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1 - 10 of 27 results for: COMPLIT ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

COMPLIT 11Q: Shakespeare, Playing, Gender

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on several of the best and lesser known plays of Shakespeare, on theatrical and other kinds of playing, and on ambiguities of both gender and playing gender. Note: This course must be taken for a letter grade to be eligible for WAYS credit.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Parker, P. (PI)

COMPLIT 22Q: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (CHINA 22Q, HUMCORE 22Q, JAPAN 22Q)

Modern East Asia was almost continuously convulsed by war and revolution in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the everyday experience of modernity was structured more profoundly by the widening gulf between the country and the city, economically, politically, and culturally. This course examines literary and cinematic works from China and Japan that respond to and reflect on the city/country divide, framing it against issues of class, gender, national identity, and ethnicity. It also explores changing ideas about home/hometown, native soil, the folk, roots, migration, enlightenment, civilization, progress, modernization, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and sustainability. All materials are in English. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the East Asian track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study East Asian history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 33Q: Humanities Core: Middle East III -- Future (DLCL 33Q, HUMCORE 33Q)

How do we face the future? What resources do we have? Which power structures hold us back and which empower us? What are our identities here at college on the far Western edge of the Western world? In 1850s Lebabnon, Abu Faris Shidyaq faced all these same questions except for the last of course though he did face a version of even that question, one proper to a mid-19th c. Christian magazine editor. In HumCore Middle East III - Future, we engage with global claims about identity culture and politics. Ganzeer's graphic novel speaks to California as much as to Egypt; Ataturk's speeches are about power and identity just like Donald Trump's. Whether in Turkish novels or Arabic poetry, the people we engage in this course are looking to their pasts and futures, just like us. N.B. This is the third of three courses in the Middle Eastern track. These courses offer an unparalleled opportunity to study Middle Eastern history and culture, past and present. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to exploring how ideas have shaped our world and future.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 36A: Dangerous Ideas (ARTHIST 36, EALC 36, ENGLISH 71, ETHICSOC 36X, FRENCH 36, HISTORY 3D, MUSIC 36H, PHIL 36, POLISCI 70, SLAVIC 36)

Ideas matter. Concepts such as race, progress, and equality have inspired social movements, shaped political systems, and dramatically influenced the lives of individuals. Others, like gender identity, universal basic income, and historical memory play an important role in contemporary debates in the United States. All of these ideas are contested, and they have a real power to change lives, for better and for worse. In this one-unit class we will examine these dangerous ideas. Each week, a faculty member from a different department in the humanities and arts will explore a concept that has shaped human experience across time and space. Some weeks will have short reading assignments, but you are not required to purchase any materials.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Anderson, R. (PI)

COMPLIT 110: Introduction to Comparative Queer Literary Studies (COMPLIT 310, FEMGEN 110X, FEMGEN 310X)

Introduction to the comparative literary study of important gay, lesbian, queer, bisexual, and transgender writers and their changing social, political, and cultural contexts from the 1880s to today: Oscar Wilde, Rachilde, Radclyffe Hall, Djuna Barnes, James Baldwin, Jean Genet, Audre Lorde, Cherrie Moraga, Jeanette Winterson, Alison Bechdel and others, discussed in the context of 20th-century feminist and queer literary and social theories of gender and sexuality. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course 110 or 110X for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 123: The Novel and the World (DLCL 143)

Before the Digital Era: the European Design of the Novel. The course will trace the development of the modern literary genre par excellence through some of its great milestones from the 17th century to the present. Works by Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Queiròs, Mann, Roth, Woolf, Lampedusa and Rodoreda.Lazarillo de Tormes, Jane Austen: Pride and Prejudice, Flaubert: Madame Bovary, Dostoevsky: Crime and Punishment, Eça de Queirós: The City and the Mountains, Thomas Mann: Death in Venice, Joseph Roth: Radietskymarsh, Virginia Woolf: Mrs. Dalloway, Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, The Leopard, Mercé Rodoreda: The Time of the Doves.

Terms: Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Resina, J. (PI)

COMPLIT 127B: The Hebrew and Jewish Short Story (JEWISHST 147B)

Short stories from Israel, the US and Europe including works by Agnon, Kafka, Keret, Castel-Bloom, Kashua, Singer, Benjamin, Freud, biblical myths and more. The class will engage with questions related to the short story as a literary form and the history of the short story. Reading and discussion in English. Optional: special section with readings and discussions in Hebrew. Note: To be eligible for WAYS credit, you must take the course for a Letter Grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Shemtov, V. (PI)

COMPLIT 132: The Grandeur of Epic: Poetry, Narrative, and World from Homer to Evolutionary Biology (CLASSICS 130)

Explores the mystery and power of epic. This ancient word, which at its root means "what is spoken," first classified certain traditions of archaic Greek poetry, especially Homer's Iliad and Odyssey. It now appears everywhere from slang to contemporary scientific discourse. Though some might dismiss its proliferation as an accident of everyday speech, the course will take the phenomenon of "epic" seriously, asking what it is about this oldest of genres that continues to inspire our collective imagination. Readings will include works of epic as well as theoretical and philosophical works on narrative, religion, and science. We will read substantial selections from the Iliad, Hesiod's poems, the Hebrew Bible, the Gospels, Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, J.R.R. Tolkien's Silmarillion, and Ursula K. Le Guin's A Wizard of Earthsea.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 149: The Laboring of Diaspora & Border Literary Cultures (CSRE 149, ILAC 149)

Focus is given to emergent theories of culture and on comparative literary and cultural studies. How do we treat culture as a social force? How do we go about reading the presence of social contexts within cultural texts? How do ethno-racial writers re-imagine the nation as a site with many "cognitive maps" in which the nation-state is not congruent with cultural identity? How do diaspora and border narratives/texts strive for comparative theoretical scope while remaining rooted in specific local histories. Note: This course must be taken for a minimum of 3 units and a letter grade to be eligible for Ways credit
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

COMPLIT 172: A History of Nature Through Literature and Art

In light of impending ecological collapse and climate catastrophe, eco-critics assert the need to abandon the concept of Nature. As it has developed in European literature and art, Nature "is an arbitrary rhetorical construct, empty of independent, genuine existence behind or beyond the texts we create about it" (Morton 22) What, then, is Nature? Does Nature exist outside of the texts and artwork that claim to represent it? What concepts can we develop to take its place? In this course, we will assess the history of Nature through European literature and art from the sixteenth century to the present day. Of particular focus will be the history of landscape painting, the pastoral tradition in the Renaissance, Enlightenment debates on the state of nature, Romantic poetry and the writings of Thoreau, John Muir, and Rachel Carson. Reading literature and art from a diversity of historical moments and cultural contexts permits a critical reassessment of our own conceptions of Nature and those of contemporary political and economic discourses. This course aims to empower students to construct their own conceptions of Nature and bring literature, history, and art to bear on contemporary debates about the environment and climate change, gender and sexuality, government and power.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
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