2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019
Browse
by subject...
    Schedule
view...
 

1 - 10 of 109 results for: CEE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 31: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to Architectural Design and CEE majors; others by consent of instructor. Drawing architecture to probe the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 32D: Construction: The Writing of Architecture

This seminar focuses on the construction of architectural writing. The class will analyze this idea through four topics: formal analysis, manifesto, translation, and preservation. The seminar is divided into two-week modules with each of these four concepts functioning as organizing principles. nnThe first week of each module will involve familiarizing the seminar with both the terms and rhetorical tactics of the given theme by reading and analyzing specific texts and completing a short written analysis (1-2 pages). The second week will expand upon this foundation and involve further analysis in addition to each student writing a short paper (3-4 pages) drawing on the examples discussed and their own experiences in the discipline. The goal of the seminar is for each student to be able to analyze how an architectural writing is constructed and to develop his/her skills in the construction of his/her own writing.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32W: Making Meaning: A Purposeful Life in Design

As designers, how do we lead a life with meaning? What is a fuulfilling life in design and how do we develop personal and professional practices that support this aim? This experiential course will explore how to nourish a purposeful life amidst a culture that can value productivity over presence in the field, identifying "busyness" as a marker of personal worth. How do we bring depth to not only the design process but our individual and collective lives as well? Investigations will include: exploring personal passions, discovering meaningful work in design, understanding work/life/play balance, practicing self-reflection, integrating wellness, cultivating community, and practicing design with integrity. Our time in class will be enjoyed sharing meals, discourse, play, and reflections with both the class cohort and designers that lead lives or purpose and meaning.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 64: Air Pollution and Global Warming: History, Science, and Solutions (CEE 263D)

Survey of Survey of air pollution and global warming and their renewable energy solutions. Topics: evolution of the Earth's atmosphere, history of discovery of chemicals in the air, bases and particles in urban smog, visibility, indoor air pollution, acid rain, stratospheric and Antarctic ozone loss, the historic climate record, causes and effects of global warming, impacts of energy systems on pollution and climate, renewable energy solutions to air pollution and global warming. UG Reqs: GER: DBNatSci
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Jacobson, M. (PI)

CEE 70: Environmental Science and Technology (ENGR 90)

Introduction to environmental quality and the technical background necessary for understanding environmental issues, controlling environmental degradation, and preserving air and water quality. Material balance concepts for tracking substances in the environmental and engineering systems.
Terms: Win, Sum | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopperud, R. (PI)

CEE 101A: Mechanics of Materials

Introduction to beam and column theory. Normal stress and strain in beams under various loading conditions; shear stress and shear flow; deflections of determinate and indeterminate beams; analysis of column buckling; structural loads in design; strength and serviceability criteria. Lab experiments. Prerequisites: ENGR 14.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Linder, C. (PI)

CEE 102: Legal Principles in Design, Construction, and Project Delivery

Introduction to the key legal principles affecting design, construction and the delivery of infrastructure projects. The course begins with an introduction to the structure of law, including principles of contract, negligence, professional responsibility, intellectual property, land use and environmental law, then draws on these concepts to examine current and developing means of project delivery.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Ashcraft, H. (PI)

CEE 107R: E^3: Extreme Energy Efficiency (CEE 207R)

Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! Students will also meet several times during the quarter prior to the spring break portion of the course. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activitie more »
Be part of a unique and intense six day course about extreme energy efficiency taking place during Spring Break at Rocky Mountain Institute's Innovation Center in Basalt, Colorado! Students will also meet several times during the quarter prior to the spring break portion of the course. E^3 will focus on efficiency techniques' design, performance, choice, evolution, integration, barrier-busting, profitable business-led implementation, and implications for energy supply, competitive success, environment, development, security, etc. Examples will span very diverse sectors, applications, issues, and disciplines, with each day covering a different energy theme: buildings, transportation, industry, and implementation and implications, including renewable energy synergy and integration. Solid technical grounding and acquaintance with basic economics and business concepts will both be helpful. Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI) will design a series of lectures, exercises, and interactive activities synthesizing integrative design principles. Students will be introduced to Factor 10 Engineering, the approach for optimizing the whole system for multiple benefits. Students will work closely and interactively with RMI staff including Amory Lovins, cofounder and Chief Scientist of Rocky Mountain Institute (RMI). Exercises will illuminate challenges RMI has faced and solutions it has created in real-world design. Students will explore clean-sheet solutions that meet end-use demands and optimize whole-system resource efficiency, often with expanding rather than diminishing returns to investments, i.e. making big savings cheaper than small ones. Students will meet as a class once during winter quarter to discuss preparation and spring break logistics. Students must pay for their own travel to and from Basalt, CO (~$400). Lodging and food will be provided during the course. Students must apply - instructor approval required. All backgrounds and disciplines, both undergraduate and graduate, are welcome to apply. Prerequisite - completion of one of the following courses or their equivalent is required: CEE 107A/207A/ Earthsys 103, CEE 107S/ CEE 207S, CEE 176A, CEE 176B. Contact Diana Ginnebaugh at moongdes@stanford.edu for an application. Course details are available at the website: https://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207r/
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 120B: Building Information Modeling Workshop (CEE 220B)

This course builds upon the Building Information Model concepts introduced in 120A/220A and illustrates how BIM modeling tools are used to design, analyze, and model building systems including structural, mechanical, electrical, plumbing and fire protection. Course covers the physical principles, design criteria, and design strategies for each system and explores processes and tools for modeling those systems and analyzing their performance.nTopics include: building envelopes, access systems, structural systems modeling and analysis, mechanical / HVAC systems, plumbing and fire protection systems, electrical systems, and systems integration/coordination.
Terms: Win | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 120S: Building Information Modeling Special Study (CEE 220S)

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)
Filter Results:
term offered
updating results...
number of units
updating results...
time offered
updating results...
days
updating results...
UG Requirements (GERs)
updating results...
component
updating results...
career
updating results...
© Stanford University | Terms of Use | Copyright Complaints