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1 - 10 of 40 results for: ARTSTUDI ; Currently searching winter courses. You can expand your search to include all quarters

ARTSTUDI 130: Interactive Art: Making it with Arduino (ARTSTUDI 231A)

Students use electronics and software to create kinetic and interactive elements in artwork. No prior knowledge of electronics or software is required. Students learn to program the Arduino, a small easy-to-use microprocessor control unit ( see http://www.arduino.cc/ ). Learn to connect various sensors such as light, motion, sound and touch and use them to control software. Learn to interface actuators like motors, lights and solenoids to create movement. Learn to connect the Arduino to theMAX/MSP/Jitter programming environment to create media-intensive video and audio environments. Explore the social dimensions of electronic art. (lower level)
Terms: Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 140: Drawing I

Functional anatomy and perspective as they apply to problems of drawing the form in space. Individual and group instruction as students work from still life set-ups, nature, and the model. Emphasis is on the development of critical skills and perceptual drawing techniques for those with little or no previous experience with pastels, inks, charcoal, conte, and pencil. Lectures alternate with studio work. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 145: Painting I

Introduction to techniques, materials, and vocabulary in oil painting. Still life, landscape, and figure used as subject matter. Emphasis is on painting and drawing from life. (lower level)
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr, Sum | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 147: Art Book Object (ARTSTUDI 247A)

This mixed introductory and upper level studio course explores contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object. Students learn to use both traditional and digital tools and techniques for creating artists' books, and integrate those into final works of art. The course familiarizes students with basic bookbinding processes and forms, as well as various modes of printing and production that facilitate limited artist editions. In addition to making books, we view numerous artists' books in the Bowes Art & Architecture Library collection as well as the collection of the instructor, and meet with practicing artists and book makers. Students create a number of small books, each focused on a particular process but using content of their choice. Upper level students propose and create a more fully evolved final project involving at least one bookbinding process independently researched in consultation with the instructor.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Wight, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 151: Sculpture I

Traditional and non-traditional approaches to sculpture production through working with materials including wood, metal, and plaster. Conceptual and technical skills, and safe and appropriate use of tools and materials. Impact of material and technique upon form and content; the physical and expressive possibilities of diverse materials. Historical and contemporary forming methods provide a theoretical basis for studio work. Field trips; guest lecturers.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Hemenway, D. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 152: Soft Sculpture

Textiles lend themselves to be formed and constructed to fit around three-dimensional objects and become a skin to the object within. They can hold materials inside of them, produce imagery, and divide space. This sculpture course investigates fibers and their ability to transform forms and space. Students learn sewing techniques, upholstery techniques, and how to make sewing patterns to create sculptures. Through projects and workshops, students consider the relationships of textiles to the human figure, interior and exterior settings, and traditions in craft.
Terms: Win | Units: 2
Instructors: Grill, G. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 163: Drawing with Code (ARTSINST 142)

This studio course will engage coding practices as drawing tools. What makes a good algorithmic composition? How do we craft rule-sets and parameters to shape an interesting work? What changes if we conceive of still outputs, ongoing processes, or interactive processes as the "finished" work? We will look at the history of algorithmic drawing, including analog precedents like Sol LeWitt and other conceptual artists, along with current pioneers like John Simon Jr., Casey Reas, and LIA. Outputs will involve prints as well as screen-based works. Some basic coding experience is helpful, but not required. Assignments are based on conceptual principals that students can engage with at different coding skill levels. This is a good way for non CS students to explore coding practices as well as for CS students to hone their skills. We will work primarily in the free Processing software for our explorations.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 167: Introduction to Animation

Projects in animation techniques including flipbook, cutout/collage, stop-motion such as claymation, pixilation, and puppet animation, rotoscoping, and time-lapse. Films. Computers used as post-production tools, but course does not cover computer-generated animation. (lower level)
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Miyazaki, M. (PI)

ARTSTUDI 171: Introduction to Photography

This is an introductory course in photography that explores lens-based practices and the imperative of visual literacy in today¿s world. The history of photography starts now, in a context of image-making that proceeds all around us with unprecedented immediacy and proliferation. We cover fundamental principles of camera operation, composition and image editing. Through digital instruction, students learn to use DSLR or Mirrorless cameras and to operate manual settings (focus, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, color temp/white balance). They learn basic file management as well as the use of Adobe Lightroom software. Students acquire an essential knowledge of contemporary art photography, including standards of quality and image sequencing. They get a basic sense of aesthetics and of the critical discourse that exists around the cultural significance of images. Students provide their own DSLR or mirrorless camera.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE

ARTSTUDI 173E: Cell Phone Photography

The course combines the critical analysis of cell phone photography with the creation of photographic art works that explore this specific medium's experimental, social and documentary potential. The increasing ubiquity of cell phone photography has had a widespread impact on the practice of photography as an art form. We will consider and discuss the ways in which the platforms of cell phone photography (Instagram, Snapchat) are democratizing image-making and transforming notions of authorship and subjectivity to an unprecedented extent, but also how the use of new technological tools help expand notions of creativity and aesthetic standards.
Terms: Aut, Win, Spr | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: WAY-CE
Instructors: Peck, S. (PI)
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