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1 - 10 of 42 results for: EARTHSYS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

EARTHSYS 8: The Oceans: An Introduction to the Marine Environment (ESS 8)

The course will provide a basic understanding of how the ocean functions as a suite of interconnected ecosystems, both naturally and under the influence of human activities. Emphasis is on the interactions between the physical and chemical environment and the dominant organisms of each ecosystem. The types of ecosystems discussed include coral reefs, deep-sea hydrothermal vents, coastal upwelling systems, blue-water oceans, estuaries, and near-shore dead zones. Lectures, multimedia presentations, group activities, and tide-pooling day trip.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 9: Public Service Internship Preparation (EDUC 9, HUMBIO 9, PUBLPOL 74, URBANST 101)

Are you prepared for your internship this summer? This workshop series will help you make the most of your internship experience by setting learning goals in advance; negotiating and communicating clear roles and expectations; preparing for a professional role in a non-profit, government, or community setting; and reflecting with successful interns and community partners on how to prepare sufficiently ahead of time. You will read, discuss, and hear from guest speakers, as well as develop a learning plan specific to your summer or academic year internship placement. This course is primarily designed for students who have already identified an internship for summer or a later quarter. You are welcome to attend any and all workshops, but must attend the entire series and do the assignments for 1 unit of credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EARTHSYS 11: Introduction to Geology (GEOLSCI 1)

Why are earthquakes, volcanoes, and natural resources located at specific spots on the Earth surface? Why are there rolling hills to the west behind Stanford, and soaring granite walls to the east in Yosemite? What was the Earth like in the past, and what will it be like in the future? Lectures, hands-on laboratories, in-class activities, and one field trip will help you see the Earth through the eyes of a geologist. Topics include plate tectonics, the cycling and formation of different types of rocks, and how geologists use rocks to understand Earth's history.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Sperling, E. (PI)

EARTHSYS 22: Introduction to Landscape Architecture: Urban Ecology and Environmental Design

This 4-week long course is an introduction to landscape architecture, covering a brief history of the field, making connections between science and sustainable and resilient urban ecosystems, and exploring a range of projects and topics that landscape architects touch. From public spaces to streetscapes to shorelines and trails, landscape architecture projects combine art and science in the pursuit of connecting and engaging humans with the built and natural environments. The practice can be used to achieve and engage in complex goals such as climate resilience, environmental restoration, habitat creation, green infrastructure planning, and aesthetic appeal. Through targeted readings, lectures, thoughtful discussions, and foundational assignments encouraging students to get outside and observe their surrounding landscape and campus, students will receive an introduction to landscape architecture and engage with a creative application of earth systems science.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

EARTHSYS 39Q: Talking about Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Floods: Science Communication and Natural Hazards

In an age of fake news, how do we communicate the importance of scientific facts? How do we compel action from an individual to a national level when the facts alone aren¿t enough? In this class you will learn the basic tools of science communication through the lens of natural hazards such as earthquakes, volcanoes, and extreme weather. You will learn the basics of the science that drives these hazards, and how to communicate that science to different audiences. Recent research has shown that relaying scientific knowledge alone to potentially vulnerable populations does not have a significant impact on increasing their resilience to those hazards. Therefore, it is increasingly important to train a new generation of science communicators and translators who can effectively relay complex information in engaging and understandable ways. This will be a hands-on course where you will be working individually and in small groups to discuss class topics, share, and peer review each other¿s writing each week. This course satisfies the Write 2 requirement for undergraduates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: Writing 2
Instructors: Phillips, K. (PI)

EARTHSYS 46N: Exploring the Critical Interface between the Land and Monterey Bay: Elkhorn Slough (ESS 46N)

Preference to freshmen. Field trips to sites in the Elkhorn Slough, a small agriculturally impacted estuary that opens into Monterey Bay, a model ecosystem for understanding the complexity of estuaries, and one of California's last remaining coastal wetlands. Readings include Jane Caffrey's Changes in a California Estuary: A Profile of Elkhorn Slough. Basics of biogeochemistry, microbiology, oceanography, ecology, pollution, and environmental management.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Francis, C. (PI)

EARTHSYS 102: Fundamentals of Renewable Power (ENERGY 102)

Do you want a much better understanding of renewable power technologies? Did you know that wind and solar are the fastest growing forms of electricity generation? Are you interested in hearing about the most recent, and future, designs for green power? Do you want to understand what limits power extraction from renewable resources and how current designs could be improved? This course dives deep into these and related issues for wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, tidal and wave power technologies. We welcome all student, from non-majors to MBAs and grad students. If you are potentially interested in an energy or environmental related major, this course is particularly useful. Recommended: Math 21 or 42.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 103: Understanding Energy (CEE 107A, CEE 207A)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

EARTHSYS 104: The Water Course (EARTHSYS 204, GEOPHYS 104, GEOPHYS 204)

The Central Valley of California provides a third of the produce grown in the U.S., but recent droughts and increasing demand have raised concerns about both food and water security. The pathway that water takes from rainfall to the irrigation of fields or household taps (¿the water course¿) determines the quantity and quality of the available water. Working with various data sources (measurements made on the ground, in wells, and from satellites) allows us to model the water budget in the valley and explore the recent impacts on freshwater supplies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA

EARTHSYS 105B: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (BIO 105B)

Formerly 96B - Jasper Ridge Docent Training. Second of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve. These topics are presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course. NOTE: All classes take place at Jasper Ridge.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
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