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1 - 10 of 108 results for: CEE

CEE 1: Introduction to Environmental Systems Engineering

Field trips visiting environmental systems installations in Northern California, including coastal, freshwater, and urban infrastructure. Requirements: Several campus meetings, and field trips. Enrollment limited; priority given to undergraduates who have declared Environmental Systems Engineering major.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

CEE 6: Physics of Cities

An introduction to the modern study of complex systems with cities as an organizing focus. Topics will include: cities as interacting systems; cities as networks; flows of resources and information through cities; principles of organization, self-organization, and complexity; how the properties of cities scale with size; and human movement patterns. No particular scientific background is required, but comfort with basic mathematics will be assumed. Prerequisites: MATH 19 and 20, or the equivalent
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 32V: Architectural Design Lecture Series Course

This seminar is a companion to the Spring Architecture and Landscape Architecture Lecture Series. Students will converse with lecturers before the lectures, attend the lecture, and prepare short documents (written, graphic, exploratory) for two of the lectures. The four course meeting dates will correspond with the lecture dates TBD. The meeting times are 4:30 PM -5:30 PM for the seminar and 6:30 - 7:45 for the lecture.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 33B: Japanese Modern Architecture

This seminar will examine Japanese architecture and theory since 1900. Through a combination of case studies, readings, and chronological overview, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the aesthetic, expression of construction, structural dynamics, material choices, and philosophical viewpoints that impact Japanese modern and contemporary architectural design. Through lectures, class discussions, a series of weekly writing assignments, and a longer paper and presentation, students will develop the tools to analyze and understand Japanese design of today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Wood, E. (PI)

CEE 33C: Housing Visions

This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These is more »
This course provides an introduction to American Housing practices, spanning from the Industrial Age to the present. Students will examine a range of projects that have aspired to a range of social, economic and/or environmental visions. While learning about housing typologies, students will also evaluate the ethical role that housing plays within society. The course focuses on the tactical potentials of housing, whether it is to provide a strong community, solve crisis situations, integrate social services, or encourage socio-economic mixture. Students will learn housing design principles and organizational strategies, and the impact of design on the urban environment. They will discuss themes of shared spaces and defensible spaces; and how design can accommodate the evolving demographics and culture of this country. For example, how can housing design address the changing relationship between living and working? What is the role of housing and ownership in economic mobility? These issues will be discussed within the context the changing composition of the American population and economy. n nThis course will be primarily discussion-based, using slideshows, readings and field trips as a departure points for student-generated conversations. Each student will be asked to lead a class discussion based on his/her research topic. Students will evaluate projects, identifying which aspects of the initial housing visions were realized, which did not, and why. Eventually, students might identify factors that lead to ¿successful¿ projects, and/or formulate new approaches that can strengthen or redefine the progressive role of housing: one inclusive of the complex social, economic, and ethical dimensions of design.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Choe, B. (PI)

CEE 107S: Understanding Energy - Essentials (CEE 207S)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts ¿ and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, assignments, and one o more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. Students will learn the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts ¿ and will be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 3 units, which includes lecture, readings and videos, assignments, and one off-site field trips. Field trip offerings differ each quarter (see syllabus for updated list), but for the spring quarter may include Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant, Shasta dam, Tesla Gigafactory, NextEra wind farm, San Ardo oil field, Geyser¿s geothermal power plants, etc. Students choose one field trip from approximately 8 that are offered. For the summer quarter, one off-campus field trip will be offered and required. Enroll for 4 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). This is a course for all: pre-majors and majors, with any background ¿ no prior energy knowledge necessary. For a course that covers all of this plus goes more in-depth into the technical aspects of each energy resource, check out CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103 Understanding Energy offered in the autumn quarter (cannot take both for credit). This course was formerly called Energy Resources. Website: http://web.stanford.edu/class/cee207a/ nPrerequisites: Algebra. May not be taken for credit by students who have completed CEE 107A/207A/ EarthSys 103
Terms: Spr, Sum | Units: 3-4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

CEE 120C: Parametric Design and Optimization (CEE 220C)

This course explores tools and techniques for computational design and parametric modeling as a foundation for design optimization. Class sessions will introduce several parametric design modeling platforms and scripting environments that enable rapid generation of 3D models and enable rapid evaluation of parametrically-driven design alternatives.nnTopics to be featured include:n-Principles of parametric design vs. direct modelingn-Design exploration using parametric modeling platforms (Revit/FormIt, Rhino)n-Visual scripting languages and environments (Dynamo, Grasshopper, DesignScript)n-Single- and multi-dimensional optimization techniques and guidance strategies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 120S: Building Information Modeling Special Study (CEE 220S)

Special studies of Building Information Modeling strategies and techniques focused on creating, managing, and applying models in the building design and construction process. Processes and tools for creating, organizing, and working with 2D and 3D computer representations of building components to produce models used in design, construction planning, visualization, and analysis.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 2-4 | Repeatable for credit | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 122B: Computer Integrated A/E/C

Undergraduates serve as apprentices to graduate students in the AEC global project teams in CEE 222B. Project activity focuses on modeling, simulation, life-cycle cost, and cost benefit analysis in the project development phase. Prerequisite: CEE 122A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Fruchter, R. (PI)
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