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1 - 10 of 105 results for: CS ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CS 1U: Practical Unix

A practical introduction to using the Unix operating system with a focus on Linux command line skills. Class will consist of video tutorials and weekly hands-on lab sections. Topics include: grep and regular expressions, ZSH, Vim and Emacs, basic and advanced GDB features, permissions, working with the file system, revision control, Unix utilities, environment customization, and using Python for shell scripts. Topics may be added, given sufficient interest. Course website: http://cs1u.stanford.edu
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 11SI: How to Make VR: Introduction to Virtual Reality Design and Development

In this hands-on, experiential course, students will design and develop virtual reality applications. You'll learn how to use the Unity game engine, the most popular platform for creating immersive applications. The class will teach the design best-practices and the creation pipeline for VR applications, and will include tangents that explore sister fields such as augmented reality and 360 video. Students will work in groups to present a final project in building an application for the Oculus Go headset. Enrollment is limited and by rolling application only. Prerequisite: CS 106A or equivalent.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 19SI: Evaluating Education Technology: Developing Frameworks to Make Sense of EdTech

This seminar assesses the impact of education technologies on learners, teachers, and education systems. Through weekly case studies of ed tech ventures, students will experience and evaluate popular education technologies such as VR,npersonalized learning, makerspaces, and MOOCs. Additionally, students will develop a toolkit of concepts including critical pedagogy, constructivism, behaviorism, and social reconstructionism which they can use to assess education technologies and their personal contributions to the field. This course will focus largely on ventures in the U.S., but the frameworks developed will be applicable to equity and access issues in education throughout the world.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 21SI: AI for Social Good

Students will learn about and apply cutting-edge artificial intelligence techniques to real-world social good spaces (such as healthcare, government, education, and environment). Taught jointly by CS+Social Good and the Stanford AI Group, the aim of the class is to empower students to apply these techniques outside of the classroom. The class will focus on techniques from machine learning and deep learning, including regression, support vector machines (SVMs), neural networks, convolutional neural networks (CNNs), and recurrent neural networks (RNNs). The course alternates between lectures on machine learning theory and discussions with invited speakers, who will challenge students to apply techniques in their social good domains. Students complete weekly coding assignments reinforcing machine learning concepts and applications. Prerequisites: programming experience at the level of CS107, mathematical fluency at the level of CS103, comfort with probability at the level of CS109 (or equivalent). Application required for enrollment.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Piech, C. (PI)

CS 45N: Computers and Photography: From Capture to Sharing

Preference to freshmen with experience in photography and use of computers. Elements of photography, such as lighting, focus, depth of field, aperture, and composition. How a photographer makes photos available for computer viewing, reliably stores them, organizes them, tags them, searches them, and distributes them online. No programming experience required. Digital SLRs and editing software will be provided to those students who do not wish to use their own.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CS 49N: Using Bits to Control Atoms

This is a crash course in how to use a stripped-down computer system about the size of a credit card (the rasberry pi computer) to control as many different sensors as we can implement in ten weeks, including LEDs, motion sensors, light controllers, and accelerometers. The ability to fearlessly grab a set of hardware devices, examine the data sheet to see how to use it, and stitch them together using simple code is a secret weapon that software-only people lack, and allows you to build many interesting gadgets. We will start with a "bare metal'' system --- no operating system, no support --- and teach you how to read device data sheets describing sensors and write the minimal code needed to control them (including how to debug when things go wrong, as they always do). This course differs from most in that it is deliberately mostly about what and why rather than how --- our hope is that the things you are able at the end will inspire you to follow the rest of the CS curriculum to understand better how things you've used work. Prerequisites: knowledge of the C programming language. A Linux or Mac laptop that you are comfortable coding on.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Engler, D. (PI)

CS 52: CS + Social Good Studio

Continuation of CS51 (CS + Social Good Studio). Teams enter the quarter having completed and tested a minimal viable product (MVP) with a well-defined target user, and a community partner. Students will learn to apply scalable technical frameworks, methods to measure social impact, tools for deployment, user acquisition techniques and growth/exit strategies. The purpose of the class is to facilitate students to build a sustainable infrastructure around their product idea. CS52 will host mentors, guest speakers and industry experts for various workshops and coaching-sessions. The class culminates in a showcase where students share their projects with stakeholders and the public. Prerequisite: CS 51, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Cain, J. (PI)

CS 53: DISCUSSIONS IN TECH FOR GOOD

This course introduces students to applications of technology to social impact through a weekly discussion and speaker series. Invited speakers come from industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. They will share their work in social impact technology, thoughts on issues of ethics in technology, and personal career paths. Topics span a broad variety of social issues -- from education to healthcare to activism -- and help students better understand how to lead careers in using computer science for social good.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Sahami, M. (PI)

CS 93: Teaching AI

For graduate students who are TA-ing an AI course. This course prepares new AI section leaders to teach, write, and evaluate AI content. In class, you will be evaluating final projects individually and as a group. You will have discussions criticizing papers and assigning grades to them. You will analyze and solve discussion session problems on the board, explain algorithmsnlike backpropagation, and learn how to give constructive feedback to students. The class will also include a guest speaker who will give teaching advice and talk about AI. Focus is on teaching skills, techniques, and final projects grading. The class meets once a week for the first 6 weeks of the quarter.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CS 100A: Problem-solving Lab for CS106A

Additional problem solving practice for the introductory CS course CS 106A. Sections are designed to allow students to acquire a deeper understanding of CS and its applications, work collaboratively, and develop a mastery of the material. Limited enrollment, permission of instructor required. Concurrent enrollment in CS 106A required.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
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