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1 - 10 of 16 results for: DLCL ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

DLCL 13: Humanities Core: Great Books, Big Ideas -- Europe, Modern (FRENCH 13, HISTORY 239C, HUMCORE 13, PHIL 13)

This three-quarter sequence asks big questions of major texts in the European and American tradition. What is a good life? How should society be organized? Who belongs? How should honor, love, sin, and similar abstractions govern our actions? What duty do we owe to the past and future? This third and final quarter focuses on the modern period, from the rise of revolutionary ideas to the experiences of totalitarianism and decolonization in the twentieth century. Authors include Locke, Mary Shelley, Marx, Nietzsche, Freud, Weber, Primo Levi, and Frantz Fanon.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ER

DLCL 33: Humanities Core: Global Identity, Culture, and Politics from the Middle East (COMPLIT 33, HUMCORE 33)

How do we face the future? What resources do we have? Which power structures hold us back and which empower us? What are our identities at college in the Bay Area? In 1850s Lebanon, Abu Faris Shidyaq faced all these same questions (except the last one; he was a Christian magazine editor). In this course we will engage with claims about identity, culture, and politics that some might say come from the "Middle East" but that we understand as global. Ganzeer's graphic novel is as much for California as it is for Egypt. Ataturk's speech is about power and identity just like Donald Trump is about power and identity. In Turkish novels and in Arabic poetry, the people we engage in this course look to their pasts and our futures. What happens next? This is the third of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

DLCL 102: 10 Jobs in 10 Weeks: Leveraging Your Liberal Arts Career

This course is designed to give students a taste of 10 career fields in 10 weeks. Each week features an alum from a different industry, and a hands-on project pulled from their typical workday. Students also collaborate on exercises that teach them to articulate the core skills humanities and arts students bring to the table. Priority to undergraduates in the humanities and arts. For more information, see https://beam.stanford.edu/students/bachelors-co-terms-masters/courses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

DLCL 123: Medieval Journeys: Introduction through the Art and Architecture (ARTHIST 105B, ARTHIST 305B)

The course explores the experience and imagination of medieval journeys through an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural, and skills-based approaches. As a foundations class, this survey of medieval culture engages in particular the art and architecture of the period. The Middle Ages is presented as a network of global economies, fueled by a desire for natural resources, access to luxury goods and holy sites. We will study a large geographical area encompassing the British Isles, Europe, the Mediterranean, Central Asia, India, and East Africa and trace the connectivity of these lands in economic, political, religious, and artistic terms from the fourth to the fourteenth century C.E. The students will have two lectures and one discussion session per week. Depending on the size of the class, it is possible that a graduate student TA will run the discussion session. Our goal is to give a skills-oriented approach to the Middle Ages and to engage students in creative projects that will satisfy 1. Ways-Creative Expression requirement as well as one of the following two: Ways-Analytical Interpretive or Ways-Engaging Difference. NOTE: for AY 2018-19 HISTORY 115D Europe in the Middle Ages, 300-1500 counts for DLCL 123.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-CE, WAY-ED

DLCL 143: The Novel and the World (COMPLIT 123)

The European Design of the Novel. The course will trace the development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones from the 17th century to the present. Works by Cervantes, Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Queirós, Kafka, Woolf, Verga, and Rodoreda.

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

DLCL 189C: Honors Thesis Seminar

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Planning, researching, and writing an honors thesis. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Research and writing methodologies, and larger critical issues in literary studies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit

DLCL 199: Honors Thesis Oral Presentation

For undergraduate majors in DLCL departments; required for honors students. Oral presentations and peer workshops. Regular advisory meetings required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

DLCL 221: Materia

Materia is a focal group on post-anthropocentrism, Latin Americanist and otherwise. Building on and expanding the theoretical framework offered by thinkers such as Fernando Ortiz, Bruno Latour, and Jane Bennett, we engage with works of literature and criticism that de-center the human as object of study. To earn the unit, undergraduate and graduate students should attend the workshops held by the focal group, prepare the pre-circulated readings, and actively contribute to discussion throughout the year. The latter can take place during plenary, over office hours with faculty coordinators, or via contributions to the focal group's online platforms. A short quarterly response paper that relates group discussions with the student's ongoing research is recommended. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

DLCL 222: Philosophy and Literature

The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Students may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must do one of the following three things: (a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages; (b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop; (c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year¿s activities, and meet with him/her for a discussion of that reading. For details, please refer to the Philosophy+Literature web site: http://phi more »
The Focal Group in Philosophy and Literature brings together scholars and students from eight departments to investigate questions in aesthetics and literary theory, philosophically-inflected literary texts, and the form of philosophical writings. Fields of interest include both continental and analytic philosophy, as well as cognitive science, political philosophy, rational choice theory, and related fields. Students may sign up for a unit of credit each quarter via DLCL 222. To earn the unit, students must do one of the following three things: (a) attend an event hosted by the Philosophy and Literature group (including events hosted by the graduate workshop) and write up a reaction paper of 2-5 pages; (b) present a paper of their own to the graduate workshop; (c) agree with one of the DLCL 222 instructors on a reading related to the year¿s activities, and meet with him/her for a discussion of that reading. For details, please refer to the Philosophy+Literature web site: http://philit.stanford.edu/programs/dlcl222. Prerequisite for undergraduates: undergraduate students wishing to take DLCL 222 must previously have taken the philosophy and literature gateway course PHIL 81 ( CLASSICS 42, COMPLIT 181, ENGLISH 81, FRENCH 181, GERMAN 181, ITALIAN 181, SLAVIC 181) or a class taught by one of the instructors of DLCL 222.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

DLCL 223: Renaissances

The Renaissances Group brings together faculty members and students from several departments at Stanford to consider the present and future of early modern literary studies (a period spanning the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries). Taking seriously the plural form of the group's name, we seek to explore the early modern period from a wide range of disciplinary, cultural, linguistic, and geographical perspectives.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Greene, R. (PI)
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