2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020 2020-2021
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 
  COVID-19 Scheduling Updates!
See Stanford's HealthAlerts website for latest updates concerning COVID-19 and academic policies.

1 - 10 of 21 results for: CHPR ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHPR 130: Human Nutrition (HUMBIO 130)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HUMBIO 130. CHPR master's students must enroll in CHRP 130.) The study of food, and the nutrients and substances therein. Their action, interaction, and balance in relation to health and disease. Emphasis is on the biological, chemical, and physiological processes by which humans ingest, digest, absorb, transport, utilize, and excrete food. Dietary composition and individual choices are discussed in relationship to the food supply, and to population and cultural, race, ethnic, religious, and social economic diversity. The relationships between nutrition and disease; ethnic diets; vegetarianism; nutritional deficiencies; nutritional supplementation; phytochemicals. CHPR master's students must enroll for a letter grade. Enrollment limited to students with sophomore academic standing or above. Prerequisites: Human Biology Core or Biology Foundations or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA
Instructors: Gardner, C. (PI)

CHPR 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Baiocchi, M. (PI)

CHPR 200: SPRC/GMD Research Seminar

Focus is on research on prevention of chronic disease and related topics. Guest speakers present material. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

CHPR 202: R Fundamentals for Health Research (EPI 202)

This introductory course is a practicum in which students will learn the basics of R and use the programming language to analyze health datasets by application of classical statistical methods. A familiarity with basic descriptive and inferential statistics is required. It is assumed that students will have no (or very little) prior experience with R. Class sessions will include some lecture content and hands-on coding by each student on their own computers. Students will practice using R with open-source and simulated datasets. The primary goal of the course is to equip students with a basic and fundamental understanding of R's capabilities, experience using R with practice datasets, and the ability to extend their facility with R as their needs dictate. Students enrolled for 2 units will have additional weekly practice problems assigned. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR masters students, who must take the course for a letter grade.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1-2
Instructors: Park, L. (PI)

CHPR 232: Social and Structural Determinants of Health: Achieving Health Equity

This course examines the theoretical basis and societal context of the social determinants of health, racial-ethnic health disparities, and health equity. Each session focuses on a social determinant of health addressed by Michael Marmot, including the social gradient, stress, racism, early life, social exclusion, work, unemployment, social support, addiction, food and transportation. Students will be encouraged to think beyond the individual-level to consider multi-level and policy-level interventions to promote health equity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit (up to 99 units total)

CHPR 233: Contemplative Science: The Power of the Pause for Resilience, Relationships, and Resolve

Advances in contemplative science reveal ways of caring for ourselves and others that promote health and well-being for individuals and communities. Study of diverse, evidence-based contemplative practices identifies why, how, and when specific practices are beneficial for health, well-being, focus, learning, self-compassion, positive emotions, empathy, communication, compassionate action, and burnout prevention. This course progresses through: 1) awareness-based self-care; 2) compassion-based interpersonal connections; and 3) purpose-based meaningful work and service. A unifying course framework facilitates insights regarding healthy processes for fulfilling fundamental human needs for safety/calm/peace, connection/compassion/love, and satisfaction/competence/joy. While the course focuses on factors that cultivate and sustain health, obstructions and impediments such as oppression and trauma are discussed. The course combines investigation of research with direct experience in an imme more »
Advances in contemplative science reveal ways of caring for ourselves and others that promote health and well-being for individuals and communities. Study of diverse, evidence-based contemplative practices identifies why, how, and when specific practices are beneficial for health, well-being, focus, learning, self-compassion, positive emotions, empathy, communication, compassionate action, and burnout prevention. This course progresses through: 1) awareness-based self-care; 2) compassion-based interpersonal connections; and 3) purpose-based meaningful work and service. A unifying course framework facilitates insights regarding healthy processes for fulfilling fundamental human needs for safety/calm/peace, connection/compassion/love, and satisfaction/competence/joy. While the course focuses on factors that cultivate and sustain health, obstructions and impediments such as oppression and trauma are discussed. The course combines investigation of research with direct experience in an immersive, transformative learning retreat format rooted in the rhythm of contemplative ways of being, discovery, and expression. Multimodal activities include embodiment practices, meditation, breathwork, journaling, dyad listening, reflections on poetry and non-fiction, research critiques, iterative behavioral action plans, and creation of multimedia narratives. These activities provide a foundation for a lifetime of whole-person integrated ways of living, exploring, thinking, and serving. The course equips students with a body of knowledge and skills to flourish personally and professionally, develop innovative solutions to complex problems, and sustain research and service dedicated to improving health and well-being for everyone. Offered for 1-3 units via 3 weekend retreats (1-unit each) taught on the 2nd, 5th and 8th weekends of the quarter. The curriculum builds upon previous retreat topics: #1 Resilience, #2 Relationships, #3 Resolve. Register for your preferred number of units. (Retreat #1 = 1-unit; Retreats #1 + #2 = 2-units; or Retreats #1 + #2 + #3 = 3 units).
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 6 units total)
Instructors: Rich, T. (PI)

CHPR 238: Social Media, Health, and Well-Being

Focus is on how social media affects well-being, how and why information spreads, effects of social media on young people and other vulnerable populations, and how social media can be used to improve health behaviors and well-being. The synchronous class sessions on Zoom consist of brief lectures, guest speakers, and class discussions. Assignments will include reading, submitting written reflections, and participating in class discussions. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR masters students, who must enroll for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 1

CHPR 247: Methods in Community Assessment, Evaluation, and Research (MED 147, MED 247)

Development of pragmatic skills for design, implementation, and analysis of structured interviews, focus groups, survey questionnaires, and field observations. Topics include: principles of community-based participatory research, including importance of dissemination; strengths and limitations of different study designs; validity and reliability; construction of interview and focus group questions; techniques for moderating focus groups; content analysis of qualitative data; survey questionnaire design; and interpretation of commonly-used statistical analyses.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Kiernan, M. (PI)

CHPR 266: Advanced Statistical Methods for Observational Studies (EDUC 260B, EPI 292, STATS 266)

Design principles and statistical methods for observational studies. Topics include: matching methods, sensitivity analysis, and instrumental variables. 3 unit registration requires a small project and presentation. Computing is in R. Pre-requisites: EPI 261 and 262 or STATS 209 ( EPI 239), or equivalent. See http://rogosateaching.com/somgen290/
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-3

CHPR 270: Prevention Across Surgical and Other Medical Disciplines

This course is coordinated seminar series that presents evidence-based health promotion and disease prevention guidelines by clinical and translational research and population health science faculty of clinical departments other than Medicine (the focus of CHPR 260) of the Stanford School of Medicine, including; Anesthesiology & Perioperative, & Pain Medicine, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dermatology, Emergency Medicine, Neurology & Neurological Sciences, Neurosurgery, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Ophthalmology, Orthopaedic Surgery, Otolaryngology, Pathology, Pediatrics, Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Radiation Oncology, Radiology, Surgery and Urology, CHPR master's program students must enroll for a letter grade and priority for enrollment will be given to current CHPR students. Prerequisites: CHPR 201 or HUMBIO 126/ CHPR 226 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
teaching presence
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints