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1 - 10 of 43 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 22SI: SENSA Labs Social Enterprise Seminar

As a social entrepreneur, how do you know you¿re solving the right problem? What values, approaches, and strategies differentiate a social enterprise from other startups? What does it take to build a venture that is both socially-minded and profitable? Through engaging with influential speakers, course-long mentors, case studies, and hands-on workshops, students will gain the skills needed to build, pitch, and manage a social venture. Expert Silicon Valley speakers and mentors encourage networking as well as peer to peer learning. The course culminates in Demo Day, an event in which teams pitch their ideas directly to experienced investors. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand the field of social entrepreneurship through the tenets of Sustainability, Impact and Performance, Innovation, and Leadership; apply the theories from the Lean Startup and Social Business Models to an identified need; and measure the impact of a social enterprise and synthesize social entrepreneurship concepts through investor pitching. Limited enrollment. Application required: https://forms.gle/k9NFcETszUqqryjD6
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

CSRE 27SI: Revolution and the Pilipinx Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities (ASNAMST 27SI)

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

CSRE 51C: Race in Medicine (AFRICAAM 51C, BIOE 91C, CEE 151C, HUMBIO 71C, STS 51C)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Spring quarter focuses on medicine. How do race and racism affect medical research and medical care? What accounts for health disparities among racial groups? What are the history, ethics, legal, and social issues surrounding racialized medical experiments and treatments? Invited speakers will address these and other issues. Talks will take a variety of forms: conversations, interviews, panels, and others. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 6 times (up to 6 units total)

CSRE 101P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

In this course, we will learn from long-time organizers and change agents by studying movement histories, participating in skill-building workshops, and engaging directly in movement-building work with community partners from the Bay Area. Through selected readings curated in collaboration with community partners, we will dive into the stories, tactics, principles, methodologies, and theories of what it means to build community, enact social change, and challenge institutional forms of knowledge production. The goal of this course is to provide us with strategic frameworks and hands-on experiences of creating alternative futures in the now. To meet these goals, students will volunteer a total of 25 hours with a local community partner.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5
Instructors: De Loney, M. (PI)

CSRE 103: Intergroup Communication (PSYCH 103)

In an increasingly globalized world, our ability to connect and engage with new audiences is directly correlated with our competence and success in any field How do our intergroup perceptions and reactions influence our skills as communicators? This course uses experiential activities and discussion sections to explore the role of social identity in effective communication. The objective of the course is to examine and challenge our explicit and implicit assumptions about various groups to enhance our ability to successfully communicate across the complex web of identity. NOTE: Please check the Notes section under each quarter to view the current enrollment survey.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED

CSRE 103F: Intergroup Communication Facilitation (PSYCH 103F)

Are you interested in strengthening your skills as a facilitator or section leader? Interested in opening up dialogue around identity within your community or among friends? This course will provide you with facilitation tools and practice, but an equal part of the heart of this class will come from your own reflection on the particular strengths and challenges you may bring to facilitation and how to craft a personal style that works best for you. This reflection process is ongoing, for the instructors as well as the students.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 2 | Repeatable for credit

CSRE 106A: A.I.-Activism-Art (ARTHIST 168A, ENGLISH 106A, SYMSYS 168A)

Lecture/studio course exploring arts and humanities scholarship and practice engaging with, and generated by, emerging emerging and exponential technologies. Our course will explore intersections of art and artificial intelligence with an emphasis on social impact and racial justice. Open to all undergraduates.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

CSRE 121: Discourse of the Colonized: Native American and Indigenous Voices (NATIVEAM 121)

Using the assigned texts covering the protest movements in the 20th century to the texts written from the perspective of the colonized at the end of the 20th century, students will engage in discussions on decolonization. Students will be encouraged to critically explore issues of interest through two short papers and a 15-20 minute presentation on the topic of interest relating to decolonization for Native Americans in one longer paper. Approaching research from an Indigenous perspective will be encouraged throughout.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:EC-AmerCul

CSRE 123C: "Third World Problems?" Environmental Anthropology and the Intersectionality of Justice (ANTHRO 123C)

As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as more »
As the Flint, Michigan water situation began to attract attention and condemnation, Michigan State Representative, Sheldon Neeley, describing the troops on the ground and the Red Cross distributing water bottles, said that the Governor had "turned an American city into a Third World country [...] it's terrible what he's done [...] no fresh water. Then, at a Congressional hearing, the Chairman of the House Oversight & Government Reform Committee said, "This is the United States of America - this isn't supposed to happen here. We are not some Third World country."nWhat is a "third world problem?" This introductory environmental anthropology course examines how such imaginaries materialize in development programmes and literature, and bespeak charged geopolitical and racial histories; and invites reflection on what futures for working in common they enable/constrain. We will examine how crises are imagined and constructed, and the governance regimes they give rise to. How does water - as natural resource, public good, human right, need, or commodity - determine the contours of such regimes? We will also study chronic, quieter environmental problems and the responses they (do not) generate. Working through a variety of writing genres - ethnographies, policy literature, and legal and corporate publicity material - will enable students to appreciate what anthropology can contribute to the conversation on environmental justice, and state and corporate bureaucracies and their mandates. The course draws on examples from a wide range of settings. The course is offered as an introduction to environmental anthropology and takes students through key themes - infrastructure, race, class, privatization, justice, violence - by focusing on water. It requires no background in anthropology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Hayat, M. (PI)
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