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1 - 10 of 34 results for: ARTHIST

ARTHIST 1A: Introduction to the Visual Arts: Prehistoric through Medieval (CLASSICS 56)

A survey of the art and architecture from the cave paintings of Lascaux to the Gothic Cathedrals of France; the material is organized both chronologically and thematically and covers a multiplicity of religions: pagan, Christian, and Islamic.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, GER:EC-GlobalCom, WAY-A-II, WAY-ED | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Nemerov, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 102: Introduction to Greek Art II: The Classical Period (CLASSICS 162)

The class begins with the art, architecture and political ideals of Periclean Athens, from the emergence of the city as the political and cultural center of Greece in 450 to its defeat in the Peloponnesian War in 404. It then considers how Athens and the rest of Greece proceed in the fourth century to rebuild their lives and the monuments that define them. Earlier artistic traditions endure, with subtle changes, in the work of sculptors such as Kephisodotos. Less subtle are the outlook and output of his son Praxiteles. In collaboration with Phryne, his muse and mistress, Praxiteles challenged the canons and constraints of the past with the first female nude in the history of Greek sculpture. His gender-bending depictions of gods and men were equally audacious, their shiny surfaces reflecting Plato¿s discussion of Eros and androgyny. Scopas was also a man of his time but pursued different interests. Drawn to the inner lives of men and woman, his tormented Trojan War heroes and victims a more »
The class begins with the art, architecture and political ideals of Periclean Athens, from the emergence of the city as the political and cultural center of Greece in 450 to its defeat in the Peloponnesian War in 404. It then considers how Athens and the rest of Greece proceed in the fourth century to rebuild their lives and the monuments that define them. Earlier artistic traditions endure, with subtle changes, in the work of sculptors such as Kephisodotos. Less subtle are the outlook and output of his son Praxiteles. In collaboration with Phryne, his muse and mistress, Praxiteles challenged the canons and constraints of the past with the first female nude in the history of Greek sculpture. His gender-bending depictions of gods and men were equally audacious, their shiny surfaces reflecting Plato¿s discussion of Eros and androgyny. Scopas was also a man of his time but pursued different interests. Drawn to the inner lives of men and woman, his tormented Trojan War heroes and victims are still scarred by memories of the Peloponnesian War, and a world away from the serene faces of the Parthenon. His famous Maenad, a devotee of Dionysos who has left this world for another, belongs to the same years as Euripides' Bacchae and, at the same time, anticipates the torsion and turbulence of Bernini and the Italian Baroque. In the work of these and other fourth century personalities, the stage is set for Alexander the Great and his conquest of a kingdom extending from Greece to the Indus River. (Formerly CLASSART 102)
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | UG Reqs: GER:DB-Hum, WAY-A-II | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Maxmin, J. (PI)

ARTHIST 110: French Painting from Watteau to Monet (ARTHIST 310, FRENCH 110, FRENCH 310)

This course offers a survey of painting in France from 1700 to around 1900. It introduces major artists, artworks, and the concepts used by contemporary observers and later art historians to make sense of this extraordinarily rich period. Overarching themes discussed in the class will include the dueling legacies of coloristic virtuosity and classical formalism, new ways of representing visual perception, the opposing artistic effects of absorption and theatricality, the rise and fall of official arts institutions, and the participation of artists and artworks in political upheaval and social change. The course ends with an interrogation of the concept of modernity and its emergence out of dialogue and conflict with artists of the past. Students will learn and practice formal analysis of paintings, as well as interpretations stressing historical context.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Pesic, A. (PI)

ARTHIST 142A: The Architecture of Thought: Artists and Thinkers Design for Themselves (ARTHIST 342A)

This course investigates houses, hideaways, and studios that artists and thinkers have designed for themselves with varying degrees of self-consciousness, from subconscious images of the self to knowing stages for the contemplative life. Case studies range from antiquity to the present, from the studio-house of Peter Paul Rubens to that of Kurt Schwitters; from the house-museum of Sir John Soane to the Vittoriale of Gabriele D'Annunzio; from the philosophical dwelling of the Emperor Hadrian to that of Ludwig Wittgenstein.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Barry, F. (PI)

ARTHIST 151: Migration and Diaspora in American Art, 1800-Present (AMSTUD 151, ARTHIST 351, CSRE 151D)

This lecture course explores American art through the lens of immigration, exile, and diaspora. We will examine a wide range of work by immigrant artists and craftsmen, paying special attention to issues of race and ethnicity, assimilation, displacement, and political turmoil. Artists considered include Emmanuel Leutze, Thomas Cole, Joseph Stella, Chiura Obata, Willem de Kooning, Mona Hatoum, and Julie Mehretu, among many others. How do works of art reflect and help shape cultural and individual imaginaries of home and belonging?
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Kwon, M. (PI)

ARTHIST 183: Theatre of the World: Contemporary Chinese Art (ARTHIST 383)

This course examines the intense and profound changes in Chinese Art from the end of Cultural Revolution to the first decades of the twenty-first century. Multiple course meetings will take place in the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, where the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theater of the World will be on view. We will explore how artists express their ways of grappling with the social, political, economic, and personal issues through art. Major topics include cultural multiplicity, global challenge, consumerism, site specificity, and deconstructing and reconstructing of identities, among others. Our discussions will constantly incorporate factors of China's domestic context, global network, and artists' individual connections in order for students to understand the rich and complex dynamics of Chinese contemporary art.
Terms: Win | Units: 4 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Lo, H. (PI)

ARTHIST 202: Inherent Vice (ARTHIST 402)

Taught jointly by an art historian and a senior conservator, this research seminar focuses on selected objects (mostly) of modern and contemporary art many in Stanford collections -- that pose significant condition and/or conservation challenges for long term maintenance and display. Together we will examine the objects in the conservation lab and/or the gallery; students will then confer with appropriate museum staff, consult relevant curatorial and conservation files, research and debate potential treatments, and write up reports of their findings. Issues of aesthetics, ethics and other problems bearing on the material longevity of art will be explored together in class discussions as a foundation for thinking about the preservation and exhibition of works of art.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 224N: The Popular Culture of Abstract Art

This course exposes the pop culture dimensions of major movements in modern abstract art, including Cubism (Braque, Picasso), Dada (Duchamp, Schwitters), Suprematism (Malevich), Purism (Léger, Le Corbusier), Art Deco (Sonia Delaunay), De Stijl (Mondrian), Abstract Expressionism (Pollock). Rather than difficult, austere or elitist, abstraction turns out to be engaging not only on a formal and visual level but also for its interactions with popular music, café culture, newsprint, found objects, automobiles and other modes of transportation, and the idea of spontaneous action.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Troy, N. (PI)

ARTHIST 225: Wonder, Curiosity & Collecting: Building a Stanford Cabinet of Curiosities (HISTORY 205J, HISTORY 305J)

Inside every museum lies a cabinet of curiosities. Explores the history of wonder, curiosity, and collecting, with special attention to the Renaissance origins of the cabinet of curiosities and their modern afterlives. Hands-on experience working with the Stanford collection in the Cantor to create a contemporary cabinet in collaboration with artist Mark Dion. This will be a unique opportunity to create a Stanford cabinet of curiosities for the twenty-first century. All seminar participants will contribute to the published exhibit catalogue.
Terms: Win | Units: 4-5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)

ARTHIST 242B: Megacities (ANTHRO 42, URBANST 142)

In this course we will examine the meaning, processes, and challenges of urbanization. Through a series of targeted readings across history and geography and through the study of varied means of representation (anthropology, literature, cartography, film, etc), the class will analyze the ways in which urban forms have come into being and created, met, and/or ignored challenges such as disease, water, transport, religious and class conflict, colonialism, labor, and trade. Students will read anthropology in conjunction with other disciplines (literature, urban planning, public health, architecture, and economics) to learn the ways in which ethnographies of immigration, urban poverty, class disparity, economic development and indicators, noise, and transportation substantively augment our understandings of how people live within globalization.
Terms: Win | Units: 5 | Grading: Letter (ABCD/NP)
Instructors: Jain, S. (PI)
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