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1 - 10 of 101 results for: CEE ; Currently searching spring courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

CEE 31Q: Accessing Architecture Through Drawing

Preference to sophomores. Drawing architecture provides a deeper understanding of the intricacies and subtleties that characterize contemporary buildings. How to dissect buildings and appreciate the formal elements of a building, including scale, shape, proportion, colors and materials, and the problem solving reflected in the design. Students construct conventional architectural drawings, such as plans, elevations, and perspectives. Limited enrollment.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-CE
Instructors: Barton, J. (PI)

CEE 33B: Japanese Modern Architecture

This seminar will examine Japanese architecture and theory since 1900. Through a combination of case studies, readings, and chronological overview, students will develop an in-depth understanding of the aesthetic, expression of construction, structural dynamics, material choices, and philosophical viewpoints that impact Japanese modern and contemporary architectural design. Through lectures, class discussions, a series of weekly writing assignments, and a longer paper and presentation, students will develop the tools to analyze and understand Japanese design of today.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4

CEE 102W: Technical and Professional Communication (ENGR 102W)

Effective communication skills will help you advance quickly. Learn the best technical and professional techniques in writing and speaking. Group workshops and individual conferences with instructors. Designed for undergraduates going into industry. Allowed to fulfill WIM for Atmosphere/Energy and Environmental Systems Engineering majors only.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3

CEE 107A: Understanding Energy (CEE 207A, EARTHSYS 103)

Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The more »
Energy is the number one contributor to climate change and has significant consequences for our society, political system, economy, and environment. Energy is also a fundamental driver of human development and opportunity. In taking this course, students will not only understand the fundamentals of each energy resource -- including significance and potential, conversion processes and technologies, drivers and barriers, policy and regulation, and social, economic, and environmental impacts -- students will also be able to put this in the context of the broader energy system. Both depletable and renewable energy resources are covered, including oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, biomass and biofuel, hydroelectric, wind, solar thermal and photovoltaics (PV), geothermal, and ocean energy, with cross-cutting topics including electricity, storage, climate change and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), sustainability, green buildings, energy efficiency, transportation, and the developing world. The course is 4 units, which includes lecture and in-class discussion, readings and videos, homework assignments, virtual field trips, and a small-group discussion section once a week for 50 minutes (live participation is required, many different times will be offered). Lectures will be recorded and available on Canvas. No in-person field trips will be offered for AY 2020-2021 ¿ but alumni of the class can optionally attend field trips in future quarters. Enroll for 5 units to also attend the Workshop, an interactive discussion section on cross-cutting topics that meets once per week for 80 minutes (timing TBD). The 3-unit option requires instructor approval - please contact Diana Gragg. Open to all: pre-majors and majors, with any background! Website: https://energy.stanford.edu/understanding-energy. CEE 107S/207S Understanding Energy: Essentials is a shorter (3 unit) version of this course, offered summer quarter. Students should not take both for credit. Prerequisites: Algebra.
Terms: Aut, Spr | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-EngrAppSci, WAY-SI

CEE 114: Frontier Technology: Understanding and Preparing for Technology in the Next Economy (CEE 214, MED 114, MED 214, PSYC 114)

The next wave of technological innovation and globalization will affect our countries, our societies, and ourselves. This interdisciplinary course provides an introduction to frontier technology, the intersection where radical forward thinking and real-world implementation meet. Topics covered include artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and advanced robotics, smart cities and urban mobility, telecommunications with 5G, and other key emerging technologies in society. These technologies have vast potential to address the largest global challenges of the 21st century, ushering in a new era of progress and change. Limited enrollment, contact instructors for application.
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 2

CEE 118Z: Shaping the Future of the Bay Area (CEE 218Z, ESS 118Z, ESS 218Z, GEOLSCI 118Z, GEOLSCI 218Z, GEOPHYS 118Z, GEOPHYS 218Z, POLISCI 218Z)

Students are placed in small interdisciplinary teams (engineers and non-engineers, undergraduate and graduate level) to work on complex design, engineering, and policy problems presented by external partners in a real urban setting. Multiple projects are offered and may span both Winter and Spring quarters; students are welcome to participate in one or both quarters. Students are expected to interact professionally with government and community stakeholders, conduct independent team work outside of class sessions, and submit deliverables over a series of milestones. Prerequisite: the Autumn (X) skills course or approval of instructors. For information about the projects and application process, visit http://bay.stanford.edu.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-5 | Repeatable 2 times (up to 10 units total)

CEE 120C: Parametric Design and Optimization (CEE 220C)

This course explores tools and techniques for computational design and parametric modeling as a foundation for design optimization. Class sessions will introduce several parametric design modeling platforms and scripting environments that enable rapid generation of 3D models and enable rapid evaluation of parametrically-driven design alternatives.nnTopics to be featured include:n-Principles of parametric design vs. direct modelingn-Design exploration using parametric modeling platforms (Revit/FormIt, Rhino)n-Visual scripting languages and environments (Dynamo, Grasshopper, DesignScript)n-Single- and multi-dimensional optimization techniques and guidance strategies.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2-4
Instructors: Katz, G. (PI)

CEE 122B: Computer Integrated A/E/C

Undergraduates serve as apprentices to graduate students in the AEC global project teams in CEE 222B. Project activity focuses on modeling, simulation, life-cycle cost, and cost benefit analysis in the project development phase. Prerequisite: CEE 122A.
Terms: Spr | Units: 2
Instructors: Fruchter, R. (PI)

CEE 124: Sustainable Development Studio

(Graduate students register for 224A.) Project-based. Sustainable design, development, use and evolution of buildings; connections of building systems to broader resource systems. Areas include architecture, structure, materials, energy, water, air, landscape, and food. Projects use a cradle-to-cradle approach focusing on technical and biological nutrient cycles and information and knowledge generation and organization. May be repeated for credit.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit
Instructors: Fischer, M. (PI)

CEE 126Z: Hard Earth: The Interconnected Impacts of Global Climate Change (EARTH 126Z)

The COVID crisis makes one thing clear: society is ill-equipped to deal with disasters that do not respect borders and can cripple social and economic systems. Climate change, though radically different from a virus, similarly is a global threat. This class will feature virtual biweekly talks by four graduate students whose research probes a changing climate's already-occurring impacts on livelihoods, jobs, food, and social safety nets around the world. In the weeks in between the talks, we will hold a group discussion to explore how we can, as a global society, re-imagine our response to disaster.
Terms: Spr | Units: 1
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