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1 - 10 of 20 results for: CHINA ; Currently searching autumn courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CHINA 20: Humanities Core: Dao, Virtue, and Nature -- Foundations of East Asian Thought (HUMCORE 20, JAPAN 20, KOREA 20)

This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and more »
This course explores the values and questions posed in the formative period of East Asian civilizations. Notions of a Dao ("Way") are common to Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism, but those systems of thought have radically different ideas about what that Dao is and how it might be realized in society and an individual's life. These systems of thought appeared first in China, and eventually spread to Korea and Japan. Each culture developed its own ways of reconciling the competing systems, but in each case the comprehensive structure of values and human ideals differs significantly from those that appeared elsewhere in the ancient world. The course examines East Asian ideas about self-cultivation, harmonious society, rulership, and the relation between human and nature with a view toward expanding our understanding of these issues in human history, and highlighting their legacies in Asian civilizations today. The course features selective readings in classics of Confucian, Daoist, and Buddhist texts that present the foundational tenets of Asian thought. N. B. This is the first of three courses in the Humanities Core, East Asian track. These courses show how history and ideas shape our world and future. Take all three to experience a year-long intellectual community dedicated to the life of the mind.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-ER
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

CHINA 105: Beginning Classical Chinese, First Quarter (CHINA 205)

The goal is develop students' reading knowledge of classical Chinese, including basic grammar and commonly used vocabulary. Students will also learn concepts and ideas fundamental in Chinese culture involving family, human relationships, governance, learning, life/death, philosophy, etc. through reading canonical classical Chinese texts. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 23 or equivalent.
Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Wu, G. (PI)

CHINA 111: Literature in 20th-Century China (CHINA 211)

(Graduate students register for 211.) How modern Chinese culture evolved from tradition to modernity; the century-long drive to build a modern nation state and to carry out social movements and political reforms. How the individual developed modern notions of love, affection, beauty, and moral relations with community and family. Sources include fiction and film clips. WIM course.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Wang, B. (PI)

CHINA 155A: Health, Politics, and Culture of Modern China (ANTHRO 148, ANTHRO 248, CHINA 255A)

One of the most generative regions for medical anthropology inquiry in recent years has been Asia. This seminar is designed to introduce upper division undergraduates and graduate students to the methodological hurdles, representational challenges, and intellectual rewards of investigating the intersections of health, politics, and culture in contemporary China.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-SocSci, WAY-ED, WAY-SI
Instructors: Kohrman, M. (PI)

CHINA 174: New Directions in the Study of Poetry and Literati Culture (CHINA 274)

Inquiry into new approaches and interpretations of the poetic tradition in China in the context of cultural history. Readings in recent scholarship and criticism that situate poetry in print history, manuscript culture, gender studies, social history, etc. Readings in English. Reading knowledge of Chinese desirable but not required.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-4 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Egan, R. (PI)

CHINA 198C: Senior Research (Capstone Essay)

EALC students writing a Senior Capstone Essay who wish to do research with their adviser may enroll in this course for 1 unit, for one quarter. May be repeat for credit
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit

CHINA 198H: Senior Research (Honors Thesis)

EALC seniors or juniors pursuing honors research should sign up for this course under their faculty adviser for research credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-5 | Repeatable for credit

CHINA 199: Individual Reading in Chinese

Asian Language majors only. Prerequisite: CHINLANG 103 or consent of instructor. Units by arrangement.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-4 | Repeatable for credit

CHINA 200: Directed Reading in Chinese

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-12 | Repeatable for credit

CHINA 205: Beginning Classical Chinese, First Quarter (CHINA 105)

Terms: Aut | Units: 2-5
Instructors: Wu, G. (PI)
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