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1 - 10 of 54 results for: BIO

BIO 2N: Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Disease in a Changing World

This seminar will explore the ways in which anthropogenic change, climate change, habitat destruction, land use change, and species invasions effects the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases. Topics will include infectious diseases of humans, wildlife, livestock, and crops, effects of disease on threatened species, disease spillover, emerging diseases, and the role of disease in natural systems. Course will be taught through a combination of popular and scientific readings, discussion, and lecture. .
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Mordecai, E. (PI)

BIO 3N: Views of a Changing Sea: Literature & Science

The state of a changing world ocean, particularly in the eastern Pacific, will be examined through historical and contemporary fiction, non-fiction and scientific publications. Issues will include harvest and mariculture fisheries, land-sea interactions and oceanic climate change in both surface and deep waters.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 8N: Human Origins

A survey of the anatomical and behavioral evidence for human evolution and of the increasingly important information from molecular genetics. Emphasis on the split between the human and chimpanzee lines 6-7 million years ago, the appearance of the australopiths by 4.1 million years ago, the emergence of the genus Homo about 2.5 million years ago, the spread of Homo from Africa 1.7-1.6 million years ago, the subsequent divergence of Homo into different species on different continents, and the expansion of fully modern humans (Homo sapiens) from Africa about 50,000 years ago to replace the Neanderthals and other non-modern Eurasians.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Klein, R. (PI)

BIO 13Q: Hacking the Genome

In this course, we will examine the technologies read our genetic makeup - in consumer products as well as in health and medicine - and what we can (and can't) learn about ourselves from that data. We will consider gene editing methods and their applications in health, epidemiology and agriculture, with a spotlight on the CRISPR revolution. This course will include a combination of scientific and popular literature, bioethical debates, and a short laboratory component.
Terms: Spr, offered once only | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Sankaran, S. (PI)

BIO 24N: Visions of Paradise: Garden Design

Through literature readings and field trips to local gardens learn the principles and esthetics of classic garden designs: Italian Renaissance, botanical teaching, Japanese, English cottage, and others. Design a personal vision of paradise with details of species, visual and scent impact, water features, and hardscape. Open your eyes to a new appreciation of the world of plants and learn some physiology and genetics that explains the specific properties of individual species.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Walbot, V. (PI)

BIO 25Q: Cystic fibrosis: from medical conundrum to precision medicine success story

Preference to sophomores. The class will explore cystic fibrosis (CF), the most prevalent fatal genetic disease in the US, as a scientific and medical whodunit. Through reading and discussion of medical and scientific literature, we will tackle questions that include: how was life expectancy with CF increased from weeks to decades without understanding the disease mechanism? Why is the disease so prevalent? Is there an advantage to being a carrier? Is CF a single disease or a continuum of physiological variation ¿or- what is a disease? How did research into CF lead to discovery of the underlying cause of most other genetic diseases as well?nnThrough critical reading of the scientific and medical literature, class discussion, field trips and meetings with genetic counselors, caregivers, patients, physicians and researchers, we will work to build a deep understanding of this disease, from the biochemical basis to the current controversies over pathogenic mechanisms, treatment strategies and the ethics and economics of genetic testing and astronomical drug costs.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Kopito, R. (PI)

BIO 33N: Conservation Science and Practice

Preference to freshmen. This course will explore the potential for harmonizing people and nature, for achieving improved outcomes in the well-being of both as a result of conservation investments and interventions. We will consider biophysical, economic, social, and psychological perspectives, examining an array of conservation goals, from protecting endangered species to securing ecosystem services (such as flood control and climate stability) to alleviating poverty and improving mental well-being. We will also study the design and implementation of real conservation and human development efforts worldwide, among the many farmers, ranchers, fishing people, and others managing Earth's lands and waters. Highlights include a field trip to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford¿s very own nature reserve, and guest visits of some impressive conservation leaders internationally.
Terms: not given this year | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 35N: Climate change ecology: Is it too late?

This Introductory Seminar will explore the consequences of climate change on ecological communities, focusing on two emerging concepts: "disequilibrium," which emphasizes that it can take long time for communities to respond to climate change because of species interactions, and "historical contingency," which proposes that the order in which species invade and disappear as communities re-assemble in response to climate change will determine which species will persist. The seminar will involve lecture, discussion, writing, and visit to Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Fukami, T. (PI)

BIO 47: Introduction to Research in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

The goal of this course is to develop an understanding of how to conduct biological research, using a topic in Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Plant Biology as a practical example. This includes the complete scientific process: assessing background literature, generating testable hypotheses, learning techniques for field- and lab-based data collection, analyzing data using appropriate statistical methods, and finally writing and sharing results. To build these skills, this course will focus on nectar microbes at Stanford's nearby Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve. Students, working in teams, will develop novel research hypotheses and execute the necessary experiments and measurements to test these hypotheses. The capstone of the course will be an oral defense of students' findings, as well as a research paper in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. Labs will be completed both on campus and at Jasper Ridge. Lab fee. Information about this class is available at http://bio44.stanford.edu. Satisfies WIM in Biology.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 62: Microbiology Experiments

Micro-X is an on-ramp course in which we explore classic to modern bacteriology experiments with a focus on design and logic. Bacterial biochemistry, structure, metabolism, and genetics are covered in lecture. The lab includes microbial culture, microscopic examination, and bacteriophage discovery and characterization.
Terms: Spr | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit
Instructors: Long, S. (PI)
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