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Due to recent announcements about Autumn Quarter (see the President's update), please expect ongoing changes to the class schedule.

1 - 10 of 35 results for: EMED ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EMED 101: Emergency Management Skills: Stanford Response Team Training

Addresses personal, community, and organizational response and resilience in emergencies. Learn disaster psychology and self care, personal risk assessment, situational awareness, and preparedness. Obtain the skills needed to deploy as a layperson member of a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT). Learn and practice first aid, light rescue, medical field operations, and experience team building exercises tailored to disaster response. Analyze emergency management concepts and approaches to learn about Stanford's response to a range of scenarios/case studies within the framework of country, state, and federal public health responses. Leave the course prepared to assist in emergency situations meaningfully and confidently.
Terms: Win | Units: 1

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support & First Aid

Provides fundamental knowledge and skills in managing illness and injury in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. Includes rescuer safety, recognition of emergency, general principles in care, medical and injury emergencies, CPR and AED for adult, child, infant. For those with general interest for community response or who have a duty to respond because of job responsibilities. Open to all. MD students take EMED 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 2 units total)
Instructors: Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 111A: EMED 111A: Emergency Medical Responder Training (EMED 211A)

The Stanford Emergency Medical Responder (EMR) Program ( EMED 111A) gives an introduction to those interested in EMS, and provides an overview of the knowledge and skills necessary to manage the scene of an emergency until more highly trained responders arrive.nnnThis theoretical and practical training is a prerequisite and will prepare you for the EMT Program in Winter and Spring quarters ( EMED 111B/C). It also allows students to sit for the NREMT exam for First Responders/EMRs once the optional skills session has been successfully completed.nnnThe EMR Skills Session will be hosted for 20 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. nnn***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.***
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 3-5

EMED 111B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211B)

First of two-quarter Stanford Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program ( EMED 111B/C). Students are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission).The EMT Skills Session will be hosted for 24 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. Optional Friday lab before the EMT Skills Session. ***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the c more »
First of two-quarter Stanford Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) Program ( EMED 111B/C). Students are trained to provide basic life support and to transport sick and injured patients to the hospital. Topics include patient assessment and management of cardiac, respiratory, neurological and other medical emergencies. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. After completion of the EMED 111 sequence and meeting all class requirements, students can sit for the National Registry EMT cognitive exam and obtain state certification as an EMT. We encourage freshman and sophomores to apply. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission).The EMT Skills Session will be hosted for 24 hours over a weekend during the quarter. The exact date will be announced during Week 1 of the course. Optional Friday lab before the EMT Skills Session. ***For those not present on campus, the Skills Session can be completed any quarter up to one year following completion of the class.*** Prerequisites: EMED 111A and application (see http://emt.stanford.edu), or consent of instructor. AHA or Red Cross healthcare provider CPR certification is also required, but can be obtained during the quarter. A one-time course fee of $100 will be assessed to cover required equipment and a uniform shirt. (Financial assistance may be available. Please contact instructor with any concerns.)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EMED 112B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212B)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, Stanford's EMT training course.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 115: Writing Narrative Medicine (EMED 215)

This course details and models the methods required for the practice of narrative medicine. Students will examine a variety of works, including poetry, short stories, memoirs, and other illness narratives. They will engage in reflective writing exercises that will allow them to draw on the reading material and practice elements of craft that relate to the text. Through this approach, they will build their close reading and reflective writing skills, while analyzing central themes in narrative medicine, including loss, identity, and the construction of personal history.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 4 times (up to 12 units total)
Instructors: Merritt, A. (PI)

EMED 122: BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience (BIOE 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promi more »
Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promising technologies for pandemic response and resilience, and other relevant topics. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, public health leaders, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. Additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 123N: Does Social Media Make Better Physicians?

Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or po more »
Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or pod casting, though such experiences or skills are not prerequisites for enrollment. Throughout the seminar, there will be an emphasis on the impact of digital scholarship. Students will have the opportunity to submit high-quality classwork for possible online publication on several medical education sites made available by the course instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Gisondi, M. (PI)

EMED 124: Wilderness First Aid

Provides basic introductory back country and emergency medicine skill development. Topics covered include patient assessment, addressing life threats, shock, spine safety, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, and environmental emergencies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 125: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

The Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) program is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine. Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Wang, N. (PI)
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