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1 - 10 of 41 results for: BIO

BIO 3: Frontiers in Marine Biology

An introduction to contemporary research in marine biology, including ecology, conservation biology, environmental toxicology, behavior, biomechanics, evolution, neurobiology, and molecular biology. Emphasis is on new discoveries and the technologies used to make them. Weekly lectures by faculty from the Hopkins Marine Station.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 12N: Sensory Ecology of Marine Animals

Animals living in the oceans experience a highly varied range of environmental stimuli. An aquatic lifestyle requires an equally rich range of sensory adaptations, including some that are totally foreign to us. In this course we will examine sensory system in marine animals from both an environmental and behavioral perspective and from the point of view of neuroscience and information systems engineering.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Thompson, S. (PI)

BIO 45: Introduction to Laboratory Research in Cell and Molecular Biology

Investigate yeast strains that are engineered to express the human tumor suppressor protein, p53, and use modern molecular methods to identify the functional consequences of p53 mutations isolated from tumor cells. Learn about the protein's role as Guardian of the Genome through lectures and by reading and discussing journal articles. Use molecular visualization programs to examine the structure of normal and mutant p53 proteins. Assay the ability of mutant p53 to direct expression of several reporter genes. During guided reflection, investigate further and identify what could be wrong with the p53 mutants you have been studying. Conduct lab experiments to test hypotheses, analyze data, and present your findings through a team oral presentation, as well as a scientific poster. Although there are no pre-requisites to enroll in this class, having taken CHEM 31X, or 31A and B, and 33 and being concurrently enrolled or past enrollment in appropriate Biology Foundation classes or HumBio core classes is recommended. Note: This class has a $25 course fee.
Terms: Aut, Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 52: I, Scientist: Diversity Improves the Scientific Practice (CSRE 52H)

Disciplinary priorities, research agendas, and innovations are determined by the diversity of participants and problem-solving is more successful with a broad range of approaches. Using case studies in scientific research, we propose to use these insights to help our students learn why a diverse scientific community leads to better discovery and improves the relevance of science to society. Our premise is that a diverse set of perspectives will impact not only how we learn science, but how we do science.
Terms: Aut | Units: 1 | Grading: Satisfactory/No Credit

BIO 61: Science as a Creative Process (APPPHYS 61)

What is the process of science, and why does creativity matter? We'll delve deeply into the applicability of science in addressing a vast range of real-world problems. This course is designed to teach the scientific method as it's actually practiced by working scientists. It will cover how to ask a well-posed question, how to design a good experiment, how to collect and interpret quantitative data, how to recover from error, and how to communicate findings. Facts matter! Course topics will include experimental design, statistics and statistical significance, formulating appropriate controls, modeling, peer review, and more. The course will incorporate a significant hands-on component featuring device fabrication, testing, and measurement. Among other "Dorm Science" activities, we'll be distributing Arduino microcontroller kits and electronic sensors, then use these items, along with other materials, to complete a variety of group and individual projects outside the classroom. The final course assignment will be to develop and write a scientific grant proposal to test a student-selected myth or scientific controversy. Although helpful, no prior experience with electronics or computer programming is required. Recommended for freshmen.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-AQR, WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 81: Introduction to Ecology

This course will introduce you to the first principles of the science of ecology, the study of interactions between organisms and their environment. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 82: Genetics

The focus of the course is on the basic mechanisms underlying the transmission of genetic information and on the use of genetic analysis to study biological and medical questions. Major topics will include: (1) the use of existing genetic variation in humans and other species to identify genes that play an important role in determining traits and disease-susceptibility, (2) the analysis of mutations in model organisms and their use in the investigation of biological processes and questions and (3) using genetic information for diagnosis and the potential for genetic manipulations to treat disease. Prerequisites: None.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 116: Ecology of the Hawaiian Islands (EARTHSYS 116)

Terrestrial and marine ecology and conservation biology of the Hawaiian Archipelago. Taught in the field in Hawaii as part of quarter-long sequence of courses including Earth Sciences and Anthropology. Topics include ecological succession, plant-soil interactions, conservation biology, biological invasions and ecosystem consequences, and coral reef ecology. Restricted to students accepted into the Earth Systems of Hawaii Program.
Terms: Aut | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER: DB-NatSci | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

BIO 141: Biostatistics (STATS 141)

Introductory statistical methods for biological data: describing data (numerical and graphical summaries); introduction to probability; and statistical inference (hypothesis tests and confidence intervals). Intermediate statistical methods: comparing groups (analysis of variance); analyzing associations (linear and logistic regression); and methods for categorical data (contingency tables and odds ratio). Course content integrated with statistical computing in R.
Terms: Aut | Units: 3-5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Math, WAY-AQR | Grading: Letter or Credit/No Credit

BIO 142: Molecular Geomicrobiology Laboratory (EARTHSYS 143, ESS 143, ESS 243)

In this course, students will be studying the biosynthesis of cyclic lipid biomarkers, molecules that are produced by modern microbes that can be preserved in rocks that are over a billion years old and which geologist use as molecular fossils. Students will be tasked with identifying potential biomarker lipid synthesis genes in environmental genomic databases, expressing those genes in a model bacterial expression system in the lab, and then analyzing the lipid products that are produced. The overall goal is for students to experience the scientific research process including generating hypotheses, testing these hypotheses in laboratory experiments, and communicating their results through a publication style paper. Prerequisites: BIO83 and CHEM35 or permission of the instructor.
Terms: Spr | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-SMA | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Welander, P. (PI)
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