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1 - 10 of 26 results for: CHPR

CHPR 199: Undergraduate Research

Students undertake investigations sponsored by individual faculty members. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-18 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Baiocchi, M. (PI)

CHPR 200: SPRC/GMD Research Seminar

Focus is on research on prevention of chronic disease and related topics. Guest speakers present material. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Satisfactory/No Credit

CHPR 201: Introduction to Science of Healthy Living

This introduction to the science of healthy living (primarily U.S.) highlights preventable causes of mortality, i.e. modifiable risk factors, national lifestyle recommendations and behavioral change principles for reducing chronic disease risk. A life course perspective is presented as a trajectory from fetal/neonatal to childhood and adolescence to young, middle-ages and older adults, with recognition of the importance of social determinants of health. Sex & gender differences are also presented. Unless otherwise noted, all lectures are presented by Course Director, Marcia Stefanick, Ph.D. Priority for enrollment given to CHPR masters students, who must take the course for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 202: INTRODUCTION TO R

This introductory course is a practicum in which students will learn the basics of R and use the programming language to analyze health datasets by application of classical statistical methods. A familiarity with basic descriptive and inferential statistics is required. It is assumed that students will have no (or very little) prior experience with R. Class sessions will include some lecture content and hands-on coding by each student on their own computers. Students will practice using R with open-source and simulated datasets. The primary goal of the course is to equip students with a basic and fundamental understanding of R's capabilities, experience using R with practice datasets, and the ability to extend their facility with R as their needs dictate.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 205: Understanding Evidence-Based Medicine: Hands-on experience

How can one practice Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) and make evidence-based decisions for clinical practice and policy making? In this course we will teach the principles of EBM using examples from pivotal papers published in recent scientific literature in major journals addressing important clinical questions on diverse medical topics. We will probe a wide range of types of studies, targeted therapeutic or preventive interventions, and studies outcomes, including randomized controlled trials, observational studies, epidemiologic surveillance studies, systemic reviews, meta-analyses, mate-analyses of individual patient data, studies on the evaluation of diagnostic test and prognostic models, economic analyses studies, and guidelines. MD studies enroll for +/-. GR students enroll for Letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 220: Responsible Conduct of Research in the Community

This course will engage CHPR students pursuing community-based participatory research in discussions regarding ethical issues to prepare them for their CHPR internship and thesis. Discussions will address specifics of conducting research at Stanford as well as issues that may arise in the community at large. Course limited to current CHPR master's students, who must enroll for a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 226: Promoting Health Over the Life Course: the Science of Healthy Living (HUMBIO 126)

(HUMBIO students must enroll in HumBio 126. CHPR students must enroll in CHPR 226 for a letter grade.) Disease prevention and health promotion topics pertinent at different stages of the life span emphasizing healthy lifestyle and reducing risk factors in both individuals and communities. Focus is on the application of behavioral science to risk reduction strategies, and the importance of health promotion as a social and economic imperative. Public and community health are emphasized. Topics include: epidemiology of chronic diseases; social determinants of health, behavior change; physical activity, nutrition, obesity and stress reduction; children, young adult, mid-life and aging health issues; health care delivery and public health system; workplace wellness; and other additional issues. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor. Students enrolled in CHPR 226 must complete additional assignments appropriate for its Masters level listing. Undergraduate prerequisite: Human Biology Core or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CHPR 228: Theoretical Foundations and Design of Behavioral Intervention Trials

Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other pra more »
Focuses on the knowledge and skills, respect and thoughtful practice of designing health promotion interventions that are relevant, theoretically-informed, have broad impacts, and can endure. Provides an in-depth review of intervention approaches for health promotion and disease prevention and covers the leading theories of behavior change. Follows an integrative model to demonstrate similarities and differences between the theoretical approaches, seeking what is useful and worthwhile in each theoretical model rather than looking primarily for what is most easily criticized. Practical in nature with emphasis on the specifics of needs assessments and intervention development and delivery and how these may vary across community settings, with diverse populations, addressing different behaviors, and leveraging traditional and emerging delivery channels. Explores intervention creation, delivery, effectiveness, and sustainability to identify and better understand the resources and other practical considerations necessary to produce, deliver, monitor, and disseminate an intervention with demonstrated effectiveness. Examples drawn from across the behavioral spectrum and include tobacco control, physical activity, healthy diet, stress and distress, as well as consideration of the complexities of extending interventions to target multiple risk behaviors. Students develop a foundational understanding of behavior change theory, rigorous research methods, and creative design strategies to advance the health of individuals and communities. Students taking 2 units only will complete all 4 homework assignments, attend 8 of 10 class sessions, and complete an abbreviated final abstract plus figures/tables instead of a final paper. The grading, in this instance, will be the medical school option of credit/no credit. CHPR master's students must enroll for 3 units and a letter grade.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-3 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 231: Diet and Gene Expression

This course provides an introduction to epigenetics, the study of how lifestyle factors can change gene activity without actually modifying the underlying DNA. With that basic foundation in place, students will then discover how food in particular is a powerful signal to our genes that can have a positive impact on our metabolism, longevity, and mental well-being. Along the way, we will specifically explore basic concepts in nutrigenomics, the study of how gene expression can be modified by certain nutrients and bioactive food compounds.
Terms: Win | Units: 1 | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)

CHPR 232: Social Determinants of Health

This course examines the theoretical basis and societal context of the social determinants of health, racial-ethnic health disparities, and health equity. Each session focuses on a social determinant of health addressed by Michael Marmot, including the social gradient, stress, racism, early life, social exclusion, work, unemployment, social support, addiction, food and transportation. Students will be encouraged to think beyond the individual-level to consider multi-level and policy-level interventions to promote health equity.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Medical Option (Med-Ltr-CR/NC)
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