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1 - 10 of 105 results for: CS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1
Instructors: Zelenski, J. (PI)

CS 11SI: How to Make VR: Introduction to Virtual Reality Design and Development

In this hands-on, experiential course, students will design and develop virtual reality applications. You'll learn how to use the Unity game engine, the most popular platform for creating immersive applications. The class will teach the design best-practices and the creation pipeline for VR applications. Students will work in groups to present a final project in building an application for the Oculus Go headset. Enrollment is limited and by application only. See https://cs11si.stanford.edu for more information. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (INTLPOL 200)

Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems are free of algorithmic bias and respect human ethical principles? What role will they play in our system of justice and the practice of law? How will they be used or abused in democratic societies and autocratic regimes? Will they alter the geopolitical balance of power, and change the nature of warfare? The goal of CS22a is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

CS 41: Hap.py Code: The Python Programming Language

The fundamentals and contemporary usage of the Python programming language. Primary focus is on developing best practices in writing Python and exploring the extensible and unique parts of the Python language. Topics include: Pythonic conventions, data structures such as list comprehensions, anonymous functions, iterables, and powerful built-ins (e.g. map, filter, zip). We will also focus on data analysis tools including NumPy, Pandas, Matplotlib, and Scikit-learn for their application in machine learning. Prerequisite: CS106B, CS106X, or equivalent. Application required.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 43: Functional Programming Abstractions

This course covers the fundamentals of functional programming and algebraic type systems, and explores a selection of related programming paradigms and current research. Haskell is taught and used throughout the course, though much of the material is applicable to other languages. Material will be covered from both theoretical and practical points of view, and topics will include higher order functions, immutable data structures, algebraic data types, type inference, lenses and optics, effect systems, concurrency and parallelism, and dependent types. Prerequisites: Programming maturity and comfort with math proofs, at the levels of CS107 and CS103.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Get real-world experience researching and developing your own social impact project! Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Main class components are workshops, community discussions, guest speakers and mentorship. Studio provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their project ideas and Minimum Viable Product prototypes with stakeholders and the public. Application required; please see cs51.stanford.edu for more information.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 58N: The Blockchain Revolution Will Not Be Televised

This seminar will explore the nature of revolutions supported and enabled by technological change, using the Internet and smart phone as two historical examples and focusing on blockchain technology and potential applications such as money, banking, supply chain and market trading. In this project-based course, one meeting per week will bring in new information, including visiting experts. Other class meetings will involve team work, presentations, and discussion. Each student will help lead a section; the class collectively will produce a final book/movie/blog, in a medium selected by the class.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Mitchell, J. (PI)

CS 80Q: Race and Gender in Silicon Valley (AFRICAAM 80Q)

Join us as we go behind the scenes of some of the big headlines about trouble in Silicon Valley. We'll start with the basic questions like who decides who gets to see themselves as "a computer person," and how do early childhood and educational experiences shape our perceptions of our relationship to technology? Then we'll see how those questions are fundamental to a wide variety of recent events from #metoo in tech companies, to the ways the under-representation of women and people of color in tech companies impacts the kinds of products that Silicon Valley brings to market. We'll see how data and the coming age of AI raise the stakes on these questions of identity and technology. How can we ensure that AI technology will help reduce bias in human decision-making in areas from marketing to criminal justice, rather than amplify it?
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ED
Instructors: Lee, C. (PI)

CS 83: Playback Theater

Playback combines elements of theater, community work and storytelling. In a playback show, a group of actors and musicians create an improvised performance based on the audience's personal stories. A playback show brings about a powerful listening and sharing experience. During the course, we will tell, listen, play together, and train in playback techniques. We will write diaries to process our experience in the context of education and research. The course is aimed to strengthen listening abilities, creativity and the collaborative spirit, all integral parts of doing great science. In playback, as in research, we are always moving together, from the known, to the unknown, and back. There is limited enrollment for this class. Application is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Reingold, O. (PI)

CS 91SI: Digital Canvas: An Introduction to UI/UX Design

Become familiar with prototype-design tools like Sketch and Marvel while also learning important design concepts in a low-stress environment. Focus is on the application of UI/UX design concepts to actual user interfaces: the creation of wireframes, high-fidelity mockups, and clickable prototypes. We will look at what makes a good or bad user interface, effective design techniques, and how to employ these techniques using Sketch and Marvel to make realistic prototypes. This course is ideal for anyone with little to no visual design experience who would like to build their skill set in UI/UX for app or web design. Also ideal for anyone with experience in front or back-end web development or human-computer interaction that would want to sharpen their visual design and analysis skills for UI/UX.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)
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