will read three prize-winning books from Bay Area authors, including Creative Writing instructors here at Stanford. Each author will visit our class to talk about their work and the writing process. From week to week, you will complete short writing exercises culminating in a longer story or series of poems that you share with class. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Ekiss, K. (PI)

ENGLISH 19Q: I Bet You Think You're Funny: Humor Writing Workshop

Nothing is harder than being funny on purpose. We often associate humor with lightness, and sometimes that's appropriate, but humor is inextricably interlinked with pain and anger, and our funniest moments often spring from our deepest wounds. Humor can also allow us a platform for rage and indignation when other forms of rhetoric feel inadequate. This workshop will take students through the techniques and aesthetics of humor writing, in a variety of forms, and the main product of the quarter will be to submit for workshop a sustained piece of humor writing. For undergrads only.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE
Instructors: Porter, E. (PI)

ENGLISH 21Q: Write Like a Poet: From Tradition to Innovation

In this poetry workshop, we will spend the first half of the quarter reading and writing in traditional forms and the second half innovating from those forms. When discussing poetry, what do we mean when we talk about craft? What is prosody and why is it important? What are the relationships between form and content? What does a modern sonnet look like? We will consider how a writer might honor a tradition without being confined by it. The culmination of the course will be a project in which the student invents (and writes in) a form of their own. All interested students are welcome¿beginners and experts alike.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ENGLISH 40N: Theatrical Wonders from Shakespeare to Mozart

What is the secret of theatrical illusion? How does the theater move us to wonder, sympathetic identification, and reflection? How can the theater help society understand and manage social conflict and historical change? We will ask these questions through a close examination--on the page and on the stage--of dramatic masterpieces by Shakespeare and Mozart. We will attend live performances of Gounod¿s opera Romeo and Juliet and of Mozart¿s opera The Marriage of Figaro. No prior knowledge of music or foreign languages is required; neither is prior experience in theatricals.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Hoxby, B. (PI)

ENGLISH 50: HUMANITIES HOUSE WORKSHOP

For student-run workshops and research seminars in Ng House / Humanities House. Open to both residents and non-residents. May be repeated for credit. This course code covers several discrete workshops each quarter; sign up for a particular workshop via the Google Form at https://goo.gl/forms/TRU0AogJP3IHyUmr2.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

ENGLISH 87N: The Conscience

What kind of science, or knowledge, does the con-science impart? How does this knowledge relate to what one nineteenth-century thinker called the ¿intellectual conscience¿? The indeterminacy of conscience¿s claims makes it a subject that all but demands close reading, and it is a matter of historical fact that ethical reasoning has often taken place within and through literary forms. This course thus takes the scientific efflorescence of the early modern period (c. 1500-1800) as its historical center of gravity, but focuses above all on the development of interpretive habits. Proceeding through texts long associated with crises of conscience (selections may include Genesis, Macbeth, Moll Flanders), we will consider how the creative force of interpretation bears on evolving conceptions of ethical inquiry and intellectual obligation.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
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