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1 - 10 of 55 results for: BIO ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

BIO 7N: Conservation Photography

Introduction to the field of conservation photography and the strategic use of visual communication in addressing issues concerning the environment and conservation. Students will be introduced to basic digital photography, digital image processing, and the theory and application of photographic techniques. Case studies of conservation issues will be examined through photographs and multimedia platforms including images, video, and audio. Lectures, tutorials, demonstrations, and optional field trips will culminate in the production of individual and group projects.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

BIO 8N: Human Origins

A survey of the anatomical and behavioral evidence for human evolution and of the increasingly important information from molecular genetics. Emphasis on the split between the human and chimpanzee lines 6-7 million years ago, the appearance of the australopiths by 4.1 million years ago, the emergence of the genus Homo about 2.5 million years ago, the spread of Homo from Africa 1.7-1.6 million years ago, the subsequent divergence of Homo into different species on different continents, and the expansion of fully modern humans (Homo sapiens) from Africa about 50,000 years ago to replace the Neanderthals and other non-modern Eurasians.
Terms: Win | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 30: Ecology for Everyone

Ecology is the science of interactions and the changes they generate. This project-based course links individual behavior, population growth, species interactions, and ecosystem function. Introduction to measurement, observation, experimental design and hypothesis testing in field projects. The goal is to learn to think analytically about everyday ecological processes, including those that you participate in, which involve bacteria, fungi, plants, animals and humans. The course uses basic statistics to analyze data; there are no math prerequisites except arithmetic. Open to everyone, including those who may be headed for more advanced courses in ecology and environmental science. The online version will meet synchronously and involve preparation outside of class for interactive discussions during class time. We will organize field projects that you can do wherever you are. Projects begin in the first week of the quarter. For questions please contact Prof. Gordon at dmgordon@stanford.edu.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA
Instructors: Gordon, D. (PI)

BIO 45: Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human tumor suppressor protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as Guardian of the Genome through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of normal and mutant p53 proteins. Learn about the assays used to study the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, investigate further and identify what could be wrong with the p53 mutants you have been studying. Learn how to ask a question, test a hypothesis, conduct experiments and analyze data, and present your findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Although there are no pre-requisites to enroll in this class, it will be helpful if you have already taken or are concurrently enrolled in the appropriate Biology Foundation classes (or HumBio core classes). Additionally, it will also be helpful if you have already taken CHEM 31M, or 31A & B.
Terms: Aut, Win, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 46: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using topics in Ecology as practical examples. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course focuses on the microorganisms associated with lichen epiphytes and their interactions with air pollution and other environmental variables. Students, working in teams, develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. Because the course will be online this year, we will analyze data collected in previous years rather than conducting field and lab experiments in person. In addition, students will learn how to manipulate, visualize, and analyze data in R. The capstone of the course is a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article, as well as an educational video designed for a general audience that communicates research findings. IMPORTANT NOTE: Students who require BIO 46 to satisfy the WIM requirement for the Biology major MUST take this course for a letter grade (except in 2020-21).
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 62: Microbiology Experiments

Micro-X is an on-ramp course in which we explore classic to modern bacteriology experiments with a focus on design and logic. Bacterial biochemistry, structure, metabolism, and genetics are covered in lecture. The lab includes microbial culture, microscopic examination, and bacteriophage discovery and characterization. Enrollment limited; application required. Apply at https://forms.gle/x37kwXvJxvQmN1sA6 by December 3rd to get preference for enrollment.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
Instructors: Long, S. (PI)

BIO 82: Genetics

The focus of the course is on the basic mechanisms underlying the transmission of genetic information and on the use of genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. Major topics will include: (1) the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify genes that play an important role in determining traits and disease-susceptibility, (2) the analysis of mutations in model organisms and their use in the investigation of biological processes and questions and (3) using genetic information for diagnosis and the potential for genetic manipulations to treat disease. Prerequisites: None, but BIO 83 is recommended.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 84: Physiology

The focus of Physiology is on understanding how organisms tackle the physical challenges of life on Earth. This course will provide an overview of animal and plant physiology and teach an understanding of how organisms maintain homeostasis, respond to environmental cues and coordinate behaviors across multiples tissues and organ systems. We will examine the structure and function of organs and organ systems and how those systems are controlled and regulated to maintain homeostasis. Control and regulation requires information as does the ability to respond to environmental stimuli, so we will give special consideration to hormonal and neural information systems. We will also be concerned with the interactions and integration of the activities of the different organ systems we study. Prerequisites: none.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 85: Evolution

Understanding evolution is key to understanding the diversity of life on earth. We will be focusing on the fundamental principles of evolutionary biology from natural and sexual selection to the formation of new species. To understand these concepts we will delve into the mechanisms that underlie them. The course will also link these fundamental processes to important contemporary evolutionary topics such as the evolution of behavior, life history evolution, and human evolution. Prerequisites: BIO 60 or 61 or 62 or equivalent; recommended: BIO 82, or permission of instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA

BIO 105A: Ecology and Natural History of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve (EARTHSYS 105A)

Jasper Ridge Docent Training. First of two-quarter sequence training program to join the Jasper Ridge education/docent program. The scientific basis of ecological research in the context of a field station, hands-on field research, field ecology and the natural history of plants and animals, species interactions, archaeology, geology, hydrology, land management, multidisciplinary environmental education; and research projects, as well as management challenges of the preserve presented by faculty, local experts, and staff. Participants lead research-focused educational tours, assist with classes and research, and attend continuing education classes available to members of the JRBP community after the course. NOTE: All classes take place at Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.
Terms: Win | Units: 4
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