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1 - 10 of 36 results for: CLASSICS ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CLASSICS 2G: Beginning Greek

Continuation of CLASSICS 1G. Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Dubit, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 2L: Beginning Latin

(Formerly CLASSLAT 2.) Vocabulary and syntax of the classical language. Prerequisite: CLASSICS 1L or equivalent placement.
Terms: Win | Units: 5
Instructors: Bark, B. (PI)

CLASSICS 12G: Intermediate Greek: Herodotus

Intensive reading of selections from the Histories, with review of morphology and syntax, aimed at developing familiarity with fundamentals of Greek prose style and appreciation for the artistry of the first fully-extant Greek historical writing. The rest of the Histories will be read in English translation. Each class meeting includes translation of prepared Greek texts, sight reading, discussion, and short lecture or report. Classics majors and minors must take course for letter grade. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Martin, R. (PI)

CLASSICS 12L: Intermediate Latin: Cicero and Catullus

In this class, you will practice with and reinforce the advanced vocabulary, forms, and syntax of classical Latin you have previously acquired. While the primary emphasis of this course is on developing fluency in reading Latin, you will have opportunities to discuss and research the biographical, political, and literary issues raised by the readings. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Macksoud, J. (PI)

CLASSICS 16N: Sappho: Erotic Poetess of Lesbos (FEMGEN 24N)

Preference to freshmen. Sappho's surviving fragments in English; traditions referring to or fantasizing about her disputed life. How her poetry and legend inspired women authors and male poets such as Swinburne, Baudelaire, and Pound. Paintings inspired by Sappho in ancient and modern times, and composers who put her poetry to music.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-Gender, WAY-CE, WAY-ED
Instructors: Peponi, A. (PI)

CLASSICS 21Q: Eight Great Archaeological Sites in Europe (ARCHLGY 21Q)

Preference to sophomores. Focus is on excavation, features and finds, arguments over interpretation, and the place of each site in understanding the archaeological history of Europe. Goal is to introduce the latest archaeological and anthropological thought, and raise key questions about ancient society. The archaeological perspective foregrounds interdisciplinary study: geophysics articulated with art history, source criticism with analytic modeling, statistics interpretation. A web site with resources about each site, including plans, photographs, video, and publications, is the basis for exploring.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II, Writing 2
Instructors: Shanks, M. (PI)

CLASSICS 47: Ancient Knowledge, New Frontiers: How the Greek Legacy Became Islamic Science (COMPLIT 107A, HUMCORE 121)

What contributions did Arabic and Islamic civilization make to the history of science? This course will read key moments in Greek and Islamic science and philosophy and ask questions about scientific method, philosophy, and religious belief. We will read Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Ibn Haytham, and Baha al-Din al-Amili, among others. What is the scientific method and is it universal across time and place? What is Islamic rationality? What is Greek rationality? Who commits to empiricism and who relies on inherited ideas? This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CLASSICS 56: Decolonizing the Western Canon: Introduction to Art and Architecture from Prehistory to Medieval (ARTHIST 1A)

Traditional Art History viewed the Renaissance as its pinnacle; it privileged linear perspective and lifelikeness and measured other traditions against this standard, neglecting art from the Near East, Egypt, the Middle Ages, or Islam. This course will disrupt this colonizing vision by conceptualizing artworks as "methexis" (participation, liveliness, or enactment) as opposed to mimesis (imitation or lifelikeness). We will study the development of the Western canon and its systematic eradication of difference through a renewed understanding of what an artwork is.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

CLASSICS 83: The Greeks (HISTORY 101)

250 years ago, for almost the first time in history, a few societies rejected kings who claimed to know what the gods wanted and began moving toward democracy. Only once before had this happened--in ancient Greece. This course asks how the Greeks did this, and what they can teach us today. It uses texts and archaeology to trace the material and military sides of the story as well as cultural developments, and looks at Greek slavery and misogyny as well as their achievements. Weekly participation in a discussion section is required.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI

CLASSICS 102G: Advanced Greek: Aeschylus

As the only extant tragedy from Greek antiquity that features characters who explicitly reflect on their black skin color, Aeschylus' Suppliant Women destabilizes a monolithic definition of alterity. In this tragedy, fifty black Egyptian Greek women transform from frightened maidens into astute performers who force their audience to contend with their perceived differences. While reading this ancient Greek tragedy, students will increase their knowledge of Greek grammar and syntax, become familiar with essential aspects of Greek tragedy, and explore Aeschylus' place within the tragic tradition. Classics majors and minors may repeat for credit with advance approval from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: Language | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Derbew, S. (PI)
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