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1 - 10 of 11 results for: EASTASN ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EASTASN 77: Divided Memories & Reconciliation: the formation of wartime historical memory in the Pacific (EASTASN 277)

Divided Memories will examine the formation of historical memory about World War Two in Asia, looking comparatively at the national memories of China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. It will also study efforts at reconciliation in contemporary Asia. The course will look at the role of textbooks, popular culture, with an emphasis on cinema, and elite opinion on the formation of wartime memory. We will study and discuss controversial issues such as war crimes, forced labor, sexual servitude, and the use of atomic weapons. Class will combine lectures with in class discussion, with short essays or papers.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Sneider, D. (PI)

EASTASN 97: The International Relations of Asia since World War II (EASTASN 297)

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 117: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 217)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EASTASN 179: Rebalancing Economic Systems in a World Driven by Tech: Quality-of-Life in Socio-Cultural Context (EASTASN 279)

This course examines the broader consequences of economic models that rely on innovation-driven growth, e.g. increases in social inequality, tension between globalism and isolationism, and tendencies toward authoritarianism. After an overview of the historical outcomes of previous industrial revolutions, we examine how the above trends are exacerbated in the era of digital transformation, comparing different economic systems (e.g. China, India, Japan, and the U.S.) as realized in their socio-political and cultural contexts. We then discuss approaches toward rebalancing existing systems, including metrics for evaluating economic performance and its impact, in order to satisfy the imperatives of social, environmental, and economic sustainability.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EASTASN 217: Health and Healthcare Systems in East Asia (EASTASN 117)

China, Japan, and both Koreas. Healthcare economics as applied to East Asian health policy, including economic development, population aging, infectious disease outbreaks (SARS, avian flu), social health insurance, health service delivery, payment incentives, competition, workforce policy, pharmaceutical industry, and regulation. No prior knowledge of economics or healthcare required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5

EASTASN 277: Divided Memories & Reconciliation: the formation of wartime historical memory in the Pacific (EASTASN 77)

Divided Memories will examine the formation of historical memory about World War Two in Asia, looking comparatively at the national memories of China, Japan, Korea, and the United States. It will also study efforts at reconciliation in contemporary Asia. The course will look at the role of textbooks, popular culture, with an emphasis on cinema, and elite opinion on the formation of wartime memory. We will study and discuss controversial issues such as war crimes, forced labor, sexual servitude, and the use of atomic weapons. Class will combine lectures with in class discussion, with short essays or papers.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Sneider, D. (PI)

EASTASN 279: Rebalancing Economic Systems in a World Driven by Tech: Quality-of-Life in Socio-Cultural Context (EASTASN 179)

This course examines the broader consequences of economic models that rely on innovation-driven growth, e.g. increases in social inequality, tension between globalism and isolationism, and tendencies toward authoritarianism. After an overview of the historical outcomes of previous industrial revolutions, we examine how the above trends are exacerbated in the era of digital transformation, comparing different economic systems (e.g. China, India, Japan, and the U.S.) as realized in their socio-political and cultural contexts. We then discuss approaches toward rebalancing existing systems, including metrics for evaluating economic performance and its impact, in order to satisfy the imperatives of social, environmental, and economic sustainability.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Dasher, R. (PI)

EASTASN 297: The International Relations of Asia since World War II (EASTASN 97)

Asian international relations since World War II were dominated by the efforts of the newly independent nation-states of Asia, almost all of which had been colonies before the war, to establish and maintain sovereignty in a context of American and Soviet competition for influence in the region. This course traces the major developments of the period, including the Chinese civil war, the U.S. occupation of Japan, the division of Korea and the Korean War, the South and Southeast Asian independence struggles, the American and Soviet alliance systems, the Vietnam War, the strategic realignments that led to the end of the Cold War in Asia, the emergence of Central Asia, and the legacy of issues that the period has posed for the region today.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Miller, A. (PI)

EASTASN 300: Graduate Directed Reading

Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. For East Asian Studies M.A. students only.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 5 units total)

EASTASN 390: Practicum Internship

On-the-job training under the guidance of experienced, on-site supervisors. Meets the requirements for curricular practical training for students on F-1 visas. Students submit a concise report detailing work activities, problems worked on, and key results. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: qualified offer of employment and consent of adviser.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1 | Repeatable 3 times (up to 3 units total)
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