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1 - 10 of 110 results for: CEE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 32G: Architecture Since 1900 (ARTHIST 142)

Art 142 is an introduction to the history of architecture since 1900 and how it has shaped and been shaped by its cultural contexts. The class also investigates the essential relationship between built form and theory during this period.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32W: Making Meaning: A Purposeful Life in Design

As designers, how do we lead a life with meaning? What is a fuulfilling life in design and how do we develop personal and professional practices that support this aim? This experiential course will explore how to nourish a purposeful life amidst a culture that can value productivity over presence in the field, identifying "busyness" as a marker of personal worth. How do we bring depth to not only the design process but our individual and collective lives as well? Investigations will include: exploring personal passions, discovering meaningful work in design, understanding work/life/play balance, practicing self-reflection, integrating wellness, cultivating community, and practicing design with integrity. Our time in class will be enjoyed sharing meals, discourse, play, and reflections with both the class cohort and designers that lead lives or purpose and meaning.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 101A: Mechanics of Materials

Introduction to beam and column theory. Normal stress and strain in beams under various loading conditions; shear stress and shear flow; deflections of determinate and indeterminate beams; analysis of column buckling; structural loads in design; strength and serviceability criteria. Lab experiments. Prerequisites: ENGR 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Linder, C. (PI)

CEE 101B: Mechanics of Fluids

Physical properties of fluids and their effect on flow behavior; equations of motion for incompressible ideal flow, including the special case of hydrostatics; continuity, energy, and momentum principles; control volume analysis; laminar and turbulent flows; internal and external flows in specific engineering applications including pipes and open channels; elements of boundary-layer theory. Prerequisites: E14, Physics 41, Math 51, or CME 100.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci
Instructors: Koseff, J. (PI)

CEE 102A: Legal / Ethical Principles in Design, Construction, Project Delivery

Introduction to the key legal principles affecting design, construction and the delivery of infrastructure projects. The course begins with an introduction to the structure of law, including principles of contract, negligence, professional responsibility, intellectual property, land use and environmental law, then draws on these concepts to examine current and developing means of project delivery. Limited class size. Enrollment preference given to undergraduates majoring in CE and EnvSE. Undergraduates wishing to have CEE 102A count as their Technology in Society (TiS) class must take it for a letter grade.
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Ashcraft, H. (PI)

CEE 107R: E^3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 207R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! Students will also meet several times during the quarter prior to the spring break portion of the course. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activitie more »
Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! Students will also meet several times during the quarter prior to the spring break portion of the course. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400). Lodging and food will be provided during the course. Students must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses or their equivalent is required: CEE 107A/207A/ Earthsys 103, CEE 107S/ CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course details are available at the website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 3
Instructors: Gragg, D. (PI)

CEE 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 214, MED 114, MED 214, PSYC 114)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. We will see a fusion of technologies and research that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres. As Industry 4.0 and the next revolution is transforming humanity, this course explores the development and application of key emerging technologies in society: AI/ML; Additive Manufacturing and Advanced Robotics; Smart Cities and Urban Mobility; Advanced Life Sciences; Blockchain; Telecommunications with 5G; and Data Privacy, Ethics, and Policy.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

CEE 118Y: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Y, ESS 118Y, ESS 218Y, GEOLSCI 118Y, GEOLSCI 218Y, GEOPHYS 118Y, GEOPHYS 218Y, POLISCI 218Y, PUBLPOL 118Y, PUBLPOL 218Y)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)
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