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1 - 10 of 38 results for: CSRE

CSRE 11SI: Leadership at Stanford

This class will explore the role of student government, decision-making and advocacy in a major research university setting such as Stanford. Designed to prepare new student leaders for their legislative responsibilities, the class will incorporate presentations from university stakeholders along with experiential learning exercises and individual class projects. Topics of study include understanding the role and responsibilities of student government in a university setting, institutional change, decision-making, advocacy and conflict resolution. Students will also study ASSU governing documents, effective funding and event planning processes and roles. They will gain awareness of how to understand and engage with a complex and decentralized organization such as Stanford while honing their leadership skills. They will develop a project they wish to pursue as an elected leader and receive mentorship from university administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Howe, N. (PI)

CSRE 21: African American Vernacular English (AFRICAAM 21, LINGUIST 65, LINGUIST 265)

Vocabulary, pronunciation and grammatical features of the systematic and vibrant vernacular English [AAVE] spoken by African Americans in the US, its historical relation to British dialects, and to English creoles spoken on the S. Carolina Sea Islands (Gullah), in the Caribbean, and in W. Africa. The course will also explore the role of AAVE in the Living Arts of African Americans, as exemplified by writers, preachers, comedians and actors, singers, toasters and rappers, and its connections with challenges that AAVE speakers face in the classroom and courtroom. Service Learning Course (certified by Haas Center). UNITS: 3-5 units. Most students should register for 4 units. Students willing and able to tutor an AAVE speaking child in East Palo Alto and write an additional paper about the experience may register for 5 units, but should consult the instructor first. Students who, for exceptional reasons, need a reduced course load, may request a reduction to 3 units, but more of their course grade will come from exams, and they will be excluded from group participation in the popular AAVE Happenin at the end of the course.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, GER:EC-AmerCul, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CSRE 27SI: Revolution and the Pilipinx Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

CSRE 33SI: Examining Access for FLI Students in Higher Education

Stanford's past two presidents have steadfastly declared Stanford as a vehicle of upwards mobility and to correct inequalities. Essentially, this means providing sufficient access to students who often are most in need: first-generation and/or low-income (FLI) students. However, what exactly is access? How can we understand different kinds of access in order to improve the holistic quality of education students receive?nnTo answer these questions, we will define access and the forces which shape it, such as economic systems, intersectionality, and the educational pipeline. Next, to better prepare ourselves as advocates for educational improvement, we will examine the historical trend of access at colleges as case studies (Stanford, Berkeley, Foothills, and Brown). Finally, we will ask how accessibility influences how students fare after leaving the educational system.nnUltimately, we will gain analytical and heuristic techniques to pinpoint and advocate for improvements to educational access for FLI students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Wolf, J. (PI)

CSRE 41A: Genes and Identity (AFRICAAM 41, ANTHRO 41)

In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations more »
In recent decades genes have increasingly become endowed with the cultural power to explain many aspects of human life: physical traits, diseases, behaviors, ancestral histories, and identity. In this course we will explore a deepening societal intrigue with genetic accounts of personal identity and political meaning. Students will engage with varied interdisciplinary sources that range from legal cases to scientific articles, medical ethics guidelines, films, and anthropological works (ethnographies). We will explore several case studies where the use of DNA markers (as proof of heritage, disease risk, or legal standing) has spawned cultural movements that are biosocial in nature. Throughout we will look at how new social movements are organized around gene-based definitions of personhood, health, and legal truth. Several examples include political analyses of citizenship and belonging. On this count we will discuss issues of African ancestry testing as evidence in slavery reparations cases, revisit debates on whether Black Freedman should be allowed into the Cherokee and Seminole Nations, and hear arguments on whether people with genetic links to Jewish groups should have a right of return to Israel. We will also examine the ways genetic knowledge may shape different health politics at the individual and societal level. On this count we will do close readings of how personal genomics testing companies operate, we will investigate how health disparities funding as well as orphan disease research take on new valences when re-framed in genetic terms, and we will see how new articulations of global health priorities are emerging through genetic research in places like Africa. Finally we will explore social implications of forensic uses of DNA. Here we will examine civil liberties concerns about genetic familial searching in forensic databases that disproportionately target specific minority groups as criminal suspects, and inquire into the use of DNA to generate digital mugshots of suspects that re-introduce genetic concepts of race.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED, WAY-SI | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CSRE 92D: Arab and Arab-American Poetry (ENGLISH 92AP)

In this introductory course, students will write and read widely, exploring various aspects of poetic craft, including imagery, metaphor, line, stanza, music, rhythm, diction, and tone. The course will focus primarily on the rich and varied tradition of Arab and Arab-American poets, with a special emphasis on contemporary poets exploring the intersections of cultural identity, nationhood, race, gender, and sexuality. The first half of the course will consist of close reading a selection of poems, while the second half of the course will consist of workshopping student writing. Through peer critique, students respond closely to the work of fellow writers in a supportive workshop. Writers at all levels of experience and comfort with poetry are welcome.
Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shanahan, C. (PI)

CSRE 95I: Revolutionary Practices: Space and Public Discourse in Iran (GLOBAL 145)

Description: This course examines the mediums of public art that have been voices of social change, protest and expressions of community desire in Iran. It will offer a unique glimpse into Iran¿s contemporary art and visual culture through the investigation of public art practices such as graffiti and street art, as well as older traditions of Naghali and Iranian Coffeehouse Painting.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ebtekar, A. (PI)

CSRE 100P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

This course explores student and community organizing history, theories of practice, as well as models of social change through a mix of guest speakers from social justice groups, theoretical readings and practicum-based work. The major component of this course is participating in an intensive three-day skills-based training that will teach students how to be more strategic in their fight for justice on campus and in the community. The training consists of a series of presentations, exercises, and discussions that teach sets of skills and concepts related to student and community organizing. The course is designed for students with interests in student and community organizing, as well as those considering careers and leadership opportunities in a variety of nonprofit and social justice fields. This is designated as a one-unit course, with a community engaged learning option for two additional units. The dates for intensive skills-based training will be May 4th-6th. This training is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 101P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

This course explores student and community organizing history, theories of practice, as well as models of social change through a mix of guest speakers from social justice groups, theoretical readings and practicum-based work. The major component of this course is participating in an intensive three-day skills-based training that will teach students how to be more strategic in their fight for justice on campus and in the community. The training consists of a series of presentations, exercises, and discussions that teach sets of skills and concepts related to student and community organizing. The course is designed for students with interests in student and community organizing, as well as those considering careers and leadership opportunities in a variety of nonprofit and social justice fields. This is designated as a one-unit course, with a community engaged learning option for two additional units. The dates for the intensive skills-based training will be May 4th-6th. The training is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Marquez, R. (PI)
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