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1 - 10 of 31 results for: BIOE ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIOE 44: Fundamentals for Engineering Biology Lab

An introduction to next-generation techniques in genetic, molecular, biochemical, and cellular engineering. Lectures cover advances in the field of synthetic biology with emphasis on genetic engineering, CRISPR gene editing technology, the DIY bio movement, plasmid design, gene synthesis, genetic circuits, safety and bio ethics. At-home lab modules will teach students how to isolate DNA from living matter, make genetic alterations by plasmid transformations and introduce students to experimental design. During the final weeks of the course students work in groups to design a DNA device. Group projects will build upon current research including: gene and genome engineering via decoupled design, component engineering with a focus on molecular design and quantitative analysis of experiments, device and system engineering using abstracted genetically encoded objects, and product development based on useful applications of biological technologies. Concurrent or previous enrollment in BIO 82 or BIO 83.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOE 60: Beyond Bitcoin: Applications of Distributed Trust

In the past, people have relied on trusted third parties to facilitate the transactions that define our lives: how we store medical records, how we share genomic information with scientists and drug companies, where we get our news, and how we communicate. Advances in distributed systems and cryptography allow us to eschew such parties. Today, we can create a global, irrefutable ledger of transactions, events, and diagnoses, such that rewriting history is computationally infeasible. What can we build on top of such a powerful data structure? What are the consequences of pseudo-legal contracts and promises written in mathematical ink? In this class, we will bring together experts in cryptography, healthcare, and distributed consensus with students across the university. The first weeks present a technical overview of block chain primitives. In the following weeks, the class will focus on discussing applications and policy issues through lectures and guest speakers from various domains across both academia and industry. Limited enrollment, subject to instructor approval.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Liphardt, J. (PI)

BIOE 91B: Race in Technology (AFRICAAM 51B, CEE 151B, COMM 51B, CSRE 51B, HUMBIO 71B, STS 51B)

What are the roles of race and racism in science, technology, and medicine? 3-course sequence; each quarter can be taken independently. Winter quarter focuses on technology. How do race and racism affect the design and social impact of technology, broadly defined? Can new or different technology help to reduce racial bias? Invited speakers will address the role of race in such issues as energy infrastructure, nuclear arms control, algorithmic accountability, machine learning, artificial intelligence, and synthetic biology. Talks will take a variety of forms, ranging from panel discussions to interviews and lectures. Weekly assignments: read a related article and participate in an online discussion.
Terms: Win | Units: 1
Instructors: Edwards, P. (PI)

BIOE 122: BioSecurity and Pandemic Resilience (EMED 122, EMED 222, PUBLPOL 122, PUBLPOL 222)

Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promi more »
Overview of the most pressing biosecurity issues facing the world today, with a special focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. Critical examination of ways of enhancing biosecurity and pandemic resilience to the current and future pandemics. Examination of how the US and the world is able to withstand a pandemic or a bioterrorism attack, how the medical/healthcare field, government, and technology sectors are involved in biosecurity and pandemic or bioterrorism preparedness and response and how they interface; the rise of synthetic biology with its promises and threats; global bio-surveillance; effectiveness of various containment and mitigation measures; hospital surge capacity; medical challenges; development, production, and distribution of countermeasures such as vaccines and drugs; supply chain challenges; public health and policy aspects of pandemic preparedness and response; administrative and engineering controls to enhance pandemic resilience; testing approaches and challenges; promising technologies for pandemic response and resilience, and other relevant topics. Guest lecturers have included former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, former Special Assistant on BioSecurity to Presidents Clinton and Bush Jr. Dr. Ken Bernard, Chief Medical Officer of the Homeland Security Department Dr. Alex Garza, eminent scientists, public health leaders, innovators and physicians in the field, and leaders of relevant technology companies. Open to medical, graduate, and undergraduate students. No prior background in biology necessary. Additional 1 unit for writing a research paper for 5 units total maximum.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-SI
Instructors: Trounce, M. (PI)

BIOE 123: Bioengineering Systems Prototyping Lab

The Bioengineering System Prototyping Laboratory is a fast-paced, team-based system engineering experience, in which teams of 2-3 students design and build a fermenter that meets a set of common requirements along with a set of unique team-determined requirements. Students learn-by-doing hands-on skills in electronics and mechanical design and fabrication. Teams also develop process skills and an engineering mindset by aligning specifications with requirements, developing output metrics and measuring performance, and creating project proposals and plans. The course culminates in demonstration of a fully functioning fermenter that meets the teams' self-determined metrics. n nLearning goals: 1) Design, fabricate, integrate, and characterize practical electronic and mechanical hardware systems that meet clear requirements in the context of Bioengineering (i.e., build something that works). 2) Use prototyping tools, techniques, and instruments, including: CAD, 3D printing, laser cutting, m more »
The Bioengineering System Prototyping Laboratory is a fast-paced, team-based system engineering experience, in which teams of 2-3 students design and build a fermenter that meets a set of common requirements along with a set of unique team-determined requirements. Students learn-by-doing hands-on skills in electronics and mechanical design and fabrication. Teams also develop process skills and an engineering mindset by aligning specifications with requirements, developing output metrics and measuring performance, and creating project proposals and plans. The course culminates in demonstration of a fully functioning fermenter that meets the teams' self-determined metrics. n nLearning goals: 1) Design, fabricate, integrate, and characterize practical electronic and mechanical hardware systems that meet clear requirements in the context of Bioengineering (i.e., build something that works). 2) Use prototyping tools, techniques, and instruments, including: CAD, 3D printing, laser cutting, microcontrollers, and oscilloscopes. 3) Create quantitative system specifications and test measurement plans to demonstrate that a design meets user requirements. 4) Communicate design elements, choices, specifications, and performance through design reviews and written reports. 5) Collaborate as a team member on a complex system design project (e.g., a fermenter). n nLimited enrollment, with priority for Bioengineering undergraduates. Prerequisites: Physics 43, or equivalent. Experience with Matlab and/or Python is recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIOE 141B: Senior Capstone Design II

Lecture/Lab. Second course of two-quarter capstone sequence. Team based project introduces students to the process of designing new biological technologies to address societal needs. Emphasis is on implementing and testing the design from the first quarter with the at least one round of prototype iteration. Guest lectures and practical demonstrations are incorporated. Prerequisites: BIOE123 and BIOE44. This course is open only to seniors in the undergraduate Bioengineering program. IMPORTANT NOTE: class meets in Shriram 112.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 150: Biochemical Engineering (CHEMENG 150, CHEMENG 250)

Systems-level combination of chemical engineering concepts with biological principles. The production of protein pharmaceuticals as a paradigm to explore quantitative biochemistry and cellular physiology, the elemental stoichiometry of metabolism, recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology and metabolic engineering, fermentation development and control, product isolation and purification, protein folding and formulation, and biobusiness and regulatory issues. Prerequisite: CHEMENG 181 (formerly 188) or BIOSCI 41 or equivalent.
Terms: Win | Units: 3

BIOE 177: Inventing the Future

The famous computer scientist, Alan Kay, once said, "The best way to predict the future is to invent it." As such, we are all responsible for inventing the future we hope we and our descendants will experience. In this highly interactive course, we will be exploring how to predict and invent the future and why this is important by focusing on a wide range of frontier technologies, such as robotics, AI, genomics, autonomous vehicles, blockchain, 3D Printing, VR/AR, synthetic meat, etc. The class will feature debates in which students present utopian and dystopian scenarios, and determine what has to be done to inoculate ourselves against the negative consequences. Limited enrollment. Admission by application: dschool.stanford.edu/classes.
Terms: Win | Units: 4

BIOE 191: Bioengineering Problems and Experimental Investigation

Directed study and research for undergraduates on a subject of mutual interest to student and instructor. Prerequisites: consent of instructor and adviser. (Staff)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-5 | Repeatable for credit

BIOE 191X: Out-of-Department Advanced Research Laboratory in Bioengineering

Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 1-15 | Repeatable 15 times (up to 60 units total)
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