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1 - 10 of 97 results for: CS

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 11SI: How to Make VR: Introduction to Virtual Reality Design and Development

In this hands-on, experiential course, students will design and develop virtual reality applications. You'll learn how to use the Unity game engine, the most popular platform for creating immersive applications. The class will teach the design best-practices and the creation pipeline for VR applications, and will include tangents that explore sister fields such as augmented reality and 360 video. Students will work in groups to present a final project in building an application for the Oculus Go headset. Enrollment is limited and by rolling application only. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 22A: The Social & Economic Impact of Artificial Intelligence (INTLPOL 200)

(Formerly IPS 200.) Recent advances in computing may place us at the threshold of a unique turning point in human history. Soon we are likely to entrust management of our environment, economy, security, infrastructure, food production, healthcare, and to a large degree even our personal activities, to artificially intelligent computer systems. The prospect of "turning over the keys" to increasingly autonomous systems raises many complex and troubling questions. How will society respond as versatile robots and machine-learning systems displace an ever-expanding spectrum of blue- and white-collar workers? Will the benefits of this technological revolution be broadly distributed or accrue to a lucky few? How can we ensure that these systems respect our ethical principles when they make decisions at speeds and for rationales that exceed our ability to comprehend? What, if any, legal rights and responsibilities should we grant them? And should we regard them merely as sophisticated tools or as a newly emerging form of life? The goal of CS22 is to equip students with the intellectual tools, ethical foundation, and psychological framework to successfully navigate the coming age of intelligent machines.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Kaplan, J. (PI)

CS 41: Hap.py Code: The Python Programming Language

The fundamentals and contemporary usage of the Python programming language. Primary focus on developing best practices in writing Python and exploring the extensible and unique parts of Python that make it such a powerful language. Topics include: data structures (e.g. lists and dictionaries) and characteristic pythonic conventions such as list comprehensions, anonymous functions, iterables, and powerful built-ins (e.g. map, filter, zip). We will also cover object-oriented design, the standard library, and common third-party packages (e.g. requests, pillow). Time permitting, we will explore modern Python-based web frameworks, data science toolkits (numpy, scipy, pandas) and project distribution. Prerequisite: 106B/X or equivalent. Application required.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 43: Functional Programming Abstractions

This course explores the philosophy and fundamentals of functional programming, focusing on the Haskell language, its theoretical underpinnings, and practical applications. Topics include functional abstractions (function composition, higher-order functions), immutable data structures, type systems, and various functional design patterns (monads, etc). Prerequisites: CS107 (or equivalent experience)
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 51: CS + Social Good Studio: Designing Social Impact Projects

Introduces students to the tech + social good space. Students work in small teams to develop high-impact projects around problem domains provided by partner organizations, under the guidance and support of design/technical coaches from industry and non-profit domain experts. Main class components are workshops, community discussions, guest speakers and mentorship. Studio provides an outlet for students to create social change through CS while engaging in the full product development cycle on real-world projects. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their project ideas and Minimum Viable Product prototypes with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 147, equivalent experience, or consent of instructors.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 56N: Great Discoveries and Inventions in Computing

This seminar will explore some of both the great discoveries that underlie computer science and the inventions that have produced the remarkable advances in computing technology. Key questions we will explore include: What is computable? How can information be securely communicated? How do computers fundamentally work? What makes computers fast? Our exploration will look both at the principles behind the discoveries and inventions, as well as the history and the people involved in those events. Some exposure to programming will be helpful, but it not strictly necessary.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Hennessy, J. (PI)

CS 58: You Say You Want a Revolution (Blockchain Edition)

This project-based course will give creative students an opportunity to work together on revolutionary change leveraging blockchain technology. The course will provide opportunities for students to become operationally familiar with blockchain concepts, supported by presentation of blockchain fundamentals at a level accessible to those with or without a strong technical background. Specific topics include: incentives, ethics, crypto-commons, values, FOMO 3D, risks, implications and social good. Students will each discover a new possible use-case for blockchain and prototype their vision for the future accordingly. Application and impact areas may come from medicine, law, economics, history, anthropology, or other sectors. Student diversity of background will be valued highly.
Terms: Win | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 83: Playback Theater For Research

Playback combines elements of theater, community work and storytelling. In a playback show, a group of actors and musicians create an improvised performance based on the audience's personal stories. A playback show brings about a powerful listening and sharing experience. During the course, we will tell, listen, play together, and train in playback techniques. We will write diaries to process our experience in the context of education and research. The course is aimed to strengthen listening abilities, creativity and the collaborative spirit, all integral parts of doing great science. In playback, as in research, we are always moving together, from the known, to the unknown, and back. There is limited enrollment for this class. Application is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Reingold, O. (PI)

CS 100A: Problem-solving Lab for CS106A

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS 106A. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106A required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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