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1 - 10 of 31 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 11Q: Shakespeare, Playing, Gender

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on several of the best and lesser known plays of Shakespeare, on theatrical and other kinds of playing, and on ambiguities of both gender and playing gender.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 107A: Ancient Knowledge, New Frontiers: How the Greek Legacy Became Islamic Science (CLASSICS 47, HUMCORE 121)

What contributions did Arabic and Islamic civilization make to the history of science? This course will read key moments in Greek and Islamic science and philosophy and ask questions about scientific method, philosophy, and religious belief. We will read Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ibn Haytham, and Baha al-Din al-Amili, among others. What is the scientific method and is it universal across time and place? What is Islamic rationality? What is Greek rationality? Who commits to empiricism and who relies on inherited ideas? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Win | Units: 3

COMPLIT 122: Literature as Performance (DLCL 142)

The purpose of this course is to re-embed great dramatic texts in a history and theory of performance, using Bay Area and Stanford productions, audiovisual materials, and your own trans-medial projects to help us reconceive theater off the page, moving in time, space and thought.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum

COMPLIT 134A: Classics of Persian Literature (COMPLIT 234)

The course offers a survey of and introduction to the central works of Persian literature, from the 10th century to our time, across the genres: epic, romance, lyric, and novel. Special attention will be given to the various ways in which the texts continue to resonate in Persian culture. Readings include: the Shahnameh by Ferdowsi (940-1020); Khosrow and Shirin by Nezami (1141-1209); The Conference of the Birds by Attar (1145/46-1221); selections from the masnavi and divan of Rumi (d. 1273); selections from the diva of Hafez (1325/26-1389/90); The Blind Owl by Sadegh Hedayat (1903-1951); selected poems by Nima (1895-1960), Shamlu (1925-2000), Akhavan Sales (1928-1990), and Forugh Farrokhzad (1935-1967); and My Uncle Napoleon by Iraj Pezeshkzad (1928-). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Huber, M. (PI)

COMPLIT 145: Reflection on the Other: The Arab Israeli Conflict in Literature and Film (AMELANG 126, JEWISHST 106)

How literary works outside the realm of Western culture struggle with questions such as identity, minority, and the issue of the Other. How the Arab is viewed in Hebrew literature, film and music and how the Jew is viewed in Palestinian works in Hebrew or Arabic (in translation to English). Historical, political, and sociological forces that have contributed to the shaping of these writers' views. Guest lectures about the Jew in Palestinian literature and music. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 148: Transcultural Perspectives of South-East Asian Music and Arts (COMPLIT 267, FRENCH 260A, MUSIC 146N, MUSIC 246N)

This course will explore the links between aspects of South-East Asian cultures and their influence on modern and contemporary Western art and literature, particularly in France; examples of this influence include Claude Debussy (Gamelan music), Jacques Charpentier (Karnatak music), Auguste Rodin (Khmer art) and Antonin Artaud (Balinese theater). In the course of these interdisciplinary analyses - focalized on music and dance but not limited to it - we will confront key notions in relation to transculturality: orientalism, appropriation, auto-ethnography, nostalgia, exoticism and cosmopolitanism. We will also consider transculturality interior to contemporary creation, through the work of contemporary composers such as Tran Kim Ngoc, Chinary Ung and Tôn-Thât Tiêt. Viewings of sculptures, marionette theater, ballet, opera and cinema will also play an integral role. To satisfy a Ways requirement, this course must be taken for at least 3 units. In AY 2020-21, a letter grade or `CR¿ grade satisfies the Ways requirement. WIM credit in Music at 4 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Kretz, H. (PI)

COMPLIT 154A: Film & Philosophy (ENGLISH 154F, FRENCH 154, ITALIAN 154, PHIL 193C, PHIL 293C)

Issues of authenticity, morality, personal identity, and the value of truth explored through film; philosophical investigation of the filmic medium itself. Screenings to include Blade Runner (Scott), Do The Right Thing (Lee), The Seventh Seal (Bergman), Fight Club (Fincher), La Jetée (Marker), Memento (Nolan), and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (Kaufman). Taught in English.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 161E: Narrative and Narrative Theory (ENGLISH 161)

An introduction to stories and storytelling--that is, to narrative. What is narrative? When is narrative fictional and when non-fictional? How is it done, word by word, sentence by sentence? Must it be in prose? Can it be in pictures? How has storytelling changed over time? Focus on various forms, genres, structures, and characteristics of narrative. nEnglish majors must take this class for 5 units.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 183: Self-Impersonation: Autobiography, Memoir, Fictional Autobiography (ENGLISH 183E)

This course will examine the intersecting genres of fiction, autobiography, and memoir. Topics will include the literary construction of selfhood and its constituent categories; the role of language in the development of the self; the relational nature of the self (vis-à-vis the family, "society," nation, God); the cultural status of "individuality"; conceptions of childhood; and the role of individual testimony in our understanding of family, religious and cultural identity. In addition to short theoretical works, authors may include: Marguerite Duras; Elena Ferrante; Sam Shepard; Gertrude Stein; Karl Ove Knausgaard; Marcel Proust; Vladimir Nabokov; Primo Levi; Roland Barthes; and J. M. Coetzee.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II

COMPLIT 194: Independent Research

(Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
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