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1 - 10 of 36 results for: ENERGY

ENERGY 20N: Technology in the Greenhouse

The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like e more »
The evidence that human activities are changing the climate is overwhelming. Energy use is woven throughout the fabric of modern societies, and energy systems are also a primary way that humans interact with the global Earth systems like climate. We know enough about the potential impacts of climate change to see that we need to transform the world¿s energy systems to a much cleaner set of technologies with much lower greenhouse gas emissions. Economies that use energy in a clean, cost-effective way will be much more competitive in the future. The clean energy transition is now underway, with reductions in coal use and rapid growth in solar and wind deployment, but there is much more to do to limit the adverse impacts of climate change. This seminar explores technology options available to make the changes needed, in the developed and developing worlds. There is no shortage of energy available for our use. Instead, the challenge is to convert those energy resources into services like electricity and transportation, and that conversion requires technology, as well as policies and markets that enable innovation. The scale of the world¿s energy systems is dauntingly large, and we will need a well-diversified set of options to meet the challenge. Wind, solar, nuclear, carbon capture and storage for fossil fuel use, modified agriculture, electric (and automated) vehicles, advanced air conditioning, and many other technology options exist. We will consider these technologies and ask what barriers will have to be addressed if they are to be deployed at a scale large enough to reduce the impact climate change. The format will be discussions of technologies and their potential with a project and student presentations toward the end of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 101A: Energizing California

A weekend field trip featuring renewable and nonrenewable energy installations in Northern California. Tour geothermal, bioenergy, and natural gas field sites with expert guides from the Department of Energy Resources Engineering. Requirements: One campus meeting and weekend field trip. Enrollment limited to 25. Freshman have first choice.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (EARTHSYS 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 104: Sustainable Energy for 9 Billion

This course explores the transition to a sustainable energy system at large scales (national and global), and over long time periods (decades). Explores the drivers of global energy demand and the fundamentals of technologies that can meet this demand sustainably. Focuses on constraints affecting large-scale deployment of technologies, as well as inertial factors affecting this transition. Problems will involve modeling global energy demand, deployment rates for sustainable technologies, technological learning and economics of technical change. Recommended: ENERGY 101, 102.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ENERGY 155: Undergraduate Report on Energy Industry Training

On-the-job practical training under the guidance of on-site supervisors. Required report detailing work activities, problems, assignments and key results. Prerequisite: written consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 175: Well Test Analysis

Lectures, problems. Application of solutions of unsteady flow in porous media to transient pressure analysis of oil, gas, water, and geothermal wells. Pressure buildup analysis and drawdown. Design of well tests. Computer-aided interpretation.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 192: Undergraduate Teaching Experience

Leading field trips, preparing lecture notes, quizzes under supervision of the instructor. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 193: Undergraduate Research Problems

Original and guided research problems with comprehensive report. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

ENERGY 194: Special Topics in Energy and Mineral Fluids

May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-3 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

ENERGY 195: Electrochemical Energy Storage Systems: Modeling and Estimation (ENERGY 295)

The course focuses on modeling and estimation methods as necessary tools to extract the full potential from Lithium-ion batteries, specifically used in electrified vehicles. The complex nature of a battery system requires that a physics-based approach, in the form of electrochemical models, be used as a modeling platform to develop system-level control algorithms to allow designer to maximize batteries performance and longevity while guaranteeing safety operations. In this course, we will cover 1) first-principles methods to model battery dynamics, 2) electrochemical and control-oriented models, 3) parameter identification problems, 4) estimation algorithms for real-time application. A formal exposure to state space analysis and estimation of dynamical systems will be given. Previously ENERGY 294. Prerequisites: Equivalent coursework in linear systems and control.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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