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1 - 10 of 21 results for: CHINA ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHINA 24: Humanities Core: How to be Modern in East Asia (COMPLIT 44, HUMCORE 133, JAPAN 24, KOREA 24)

Modern East Asia was almost continuously convulsed by war and revolution in the 19th and 20th centuries. But the everyday experience of modernity was structured more profoundly by the widening gulf between the country and the city, economically, politically, and culturally. This course examines literary and cinematic works from China and Japan that respond to and reflect on the city/country divide, framing it against issues of class, gender, national identity, and ethnicity. It also explores changing ideas about home/hometown, native soil, the folk, roots, migration, enlightenment, civilization, progress, modernization, nationalism, cosmopolitanism, and sustainability. All materials are in English. This course is part of the Humanities Core: https://humanitiescore.stanford.edu/
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II

CHINA 107: Beginning Classical Chinese, Third Quarter (CHINA 207)

Goal is reading knowledge of classical Chinese. Basic grammar and commonly used vocabulary. Students with no background in classical Chinese who are taking 127/207 to satisfy Chinese major requirements must begin with 125/205. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 126/206 or equivalent.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINA 159A: Maoism and the Chinese Communist Party (CHINA 259A)

One of the most significant moments in Chinese history during the twentieth century was the Chinese Communist Party's victory on the mainland in 1949. Nevertheless, it remains a puzzle to many people how the CCP unified China and brought an entirely new ideology to such a large population. This course seeks to answer such intensely debated questions through analyzing the CCP's origin and its development of Marxism and Leninism in China, CCP¿s rural revolution and land reform, thought reform among CCP members and intellectuals, and most importantly, Mao Zedong¿s writings. This course offers different or even contrasting perspectives on the Chinese Communist Revolution, such as intellectuals within and outside the Party, foreign journalists in China, as well as highest-level CCP leaders.nnAll the readings of this course are primary sources produced during Marxist revolutions within and outside China. Part I introduces some of the most influential communist "creed" written by Karl Marx, F more »
One of the most significant moments in Chinese history during the twentieth century was the Chinese Communist Party's victory on the mainland in 1949. Nevertheless, it remains a puzzle to many people how the CCP unified China and brought an entirely new ideology to such a large population. This course seeks to answer such intensely debated questions through analyzing the CCP's origin and its development of Marxism and Leninism in China, CCP¿s rural revolution and land reform, thought reform among CCP members and intellectuals, and most importantly, Mao Zedong¿s writings. This course offers different or even contrasting perspectives on the Chinese Communist Revolution, such as intellectuals within and outside the Party, foreign journalists in China, as well as highest-level CCP leaders.nnAll the readings of this course are primary sources produced during Marxist revolutions within and outside China. Part I introduces some of the most influential communist "creed" written by Karl Marx, Frederick Engels, and Vladimir Lenin. While there is little consensus among scholars to what degree we can call the Chinese communist revolution a Marxist revolution or a Leninist revolution, Marx's and Lenin's writings remain the guiding principles to many Chinese communist intellectuals. In Part II, Edgar Snow's most influential book Red Star Over China offers the most crucial first-hand perspective on the everyday life of key CCP leaders and the history of the early CCP. It is true that Snow¿s book is a highly romanticized version of the CCP's history, yet it offers the most vivid description of CCP's rural base in Northwest China and details on some of the most important historical events, such as the Long March. This book also provides valuable information on the ordinary people living in the Communist base. In Part III, we will focus entirely on Mao's writings and his interaction with other intellectuals from the May-Fourth period to the 1950s. These writings vividly show Mao's unique understanding of China's peasant problem, inner-Party struggles, and his vision about a new China. In Part IV, through the eyes of Li Zhisui, Mao's private doctor, we will examine how Mao's decisions changed the fate of China from 1949 to Mao's death in 1976. Parts I to IV build the intellectual and historical foundation for students of Chinese Studies to understand and interpret Mao's writings and thoughts."
Terms: Spr | Units: 4
Instructors: Jiao, Y. (PI)

CHINA 161: Soldiers and Bandits in Chinese Culture (CHINA 261)

Social roles and literary images of two groups on the margins of traditional Chinese society; historical and comparative perspectives.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5
Instructors: Zhou, Y. (PI)

CHINA 176: Emergence of Chinese Civilization from Caves to Palaces (ARCHLGY 111, CHINA 276)

Introduces processes of cultural evolution from the Paleolithic to the Three Dynasties in China. By examining archaeological remains, ancient inscriptions, and traditional texts, four major topics will be discussed: origins of modern humans, beginnings of agriculture, development of social stratification, and emergence of states and urbanism.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-SI

CHINA 191: The Structure of Modern Chinese (CHINA 291)

Introduce to students the basic grammar of Standard Modern Chinese in comparison to English. Students learn about the logic of the Chinese in communicating ideas and events without grammatical markers like plurality, definiteness, tense, subject/object, etc, as well as common uses of verbs and adjectives that are totally different from those in English. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 3 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci
Instructors: Sun, C. (PI)

CHINA 198C: Senior Research (Capstone Essay)

EALC students writing a Senior Capstone Essay who wish to do research with their adviser may enroll in this course for 1 unit, for one quarter. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable 5 times (up to 5 units total)

CHINA 198H: Senior Research (Honors Thesis)

EALC seniors or juniors pursuing honors research should sign up for this course under their faculty adviser for research credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CHINA 199: Individual Reading in Chinese

Asian Language majors only. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 103 or consent of instructor. Units by arrangement.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

CHINA 200: Directed Reading in Chinese

Independent studies under the direction of a faculty member for which academic credit may properly be allowed. Research will require in-person access to archival materials in Hoover Institution, Stanford's East Asia Library, and/or Branner Map Collections. For EALC students; non-EALC students, should seek instructor permission before enrolling in section.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit
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