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1 - 10 of 36 results for: EMED ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EMED 5C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 5C, FEMGEN 5C, HISTORY 5C, INTNLREL 5C)

(Same as History 105C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EMED 105C: Human Trafficking: Historical, Legal, and Medical Perspectives (CSRE 105C, FEMGEN 105C, HISTORY 105C, HUMRTS 112, INTNLREL 105C)

(Same as HISTORY 5C. History majors and others taking 5 units, enroll in 105C.) Interdisciplinary approach to understanding the extent and complexity of the global phenomenon of human trafficking, especially for forced prostitution, labor exploitation, and organ trade, focusing on human rights violations and remedies. Provides a historical context for the development and spread of human trafficking. Analyzes the current international and domestic legal and policy frameworks to combat trafficking and evaluates their practical implementation. Examines the medical, psychological, and public health issues involved. Uses problem-based learning. Students interested in service learning should consult with the instructor and will enroll in an additional course.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: WAY-SI

EMED 110: Basic Cardiac Life Support & First Aid

Provides fundamental knowledge and skills in managing illness and injury in the first few minutes until professional help arrives. Includes rescuer safety, recognition of emergency, general principles in care, medical and injury emergencies, CPR and AED for adult, child, infant. For those with general interest for community response or who have a duty to respond because of job responsibilities. Open to all. MD students take EMED 201.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 111B: Emergency Medical Technician Training (EMED 211B)

Continuation of EMED 111A/211A. Topics include ambulance operations, environmental emergencies, and management of trauma including falls, gunshot wounds, orthopedic and blast injuries. Includes both lecture and practical sessions. (ONLY graduate students may enroll for 3 or 4 units with instructor permission, see EMED 211B.) nPrerequisites: EMED 111A/211A and consent of instructor, AHA or RC CPR certification.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EMED 112B: Advanced Training and Teaching for the EMT (EMED 212B)

Advanced topics and teaching in EMS, including assessment and treatment of the undifferentiated trauma patient (including airway management, monitoring, and evaluation) and prehospital care in nontraditional locations. Students taking this course also serve as teaching assistants for EMED 111/211, Stanford's EMT training course.n**THIS IS NOT AN EMT REFRESHER COURSE, only EMED 112A/212A is a California and NREMT approved EMT refresher course.**nPrerequisites: Current EMT certification (state or NREMT), CPR for Healthcare Providers, and consent of instructor. See http://emt.stanford.edu for more details.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-3 | Repeatable for credit

EMED 114SI: On the Path to Medical School

This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school, with an opt-in component to work alongside doctors in the Emergency Room at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover whether the pre-medical path is right for them and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In addition, in collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course is a one-stop shop for getting all the information needed to become an efficient, successful pre-medical student while also g more »
This is a course for all prospective pre-medical students, including undergraduate and graduate students, who seek knowledge and guidance on their path to medical school, with an opt-in component to work alongside doctors in the Emergency Room at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Discussions, presentations, and lectures will help students discover whether the pre-medical path is right for them and if so, how best to navigate the pre-med requirements. In addition, in collaboration with physician advisors and medical students, we have designed a series of presentations on topics including strategically approaching pre-medical classes and extracurriculars, studying for the MCAT, optimizing the medical school application, preparing for medical school interviews, and evidence-based pros and cons of careers in medicine and differences between specialties. This course is a one-stop shop for getting all the information needed to become an efficient, successful pre-medical student while also gaining clinical experience as students consider whether medicine is right for them and navigate the path to medical school. Currently, to our knowledge, there are no classes directly targeted towards guiding students at every stage of the premed path in this way while also providing an active volunteer learning experience, and yet pre-meds are among the largest group of pre-professional students at Stanford. Participants can also apply to volunteer in the emergency department at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center. Students participating in the clinical component can simultaneously improve hospital workflow and learn from partnering with Emergency Department physicians, gaining more hands-on exposure in order to inform premedical career path decision making.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Weiss, E. (PI)

EMED 122: Biosecurity and Bioterrorism Response (BIOE 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. How well the US and global healthcare systems are prepared to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and the technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism response and how they interface, the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats, global bio-surveillance, making the medical diagnosis, isolation, containment, hospital surge capacity, stockpiling and distribution of countermeasures, food and agriculture biosecurity, new promising technologies for detection of bio-threats and countermeasures. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. 4 units for twice weekly attendance (Mon. and Wed.); additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

EMED 123N: Does Social Media Make Better Physicians?

Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or po more »
Scientific knowledge doubles every 90 days. Physicians must quickly learn about recent discoveries to remain current in their chosen specialties. How does tech help doctors stay up-to-date? Twitter, Snapchat, lnstagram, and Face book are used to teach physicians and their patients. Online learning systems have replaced most textbooks and social media platforms are now vehicles to disseminate new knowledge. This seminar will explore the best ways to use technology in medical education, with a focus on the application of social media as a key instructional tool. Students will learn about the different stages of education required to become a physician and explore some of the challenges to continuing medical education. Class assignments will include the creation of health education infographics, reading and drafting posts for medical biogs, and critical analysis of medical podcasts. The course will be particularly interesting to pre-medical students who have a background in blogging or pod casting, though such experiences or skills are not prerequisites for enrollment. Throughout the seminar, there will be an emphasis on the impact of digital scholarship. Students will have the opportunity to submit high-quality classwork for possible online publication on several medical education sites made available by the course instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Gisondi, M. (PI)

EMED 124: Wilderness First Aid

Provides basic introductory back country and emergency medicine skill development. Topics covered include patient assessment, addressing life threats, shock, spine safety, musculoskeletal injuries, medical emergencies, and environmental emergencies.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Thompson, A. (PI)

EMED 125: Social Emergency Medicine and Community Engagement

The Stanford Health Advocates and Research in the Emergency Department (SHAR(ED)) program is focused on the practical application of and research in social emergency medicine. Emergency Departments (EDs) are the nation's safety nets for medical as well as social needs. EDs remain the sole access to any medical care for those in need, 24/7, regardless of insurance status. The ED is a unique bridge to the public and is a compelling site for community partnership, clinical and health services research geared towards impacting population health and policy. Through direct patient contact and community engagement, students help to meet the social needs of ED patients. (Cardinal Course certified by the Haas Center)
Terms: Win | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Wang, N. (PI)
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