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1 - 10 of 46 results for: CSRE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CSRE 1V: A History of Race

This course will survey the idea of race and its history. We will focus our attention on the construction of the idea of race, and we will trace the ways in which this concept has changed over time. The course will start with a panel discussion on definitions of race in history, and as presented in different academic disciplines today. This discussion will be followed by two lectures tracing histories of race from Antiquity until the twentieth century. The last session will be a roundtable on the continuing role of race in the United States today. Covered topics will include explicit and implicit bias, institutionalized racism, race and criminal justice, equal justice initiatives and protests, racial stratification. The roles of politics, economics, science, religion, and nationalism, as well as the relationships between race, gender, and class will also be discussed. Course must be taken for 3 units to count toward WAYS requirement. This course will meet 5 times, starting MONDAY January 14th, and ending the last day of class Monday, February 25th.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lamotte, M. (PI)

CSRE 11SI: Leadership at Stanford

This class will explore the role of student government, decision-making and advocacy in a major research university setting such as Stanford. Designed to prepare new student leaders for their legislative responsibilities, the class will incorporate presentations from university stakeholders along with experiential learning exercises and individual class projects. Topics of study include understanding the role and responsibilities of student government in a university setting, institutional change, decision-making, advocacy and conflict resolution. Students will also study ASSU governing documents, effective funding and event planning processes and roles. They will gain awareness of how to understand and engage with a complex and decentralized organization such as Stanford while honing their leadership skills. They will develop a project they wish to pursue as an elected leader and receive mentorship from university administrators.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CSRE 16A: Dynamic Australia: immigrant and indigenous experiences

How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several more focused questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? As a course project, students will informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration in history - as articul more »
How did modern Australian society take shape? Within this larger framework, several more focused questions will guide us: What have been the experiences of immigrants, of Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders, and how have their relations evolved over time? To what degree has Australia been formed by successive waves of immigration? What has been the fate of the Aboriginal peoples? How have intergroup relations evolved since the start of colonialism in the late 18th century? What have been the elements of racial formation, and how have they changed over time? What does it mean to be Australian in the 21st century? How might the creative arts (e.g. music, literature, drama, painting, dance) help us understand Australian identities and intergroup dynamics? As a course project, students will informally interview someone whose life history has involved large-scale displacement, voluntary or otherwise. This is intended as a means of sharpening awareness of migration in history - as articulated at the level of individuals and communities. This course is primarily intended for students enrolled in or waitlisted for the BOSP Summer Seminar in Sydney (June-July 2019), and as such focuses on historical and social milieux. However, all participants will find it a wide-ranging introduction to Australian society and a case study in intergroup dynamics.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CSRE 22SI: SENSA Labs Social Enterprise Seminar

The Labs class will meet two times a week for 80 minutes. In the first half of the week, influential speakers will provide a brief introduction to the class on their specialty and then the class will break into 1:1 sessions; each team will get around 10-15 minutes to pose company-specific questions to the speaker. During this time the TAs will be present to facilitate discussion among the teams regarding the speaker's opening remarks as well as information obtained during the 1:1 sessions. The aim of this is to encourage networking as well as peer to peer learning. The second half of the week, every Thursday, will consist of one-on-one mentoring sessions between each group and their assigned mentor. Each group will have the same mentor for the entirety of the quarter, and we will try to assign mentors based on the focuses and sectors of each labs team. The course culminates in Demo Day, an event in which teams pitch their ideas directly to experienced investors. At the end of the cours more »
The Labs class will meet two times a week for 80 minutes. In the first half of the week, influential speakers will provide a brief introduction to the class on their specialty and then the class will break into 1:1 sessions; each team will get around 10-15 minutes to pose company-specific questions to the speaker. During this time the TAs will be present to facilitate discussion among the teams regarding the speaker's opening remarks as well as information obtained during the 1:1 sessions. The aim of this is to encourage networking as well as peer to peer learning. The second half of the week, every Thursday, will consist of one-on-one mentoring sessions between each group and their assigned mentor. Each group will have the same mentor for the entirety of the quarter, and we will try to assign mentors based on the focuses and sectors of each labs team. The course culminates in Demo Day, an event in which teams pitch their ideas directly to experienced investors. At the end of the course, students will be able to understand the field of social entrepreneurship through the tenets of Sustainability, Impact and Performance, Innovation, and Leadership; apply the theories from the Lean Startup and Social Business Models to an identified need; and measure the impact of a social enterprise and synthesize social entrepreneurship concepts through investor pitching.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2

CSRE 24SI: The Continuity of Abu Nuwas's Homoeroticism in Arab Queer Literary Modernity

This course will hold space for discussions surrounding the precolonial poetic foundations of Arab Queerness, the continuity of such foundations in its modern literary representations, and he potential Arab Queer futurities that such modern representations move toward. How are representations of homoeroticism in Abu Nuwas's poetry definitive of a pre-colonial Arab Queer identity that is separate from Western definitions of Queerness rooted in the Gay Liberation movement of the 1970s? Do modern literary representations of queerness in Arab literature, even after US sociopolitical imperialism, carry a central understanding of Arab Queerness? How is the earlier explored Pre-Colonial Arab Queerness carried forward in these modern Arab Queer literary representations? Are there differences? How do these literary understandings and analyses inform the greater theoretical discussion of queer past, present, and future? Readings will include poetry by classical Arab-Persian poet Abu Nuwas, and novels by Saleem Haddad, Abdellah Taïa, and Mohammed Abdel Nabi. These works will be discussed within a theoretical framework informed by the works of Joseph Massad, Sara Ahmed, Jose Esteban Muñoz, Eve Sedgwick, and Jaspir Puar.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Marquez, R. (PI)

CSRE 27SI: Revolution and the Pilipinx Diaspora: Exploring Global Activism in Local Communities (ASNAMST 27SI)

This course aims to provide students with an opportunity to not only learn about current issues in the local Filipino American community, but also develop their own plans to take action on social justice issues. Through mediums of art and reflection, we will explore themes of diaspora and liberation by focusing on the Filipino experience and the local and vocal histories of activism in the Bay Area. We will be connecting local histories to the current global narrative while also connecting our past to our own identity formation as activists and community leaders. In doing so, we hope to explore the implications of local activism within the greater context of global organizing. The course will expose students to local community leaders and ways in which they can support and plug in to local initiatives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Antonio, A. (PI)

CSRE 33SI: Examining Access for FLI Students in Higher Education

Stanford's past two presidents have steadfastly declared Stanford as a vehicle of upwards mobility and to correct inequalities. Essentially, this means providing sufficient access to students who often are most in need: first-generation and/or low-income (FLI) students. However, what exactly is access? How can we understand different kinds of access in order to improve the holistic quality of education students receive?nnTo answer these questions, we will define access and the forces which shape it, such as economic systems, intersectionality, and the educational pipeline. Next, to better prepare ourselves as advocates for educational improvement, we will examine the historical trend of access at colleges as case studies (Stanford, Berkeley, Foothills, and Brown). Finally, we will ask how accessibility influences how students fare after leaving the educational system.nnUltimately, we will gain analytical and heuristic techniques to pinpoint and advocate for improvements to educational access for FLI students.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CSRE 55M: MMUF Seminar

This seminar is designed to help MMUF honor students in the following ways: (1) developing and refining research paper topics, (2) learning about the various approaches to research and writing, and (3) connecting to Stanford University resources such as the library and faculty. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CSRE 100P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

CSRE 100P is a series of community organizing trainings focused on how to use grassroots techniques as a means of political participation. The course is run in partnership with Stanford in Government (SIG), Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU), and different campus groups. Students will have the opportunity to hear from top experts in grassroots and community organizing. They will also have the chance to engage directly with the speakers on how their experiences have shaped their approach to and understanding political organizing in the current political environment. This course will meet over six sessions, two Friday sessions and four Saturday sessions. Dates of Saturday Trainings are April 13, May 4, May 11and June 1. Friday sessions are April 5th and June 7th (12:00pm-2:00pm).
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CSRE 101P: Student and Community Organizing for Social Change

This course explores student and community organizing history, theories of practice, as well as models of social change through a mix of guest speakers from social justice groups, theoretical readings and practicum-based work. The major component of this course is participating in an intensive three-day skills-based training that will teach students how to be more strategic in their fight for justice on campus and in the community. The training consists of a series of presentations, exercises, and discussions that teach sets of skills and concepts related to student and community organizing. The course is designed for students with interests in student and community organizing, as well as those considering careers and leadership opportunities in a variety of nonprofit and social justice fields. This is designated as a one-unit course, with a community engaged learning option for two additional units. The dates for the intensive skills-based training will be May 4th-6th. The training is required.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
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