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1 - 10 of 110 results for: CEE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major, and undeclared Fr/Sophs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CEE 6: Physics of Cities (URBANST 109)

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32H: Responsive Structures (CEE 132H)

This Design Build seminar investigates the use of metal as a structural, spatial and organizational medium. We will examine the physical properties of post-formable plywood, and develop a structural system and design which respond to site and programmatic conditions. The process includes model building, prototyping, development of joinery, and culminates in the full scale installation of the developed design on campus. This course may be repeated for credit (up to three times). Class meeting days/times are as follows:n1st session : April 4, 10am - 6pmn2nd session : April 25th, 10am - 6pm n3rd session: May 5 , 6pm-9pm (Jun will not attend) nFinal Build dates: nMay 16 10am-eveningnMay 17th. 10am- 6:30 pm
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 32Q: Place: Making Space Now

This seminar argues that architeccts are ultimately "placemakers," and questions what that means in the contemporary world. Part I investigates the meaning of the word "place." Additional background for understanding contemporary place making will include a critique of the history of modern place-making through an examination of modern form. Part II examines two traditional notions of place by scale: from "home" to "the city." What elements give these conceptions of space a sense of place? To answer this question, themes such as memory, mapping, and boundary, among others, will be investigated. part III presents challenges to the traditional notions of place discussed in Part II. Topics addressed include: What does it mean to be "out of place"? What sense of place does a nomad have, and how is this represented? What are the "non-places" and how can architects design for these spaces? Part IV addresses the need to re-conceptualize contemporary space. The role of digital and cyber techno more »
This seminar argues that architeccts are ultimately "placemakers," and questions what that means in the contemporary world. Part I investigates the meaning of the word "place." Additional background for understanding contemporary place making will include a critique of the history of modern place-making through an examination of modern form. Part II examines two traditional notions of place by scale: from "home" to "the city." What elements give these conceptions of space a sense of place? To answer this question, themes such as memory, mapping, and boundary, among others, will be investigated. part III presents challenges to the traditional notions of place discussed in Part II. Topics addressed include: What does it mean to be "out of place"? What sense of place does a nomad have, and how is this represented? What are the "non-places" and how can architects design for these spaces? Part IV addresses the need to re-conceptualize contemporary space. The role of digital and cyber technologies, the construction of locality in a global world, and the in-between places that result from a world in flux are topics discussed in this section of the seminar. nLearning goals: Specific goals include clsoe reading of texts, understanding of philosophical thinking and writing, argument under uncertainty, and developed concepts of place, space and architecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-A-II
Instructors: Beischer, T. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

This seminar is a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The four course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates TBD. The meeting times are 4:30 PM -5:30 PM for the seminar and 6:30 - 7:45 for the lecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 40: Approaching Palau: Preparation and Research Ideation and Development (ESS 40)

This class is a seminar designed to prepare students participating in the 2019 Palau Seminar for possible research activities. Enrollment by approval of the instructors.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1

CEE 102W: Technical and Professional Communication (ENGR 102W)

Effective communication skills will help you advance quickly. Learn the best technical and professional techniques in writing and speaking. Group workshops and individual conferences with instructors. Designed for undergraduates going into industry. Allowed to fulfill WIM for Atmosphere/Energy and Environmental Systems Engineering majors only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3
Instructors: Harrison, K. (PI)

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, assignments, and two off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each fall (see syllabus for updated list), but may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose two field trips from approximately 8 that are offered. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter ¿ students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

CEE 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 214)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. We will see a fusion of technologies and research that is blurring the lines between the physical, digital, and biological spheres. As Industry 4.0 and the next revolution is transforming humanity, this course explores the development and application of key emerging technologies in society: AI/ML; Additive Manufacturing and Advanced Robotics; Smart Cities and Urban Mobility; Advanced Life Sciences; Blockchain; Telecommunications with 5G; and Data Privacy, Ethics, and Policy.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
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