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1 - 10 of 41 results for: EARTHSYS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EARTHSYS 8: The Oceans: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (ESS 8)

The course will provide a basic understanding of how the ocean functions as a suite of interconnected ecosystems, both naturally and under the influence of human activities. Emphasis is on the interactions between the physical and chemical environment and the dominant organisms of each ecosystem. The types of ecosystems discussed include coral reefs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, coastal upwelling systems, blue-water oceans, estuaries, and near-shore dead zones. Lectures, multimedia presentations, group activities, and tide-pooling day trip.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Arrigo, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 11: Introduction to Geology (GEOLSCI 1)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Sperling, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 26: Sustainability in Athletics

This interactive, seminar-style course explores the intersection of environmental sustainability and athletics. Athletic teams and organizations provide a unique lens to analyze environmental sustainability due to their global reach, enormous fan bases and widely recognized sport icons. At the same time, the athletics industry produces an enormous environmental footprint with its travel, gear, competitive fueling, events, venue construction and maintenance. Because of this position, the sports industry has the opportunity and responsibility to create meaningful change in support of a sustainable future. We will explore the many ways that the athletics industry can make this change by inviting weekly speakers from a multitude of sports realms to share their expertise, vision and advice. There will be six learning modules addressing sustainability in terms of athletic gear and equipment, sports nutrition, facilities and stadiums, game days and events, the national and international stage, and individual sustainability superstars. Through taking this course, students will develop an understanding for the current state of athletic sustainability as well as future directions for the industry in this space.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EARTHSYS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (ESS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Francis, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 55Q: Am I a Part of Earth? Understanding of Rock, Water, and Time

Am I a part of Earth? Not only is this a question of personal meaning, but also a complex question that shapes how we interact with the natural world. Answering it calls for both scientific and experiential understanding of Earth processes, as well as how geologic thinking and our individual thinking about nature have changed through time. By connecting Earth processes and rates of transformations to personal experience, we can rigorously interrogate our relationship to and/or separation from Earth.nnIn this course, you will think like a philosopher and a geochemist. You will commune with nature and calculate the history of rocks. You will use real data analysis of Earth processes to understand the limits of our knowledge about Earth history (Deep Time). You will explore your interactions with Earth materials through mindfulness activities and discuss different views of humans relative to nature through history. You will have autonomy in a course-long project that synthesizes your grow more »
Am I a part of Earth? Not only is this a question of personal meaning, but also a complex question that shapes how we interact with the natural world. Answering it calls for both scientific and experiential understanding of Earth processes, as well as how geologic thinking and our individual thinking about nature have changed through time. By connecting Earth processes and rates of transformations to personal experience, we can rigorously interrogate our relationship to and/or separation from Earth.nnIn this course, you will think like a philosopher and a geochemist. You will commune with nature and calculate the history of rocks. You will use real data analysis of Earth processes to understand the limits of our knowledge about Earth history (Deep Time). You will explore your interactions with Earth materials through mindfulness activities and discuss different views of humans relative to nature through history. You will have autonomy in a course-long project that synthesizes your growing understanding of your relationship to and/or separation from Earth.nnThis course welcomes all, from rock collectors to hikers and ecofeminists to meditators. No prior experience with philosophy or Earth science is required, though an introductory high school chemistry and algebra course will be helpful. The only requirement is a willingness to examine your personal relationship with Earth from scientific and humanistic perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Nelson, J. (PI)

EARTHSYS 96: Land Justice: Unearthing Histories & Seeding Liberation

Through readings, class discussions, direct interviews, peer reviews, and blog posts, this course grounds students in United States land histories, explores contemporary efforts towards food and land justice, and equips students with the frameworks to envision and work towards an equitable and just food and land management system, and greater environmental movement. Teams of students will have the opportunity to delve deeper into course concepts through direct engagement with our community partners. This course acknowledges the ways that historical and contemporary colonial violence, racism, and systemic injustice shape our food and land systems, while empowering students to envision and help build an equitable, just, sovereign, and healthy land future. Although this is an online course, there will be a strong emphasis on community engagement and in-class participation. If you are interested in enrolling in this course, please apply by Friday, March 12, 2021 through the following form: https://bit.ly/37yO9Tk.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Scott, D. (PI)

EARTHSYS 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (ENERGY 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, homework assignments, virtual field trips, and a small-group discussion section once a week for 50 minutes (live participation is required, many different times will be offered). Lectures will be recorded and available on Canvas. No in-person field trips will be offered for AY 2020-2021 ¿ but alumni of the class can optionally attend field trips in future quarters. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 105B: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (BIO 105B)

Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve an upper-division course, aims to help students learn ecology and natural history using a living laboratory, the Jasper Ridge Preserve. The course's central goal is that, as a community of learning, we examine via introductory discussions, followed by hands-on experiences in the field, the scientific basis of: ecological research, archaeology, edaphology, geology, hydrology, species interactions, land management, and multidisciplinary environmental education. The 10 sessions that compose the academic program are led by the instructors, faculty (world-experts on the themes of each session), and JRBP staff. In addition, this class trains students to become JRBP Docents that therefore join the Jasper Ridge education affiliates community. After completing this course, and as new affiliates of Jasper Ridge, participants will be able to lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education activities available to members of the JRBP community.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

EARTHSYS 113: Earthquakes and Volcanoes (GEOPHYS 90)

Is the "Big One" overdue in California? What kind of damage would that cause? What can we do to reduce the impact of such hazards in urban environments? Does "fracking" cause earthquakes and are we at risk? Is the United States vulnerable to a giant tsunami? The geologic record contains evidence of volcanic super eruptions throughout Earth's history. What causes these gigantic explosive eruptions, and can they be predicted in the future? This course will address these and related issues. For non-majors and potential Earth scientists. No prerequisites. More information at: https://stanford.box.com/s/zr8ar28efmuo5wtlj6gj2jbxle76r4lu
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Segall, P. (PI)
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